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Quiz about The Right Cue Card
Quiz about The Right Cue Card

The Right Cue Card Trivia Quiz


I've gotten my cue cards mixed up. Please tell me which character or actor each card is for on these 1980s shows... and thank you ever so much in advance!

A multiple-choice quiz by bisaacs90. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
bisaacs90
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
358,754
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
650
Last 3 plays: Guest 173 (7/10), Guest 50 (9/10), Guest 24 (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. OK. You see that fellow over there, reclining in the chair on stage by the big desk? Yes, the older gentlemen in the suit, the one we heard giving the big belly laugh earlier. His name's Ed. He's waiting on a card... but which one is for him? Hurry, please, the studio audience is waiting. Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. This one looks really out of this world. He's got orange-brown fur all over him, and a snout that looks like an armadillo. And the way he was looking at the cat... horrid! They called him 'Alf', or something like that? I didn't catch it. He's chuckling about something. Now he's looking at me. Which card does he read to get everyone laughing? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. We're on a stage with lots of flashing lights and doors. All these pretty models walking around, showing off prizes, and everything has a price tag - but it's covered up. There's a fellow in the sound booth, waving impatiently at me. What card is for him? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Now we're in a cramped office, with several uniformed police officers sitting and listening to the man up front. The fellow up front, also in a police uniform, seems to be conducting a roll call. Not sure where we are - no one will tell me! Oh, looks like things are wrapping up - and the man in front is looking for a cue. Which card do I hold up? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. There's an odd-looking, prim woman (I think?) with glasses and a tight-lipped smile, sitting in a chair. She called the show "Church Chat", I think? She's interviewing a man she doesn't seem to have any respect for. Now he's said something she doesn't like, and she's rolling her eyes and looking at me for the cue - which card is hers? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Now we seem to be in a tavern. I can't make out the sign on the door, but there's an old wooden Indian by it over there. Everyone is drinking and talking. A portly fellow in a suit walks in, and says, "Afternoon, everybody." Now EVERYONE turns to me for the cue! Which card do I hold up? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This looks like a country inn. The sign outside says Stratford. A balding, serious-looking man with glasses is manning the front counter. Three people walk in, and they look like they came directly from the deep woods, with their dirty clothes and scruffy looks. One of the three looks expectantly at me for a cue. Can you give me the right card for him? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Now it seems we've wandered into a movie theater, but there is no one here but two men up front. And what an odd couple they make! One is taller, thinner and balding up top; the other is shorter and stouter with glasses on. They call each other Gene and Roger. They were bickering about something when we came in, but I didn't hear what. Then they watched a bit of a movie, and now they're both praising it. Then, unexpectedly, they both turn to me for the cue. Which card is theirs? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Now we're in Chicago. Two cousins are talking; one of them is named something like Balki? He has an accent I can't quite place. Anyway, he doesn't seem to understand much about American culture, like everything he's learned is from pop culture references. His cousin Larry has said something that he thinks is funny - so now he's looking at me for the cue. What's the card for him? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Now everything's all swoopy-looking, with blinking lights and panels, and everyone wearing red or blue or yellow jumpsuits. One monstrous-looking fellow has a sash on; another has one of those punk-looking band things over his eyes. They all seem to be doing the bidding of a bald man in a red jumpsuit sitting in the middle chair. One of them walks up to him and offers a plan to him - and now he looks sternly at me for the cue. Which is it? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jun 04 2024 : Guest 173: 7/10
Jun 01 2024 : Guest 50: 9/10
Apr 17 2024 : Guest 24: 10/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. OK. You see that fellow over there, reclining in the chair on stage by the big desk? Yes, the older gentlemen in the suit, the one we heard giving the big belly laugh earlier. His name's Ed. He's waiting on a card... but which one is for him? Hurry, please, the studio audience is waiting.

Answer: "Heeeeerrrreeeee's Johnny!"

Ed McMahon served as an announcer and Johnny Carson's sidekick on NBC's "The Tonight Show", from 1962 to 1992, when Carson retired. He would invariably introduce Carson with a distinctive "Here's Johnny", drawing out the first word. He was also a popular spokesman and emcee for a range of television shows and commercials.

His voice and laugh were familiar to millions. He passed away in 2009.
2. This one looks really out of this world. He's got orange-brown fur all over him, and a snout that looks like an armadillo. And the way he was looking at the cat... horrid! They called him 'Alf', or something like that? I didn't catch it. He's chuckling about something. Now he's looking at me. Which card does he read to get everyone laughing?

Answer: "Hah! I kill me!"

"ALF" was a comedy on NBC from 1986 to 1990. Though it only aired a few years, the character ALF - short for Alien Life Form - was very common in the 80s, existing also as a cartoon, comic book character and on a range of toys. Anytime ALF amused himself with something he said, he would use this catchphrase.
3. We're on a stage with lots of flashing lights and doors. All these pretty models walking around, showing off prizes, and everything has a price tag - but it's covered up. There's a fellow in the sound booth, waving impatiently at me. What card is for him?

Answer: "Come on down!"

"The Price is Right" is a CBS product, which began airing in 1972. Bob Barker served as host for the American version from its beginning until 2007, and Johnny Olson was the announcer until his death in 1985. The show was popular throughout the 1980s. TV Guide named it the "greatest game show of all time" in 2007, and in 2012 it celebrated its 40th season on the air.

