FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Guyanese Culture and Customs
Quiz about Guyanese Culture and Customs

Guyanese Culture and Customs Trivia Quiz


Although Guyana's motto is "One people, one nation, one destiny", it's actually "a nation of six peoples": Chinese, Africans, Amerindians, East Indians, Portuguese and Europeans. Each group brought its unique, colorful, cultural flair to the nation.

A multiple-choice quiz by yency. Estimated time: 5 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. World Trivia
  6. »
  7. Cultures
  8. »
  9. North and South American Cultures

Author
yency
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
351,410
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
381
Last 3 plays: Guest 204 (8/10), Guest 99 (5/10), Guest 35 (10/10).
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. Guyanese people are well noted for their hospitality. If you happen to visit the country during the Christmas holidays, you're likely to be served a brownish-black stew comprised of meats flavored with cinnamon, hot peppers and a dark sauce called cassava cassareep. What is this blackish dish called? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. When a Guyanese male demonstrates effeminate qualities, the consensus is often that such a person is NOT a man. He's what North Americans term "gay". Which of the following terms is the common Guyanese term for such a man? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Legend has it that should you stumble upon a corked green bottle while walking the streets of Guyana, you should avoid opening it at all costs. Failure to heed this advice can result in the release of an evil spirit which thrives on milk and banana. Which of these is said to be released from the bottle? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. You've heard about witches on broomsticks, vampires and of those who dance naked in circles in the moonlight. Well, in Guyana, you'll hear talks about an "ole higue". According to Guyanese folklore, what is the "ole higue" notorious for? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Traditionally, Afro-Guyanese engage in a celebration on their wedding eve night whereby the two families meet. They do a characteristic dance to folk songs, eat, drink and make merry. This prenuptial Afro-Guyanese celebration is called Queh-Queh (Kwe Kwe).
True or False?


Question 6 of 10
6. When driving in remote areas of Guyana at night one should be watchful for cows sleeping in the streets. During the daytime there're likely to be kids playing in the streets, and one must park momentarily to allow them to remove their wickets and get their act out of the path of traffic.
Which of the following sports is a favorite of Guyanese lads and entails use of a bat, ball and wicket ?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. At times there's a serious clash between cultural and medical practices in Guyana. With regards to cultural practices, which of the following maladies is predominant in kids and manifested by loss of appetite, weight loss and diarrhea? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. During a Guyana-Venezuelan border dispute, Guyanese, in their zeal to protect their territory, were seen chanting slogans like "Stop de 'eye-pass'! Not a blade of grass".
Alternately, two individuals may have an altercation and one may say "Dis eye-pass gat to done now!"
Which of the following is the nearest equivalent of the Guyanese term "eye-pass"?
Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Referred to as "Mash", which of the following Guyanese celebrations usually takes place on February 23rd? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. When someone in a Guyanese community dies, residents in the neighborhood assemble at the home of the deceased to offer support to the bereaved relatives. The sessions last throughout the night and often continue nightly until the individual is buried. By what term do Guyanese call this nightly vigil? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Apr 18 2024 : Guest 204: 8/10
Mar 21 2024 : Guest 99: 5/10
Mar 20 2024 : Guest 35: 10/10
Mar 19 2024 : Guest 209: 7/10
Mar 18 2024 : Guest 107: 9/10
Mar 14 2024 : Guest 141: 8/10
Mar 13 2024 : Guest 190: 10/10
Mar 11 2024 : Guest 142: 9/10
Mar 05 2024 : Guest 181: 9/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Guyanese people are well noted for their hospitality. If you happen to visit the country during the Christmas holidays, you're likely to be served a brownish-black stew comprised of meats flavored with cinnamon, hot peppers and a dark sauce called cassava cassareep. What is this blackish dish called?

