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Quiz about More Cops on TV The Things They Said
Quiz about More Cops on TV The Things They Said

More Cops on TV: The Things They Said Quiz


Following on from my earlier quiz, 'Cops on TV: Let's Be Careful Out There!', here's a look at a few of the catchphrases and words of wisdom from some of my favourite TV detectives. The questions are based on both British and American television series.

A multiple-choice quiz by dsimpy. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
dsimpy
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
329,829
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
793
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 92 (9/10), Guest 216 (8/10), Guest 173 (5/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. "Fire up the Quattro!" was the catchphrase of brutal and corrupt Detective Chief Inspector Gene Hunt. Described by a police colleague as "an overweight, over-the-hill, nicotine-stained, borderline alcoholic homophobe with a superiority complex and an unhealthy obsession with male bonding," Hunt laconically replied: "You make that sound like a bad thing." Which British TV series (subsequently adapted for American television) was this? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Can you name the TV police lieutenant who opened most episodes of the Miami-based crime detection drama he/she starred in by voicing platitudes such as: "So they brought the war to us. Now we ... are going to take it to them" - while coolly putting on a trademark pair of sunglasses? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Which Scottish television series, based in the real Maryhill district of Glasgow, was well known for its detective hero's catchphrase, delivered in a rolling Glaswegian accent: "There's been a murrr-derrr!" Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Which groundbreaking American TV cop drama, which claimed "to protect the innocent", began as a radio show in 1949 and included Sergeant Joe Friday's catchphrase: "All we want are the facts, ma'am"? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Which animated cartoon TV police officer - with bumbling similarities to Inspector Clouseau and Maxwell Smart - was responsible for the catchphrase "Wowsers!"? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Oh come on, it'd be too easy to ask which lollipop-sucking TV detective's catchphrase was: "Who loves ya, baby?" So, can you tell me instead what 'Theo' is short for in the name of the character, Lieutenant Theo Kojak? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. In which 1970s series, named after the Cockney rhyming slang term for the Flying Squad of London's Metropolitan Police, was no-nonsense Detective Inspector Jack Regan's catchphrase: "Get your trousers on - you're nicked!" Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. No clues with this one. Which shabby detective's case-breaking catchphrase was: "Just one more thing ..."? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. In which cop drama series, set in the fictional English town of Denton - and which marked a departure for actor David Jason from earlier comic roles in programmes like 'Only Fools and Horses' and 'The Darling Buds of May' - was the catchphrase heard: "We've got him bang to rights"? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. In which series does a phobia-driven homicide consultant for the San Francisco police say of his own obsessiveness: "It's a gift ... and a curse", and about his own investigative genius: "Unless I'm wrong, which, you know, I'm not ..."? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. "Fire up the Quattro!" was the catchphrase of brutal and corrupt Detective Chief Inspector Gene Hunt. Described by a police colleague as "an overweight, over-the-hill, nicotine-stained, borderline alcoholic homophobe with a superiority complex and an unhealthy obsession with male bonding," Hunt laconically replied: "You make that sound like a bad thing." Which British TV series (subsequently adapted for American television) was this?

Answer: Life on Mars

Philip Glenister played the role of Gene Hunt in 'Life on Mars' (2006-07) and in the sequel series 'Ashes to Ashes' (2008-10). Riddled with countless prejudices, DCI Hunt was happy to fabricate evidence and beat up suspects in order to put the guilty behind bars, while tearing around in his squad's Audi Quattro.

Some (politer!) examples of his colourful dialogue included gems like: "He's got fingers in more pies than a leper in a cookery course", "Now is not the time to have a one-night stand with your conscience", and "Take your seat belt off! You're a police officer, not a bloody vicar!" Harvey Keitel played Gene Hunt in the American adaptation of 'Life on Mars', screened in 2008.
2. Can you name the TV police lieutenant who opened most episodes of the Miami-based crime detection drama he/she starred in by voicing platitudes such as: "So they brought the war to us. Now we ... are going to take it to them" - while coolly putting on a trademark pair of sunglasses?

Answer: Lt. Horatio Caine

David Caruso (previously on 'NYPD Blue') stars as crime lab lieutenant Horatio Caine in 'CSI: Miami', which first screened in 2002. A survey carried out on television ratings in 20 countries in 2006 called it the "World's Most Popular TV Show". Forever wearing, or putting on, his trademark sunglasses, the straight-talking Horatio Caine sets the scene for each episode with trite but emphatic and superbly delivered pronouncements like: "Drive-by ... Miami-style!" and "Frank, it turns out the wave is not the only thing to hit Miami." Truly great stuff!
3. Which Scottish television series, based in the real Maryhill district of Glasgow, was well known for its detective hero's catchphrase, delivered in a rolling Glaswegian accent: "There's been a murrr-derrr!"

Answer: Taggart

Screened since 1983, 'Taggart' became the longest running police drama series on British television when 'The Bill' came to a close in August 2010. Mark McManus played Detective Chief Inspector Jim Taggart from the start until his real (and screen) death in 1994, but the series continued without the Taggart character and without changing the programme title.

This was in contrast to the longstanding 'Inspector Morse' series (1987-2000) where the series was retitled 'Lewis', after Morse's sidekick, when actor John Thaw died.