The show picked its contestants from the audience, with Olson calling the drawn contestant's name, then asking them to "Come on down!" Olson's catchphrase was used by his successors after he passed away.
4. Now we're in a cramped office, with several uniformed police officers sitting and listening to the man up front. The fellow up front, also in a police uniform, seems to be conducting a roll call. Not sure where we are - no one will tell me! Oh, looks like things are wrapping up - and the man in front is looking for a cue. Which card do I hold up?

Answer: "Let's be careful out there."

NBC's "Hill Street Blues" was a popular police drama that aired from 1981-87. Sargeant Phil Esterhaus, played by Michael Conrad, usually opened the show with a roll call, which usually ended with the phrase for which he is remembered.
5. There's an odd-looking, prim woman (I think?) with glasses and a tight-lipped smile, sitting in a chair. She called the show "Church Chat", I think? She's interviewing a man she doesn't seem to have any respect for. Now he's said something she doesn't like, and she's rolling her eyes and looking at me for the cue - which card is hers?

Answer: "Well, isn't that special?"

Dana Carvey, a comedian and actor on NBC's "Saturday Night Live", played roles in several skits, but probably none more famous than the "Church Lady". Known for her holier-than-thou attitude, she offered commentary and interviews on her show, "Church Chat". The phrase here was one of several she used repeatedly.
6. Now we seem to be in a tavern. I can't make out the sign on the door, but there's an old wooden Indian by it over there. Everyone is drinking and talking. A portly fellow in a suit walks in, and says, "Afternoon, everybody." Now EVERYONE turns to me for the cue! Which card do I hold up?

Answer: "Norm!"

NBC's comedy "Cheers" aired from 1982 through 1993. Though it started slowly, it eventually became the most-watched comedy on the air. George Wendt played Norm Peterson, the bar's most popular customer. When he walked in the door, everyone called out his name.
7. This looks like a country inn. The sign outside says Stratford. A balding, serious-looking man with glasses is manning the front counter. Three people walk in, and they look like they came directly from the deep woods, with their dirty clothes and scruffy looks. One of the three looks expectantly at me for a cue. Can you give me the right card for him?

Answer: "Hi. I'm Larry, this is my brother Darryl, and this is my other brother Darryl."

William Sanderson played Larry, the oddball country bumpkin that frequently visited Bob Newhart in the Stratford Inn. Originally just a guest star, his character, and those of his brothers, became so popular that they became regulars on CBS's comedy "Newhart".

The show aired from 1982 to 1990. Larry's insistence on introducing himself and his brothers Darryl and Darryl was a running gag on the show. Another running gag was that neither Darryl spoke.
8. Now it seems we've wandered into a movie theater, but there is no one here but two men up front. And what an odd couple they make! One is taller, thinner and balding up top; the other is shorter and stouter with glasses on. They call each other Gene and Roger. They were bickering about something when we came in, but I didn't hear what. Then they watched a bit of a movie, and now they're both praising it. Then, unexpectedly, they both turn to me for the cue. Which card is theirs?

Answer: "Two thumbs up!"

Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert, movie reviewers for the Chicago Tribune and the Chicago Sun-Times, respectively, teamed up for a weekly television special to review and discuss upcoming movies. The two started in 1975 working for a local public station, and PBS picked it up nationally in 1977, under the name "Sneak Previews". The show became PBS's top rated show. In 1982, the two went to syndication, and were seen under various titles throughout the decade. The show's co-hosts were known for approving or disapproving of a film with a "thumbs up" or "thumbs down". Their show made both of them household names in America.

Gene Siskel left the show in 1999 after being diagnosed with a brain tumor. Roger Ebert continued with other co-hosts, notably Richard Roeper, until 2008.
9. Now we're in Chicago. Two cousins are talking; one of them is named something like Balki? He has an accent I can't quite place. Anyway, he doesn't seem to understand much about American culture, like everything he's learned is from pop culture references. His cousin Larry has said something that he thinks is funny - so now he's looking at me for the cue. What's the card for him?

Answer: "Don't be reedeekulous!"

Bronson Pinchot played Balki Bartokomous, an immigrant from the fictional Mediterranean island of Mypos. Balki was a shepherd on this rural island, but he dreamed of living life in America. He was taken in by his cousin Larry, and this was the premise for the ABC comedy "Perfect Strangers".

It aired from 1986 to 1993. Balki used this phrase when something seemed absurd to him. It could be very funny if he was the only one who thought the situation was ridiculous.
10. Now everything's all swoopy-looking, with blinking lights and panels, and everyone wearing red or blue or yellow jumpsuits. One monstrous-looking fellow has a sash on; another has one of those punk-looking band things over his eyes. They all seem to be doing the bidding of a bald man in a red jumpsuit sitting in the middle chair. One of them walks up to him and offers a plan to him - and now he looks sternly at me for the cue. Which is it?

Answer: "Make it so."

When Gene Roddenberry developed a sequel to the 1960s series "Star Trek", he reluctantly chose an unknown British actor to serve as the new captain. Patrick Stewart, Roddenberry felt, lacked a certain pizzazz to be his swashbuckling French captain, Jean-Luc Picard.

But the producers liked him, and Roddenberry gave in. Stewart grew into the role, and the role into him, and he eventually proved a hit with fans. The phrase here is one of a handful of catchphrases he developed. The syndicated "Star Trek: The Next Generation" aired from 1987 to 1994.
Source: Author bisaacs90

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