Answer: Pepperpot

Guyanese pepperpot is an Amerindian dish. It can be made with meats of your choice, e.g., beef, pork and mutton. The characteristic color comes from the cassava cassareep. Pepperpot is a tasty dish which can be rewarmed and served for several days after it's made. It's usually served with home-made bread or cooked rice.
Guyanese curry is a green East Indian spicy dish. Apart from chicken, other meats such as fish, mutton, beef, crab and shrimp can also be curried. In fact, Guyanese can make curry with almost anything.
Methem is another Amerindian dish comprising "ground provision" (root vegetables) such as cassava, eddoes and sweet potatoes cooked in coconut milk.
Cook-up rice is comprised of rice, meats and peas or vegetables all cooked in one pot with coconut milk.
2. When a Guyanese male demonstrates effeminate qualities, the consensus is often that such a person is NOT a man. He's what North Americans term "gay". Which of the following terms is the common Guyanese term for such a man?

Answer: Anti man

A Guyanese male with dubious sexuality is called an "anti man". In the Guyanese accent, the term is pronounced "auntie man".
The "sweet man" is similar to the North American "player" or "ladies man".
East Indian men are referred to as "coolie men". A "buck" is a pejorative term which refers to Amerindians, therefore, a "buck man" is an Amerindian man.
3. Legend has it that should you stumble upon a corked green bottle while walking the streets of Guyana, you should avoid opening it at all costs. Failure to heed this advice can result in the release of an evil spirit which thrives on milk and banana. Which of these is said to be released from the bottle?

Answer: A backoo (Baku)

According to Guyanese folklore, the backoo is a short, evil spirit with long limbs without knee caps. It has very large eyes. The term "baku" means "short man" or "little brother", while "bacucu" means "banana" in certain West African languages. Like the genie, the Baku is said to grant its master's wishes...usually for wealth.

The master of a baku is usually a wealthy person. In return for these riches, the owner is expected to meet the needs of the baku, usually for milk and banana. If for some reason the master is unable to give the baku what it wants, the baku becomes his/her "worst nightmare".

The disgruntled baku pelts stones at its master's house and destroys things until its master becomes the poorest person in the "hood". The baku continues this assault until a person trained to capture it lures it back into a bottle. If you happen to see this bottle anywhere, do not open it! :)
4. You've heard about witches on broomsticks, vampires and of those who dance naked in circles in the moonlight. Well, in Guyana, you'll hear talks about an "ole higue". According to Guyanese folklore, what is the "ole higue" notorious for?

Answer: Feasting on the blood of people, particularly infants

According to folklore, the "ole higue" takes the form of an old woman during the daytime. At night, she transforms into a ball of fire and flies to the home of her predetermined victim. She lands on the rooftop and then sneaks into the home through a key hole. Once inside, she feasts on the blood of the unsuspecting victim. In the morning a blueish mark can be seen on the victim's skin as evidence.
The "ole higue" has certain weaknesses. For example, she's spellbound to count rice and if she drops a grain while counting, she has to start all over again. If daylight breaks and catches her counting, occupants of the home will descend upon her and beat her 'within an inch of her life' with a cabbage broom. The "ole higue" is also afraid of the color blue and can not tolerate the smell of asafoetida.
To deter an "ole higue", residents who believe the folklore dress their babies in blue sleeping clothes, employ liberal use of asafoetida and scatter raw rice around their infant's crib at nights. A cabbage broom is kept over the door.
If you make heavy chalk lines across the path of an old wrinkled woman and she's unable to cross the line, this is proof that she's an "ole higue".
5. Traditionally, Afro-Guyanese engage in a celebration on their wedding eve night whereby the two families meet. They do a characteristic dance to folk songs, eat, drink and make merry. This prenuptial Afro-Guyanese celebration is called Queh-Queh (Kwe Kwe). True or False?

Answer: True

The prenuptial queh queh provides an opportunity for the two families to meet and hand down instructions about life to the proposed young couple. The dancing is characteristically done on a wooden floor for the sound effect. African drums are sometimes used. Various folk songs about marriage life and other pertinent experiences are sung in a call and response fashion. People throw caution to the wind and dance without restraint, usually becoming very immodest.