It was Mark McManus himself, as Taggart, who was responsible for the understated and melodious Glaswegian catchphrase: "There's been a murrr-derrr!"
4. Which groundbreaking American TV cop drama, which claimed "to protect the innocent", began as a radio show in 1949 and included Sergeant Joe Friday's catchphrase: "All we want are the facts, ma'am"?

Answer: Dragnet

Jack Webb created the series, and also starred as Sergeant Joe Friday in 'Dragnet', which began as a radio programme in 1949 before beginning a parallel appearance on television from 1951 onwards. All in all, it ran over the course of fifteen TV seasons (with breaks), and 762 radio episodes, until ending in 2004.

This was of course the series that began with the iconic: "The story you are about to hear is true. Only the names have been changed to protect the innocent." On the one hand, the programme broke new ground with its gritty portrayal of the reality and routine of police work. On the other hand, the close working relationship it maintained with the Los Angeles Police Department ensured that controversial issues such as police racism were never tackled.
5. Which animated cartoon TV police officer - with bumbling similarities to Inspector Clouseau and Maxwell Smart - was responsible for the catchphrase "Wowsers!"?

Answer: Inspector Gadget

'Inspector Gadget' was an animated cartoon series, originally screened from 1983 to 1986, which pitted the incompetent but multi-gadgeted Inspector Gadget against Dr. Claw and his criminal M.A.D. gang. Based in Metro City, Inspector Gadget was usually saved from disaster by his niece Penny and her faithful dog Brain - helped of course by his battery of gadgets including springs, helicopters, and telescopic arms and legs.

The character of Inspector Gadget was voiced by Don Adams, who had earlier played the role of Maxwell Smart (Agent 86) in the 'Get Smart' series that ran from 1965-1970.
6. Oh come on, it'd be too easy to ask which lollipop-sucking TV detective's catchphrase was: "Who loves ya, baby?" So, can you tell me instead what 'Theo' is short for in the name of the character, Lieutenant Theo Kojak?

Answer: Theocrates

Kojak's other well-known catchphrase was: "Everybody should have a little Greek in them." Telly Savalas played the title role in the series on CBS between 1973 to 1978, and later in several TV movie formats. The origin of the trademark Tootsie Pop that Kojak sucked on was to replace the cigarettes and cigars he smoked during early episodes, as producers felt this was at odds with the growing reluctance to promote smoking on TV at that time. By the way, 'Telly' is short for Aristotelis!
7. In which 1970s series, named after the Cockney rhyming slang term for the Flying Squad of London's Metropolitan Police, was no-nonsense Detective Inspector Jack Regan's catchphrase: "Get your trousers on - you're nicked!"

Answer: The Sweeney

Actor John Thaw, who also starred in the 'Inspector Morse' series, was Detective Inspector Jack Regan in 'The Sweeney', which screened from 1975-78. (The programme's name is an abbreviation of Sweeney Todd - the Cockney rhyming slang for Flying Squad.) The Sweeney's role was tackling armed robberies and violent crime, and heavy-drinking hard man Jack Regan - racing around West London in his unmarked Ford Consul GT - was happy to break the law, fabricate evidence and beat up suspects, along with his sidekick, Sergeant George Carter (played by Dennis Waterman).
8. No clues with this one. Which shabby detective's case-breaking catchphrase was: "Just one more thing ..."?

Answer: Lieutenant Columbo

With his crumpled raincoat, endless cigars and battered 1959 Peugeot 403 convertible, Columbo seemingly muddled and fumbled his way through one murder investigation after another, from 1968 - when 'Columbo' first aired on TV - to the final episode in 2003.

The casual "Just one more thing ..." from Los Angeles homicide detective Columbo, played by Peter Falk, led, of course, to a deceptively shrewd question that began to unpick the perpetrator's false alibi, leading to a confession of guilt in the final scene. Watching the criminal's smug complacency disintegrate was what made this series compulsive viewing!
9. In which cop drama series, set in the fictional English town of Denton - and which marked a departure for actor David Jason from earlier comic roles in programmes like 'Only Fools and Horses' and 'The Darling Buds of May' - was the catchphrase heard: "We've got him bang to rights"?

Answer: A Touch of Frost

David Jason played grumpy, paperwork-hating Detective Inspector Jack Frost in fifteen series of 'A Touch of Frost', which ran from 1992 until Jason's decision to end the programme in 2010. Before 'A Touch of Frost', he had primarily been seen in successful comedy dramas in roles such as Del Boy in 'Only Fools and Horses' (1981-2003), Skullion in 'Porterhouse Blue' (1987), and Pop Larkin in 'The Darling Buds of May' (1991-93) alongside Catherine Zeta-Jones.
10. In which series does a phobia-driven homicide consultant for the San Francisco police say of his own obsessiveness: "It's a gift ... and a curse", and about his own investigative genius: "Unless I'm wrong, which, you know, I'm not ..."?

Answer: Monk

Actor Tony Shalhoub played the impossibly obsessive but brilliant homicide detective Adrian Monk in the series which ran from 2002 to 2009. Monk identified that he had 312 phobias, including germs, a fear of heights, blemishes, milk and harmonicas. Somehow, however, with the help of a nurse and unerring powers of observation, Monk solved the crime every time.
Source: Author dsimpy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor guitargoddess before going online.
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