A song continues until someone shouts "bato".
6. When driving in remote areas of Guyana at night one should be watchful for cows sleeping in the streets. During the daytime there're likely to be kids playing in the streets, and one must park momentarily to allow them to remove their wickets and get their act out of the path of traffic. Which of the following sports is a favorite of Guyanese lads and entails use of a bat, ball and wicket ?

Answer: Cricket

For many decades, Guyana has produced and continues to produce cricketers of great renown. Some of these cricketers include Rohan Kanhai, Clive Lloyd, Roy Fredericks, Alvin Kallicharan, Carl Hooper and Shivnarine Chanderpaul.
7. At times there's a serious clash between cultural and medical practices in Guyana. With regards to cultural practices, which of the following maladies is predominant in kids and manifested by loss of appetite, weight loss and diarrhea?

Answer: "Bad eye" or "evil eye"

The onset of symptoms is usually acute and begins after someone visits your home or pays a compliment to you about your baby. It's believed to be some sort of evil associated with envious feelings towards the infant.
To safeguard infants from bad eye, those who believe in its existence place a black dot on the center of the baby's forehead or use a red ribbon bow when styling the girl's hair. The child is taken to a pandit or other person experienced in handling such matters for treatment.
From a medical perspective, these infants are found to be suffering from a form of malnutrition called marasmus or from gastroenteritis. The belief in "bad eye" often delays treatment as the child is taken to the hospital as a last resort - which may be too late.
Nara is a condition associated with abdominal pain. The abdomen is 'cupped' and anointed by a person skilled in these matters - every neighborhood has such a person. For those who have been in fact suffering from a case of appendicitis, this cupping and anointing can lead to rupture of the inflamed appendix and a surgical emergency develops. Malaria and Filariasis are diseases transmitted by mosquitoes and more common in adults.
8. During a Guyana-Venezuelan border dispute, Guyanese, in their zeal to protect their territory, were seen chanting slogans like "Stop de 'eye-pass'! Not a blade of grass". Alternately, two individuals may have an altercation and one may say "Dis eye-pass gat to done now!" Which of the following is the nearest equivalent of the Guyanese term "eye-pass"?

Answer: Disrespect

"Eye-pass" in Guyanese terms means disrespect. Check out the following examples:
1. "Look lil bai, nah tek yuh eyes pass meh!" In English, this is interpreted as "Look little boy, stop being disrespectful."
2. "Dis eye-pass gat to done now!" means "I'm putting an end to this disrespect at once."
When a Guyanese says the latter, one should take cover. Something drastic or even dangerous is about to happen.

"Not a blade of grass" is a song by Dave Martins and the Tradewinds which reflect Guyanese position on the border issue.

Here's the first stanza and chorus:

"We are a peaceful people, strugglin' we struggle
And we don't look for trouble, just ask around.
But when outside faces, from foreign places talk about taking over
We ent backin' down.

We ent givin' up no mountain
We ent givin' up no tree
We ent givin' up no river
That belong to we.
Nat one blue sackie
Nat one rice grain
Nat one curass
Nat a blade of grass."
9. Referred to as "Mash", which of the following Guyanese celebrations usually takes place on February 23rd?

Answer: Mashramani

Many nations have some sort of celebration that's done in honor of their national life. Guyanese are no different. Guyana became a republic on February 23rd 1970 and ever since, its anniversary is celebrated yearly in the month of February. This celebration is called Mashramani, which is an Amerindian word meaning "celebration after work" or "celebration of a job well done." The celebration entails a series of events which culminate on February 23rd with parades, street dancing, Calypso finals, fashion shows and many other activities.
Ed-Ul-Adha is a Muslim holy day during which they celebrate the willingness of the prophet Abraham to sacrifice his son.
Phagwah is celebrated in March. It's a Hindu religious holiday enjoyed by many Guyanese. People dress in white and drench each other with a red colored liquid called abeer. Powder or water is sometimes used as a substitute for abeer.
Diwali is a beautiful Indian festival of lights.
10. When someone in a Guyanese community dies, residents in the neighborhood assemble at the home of the deceased to offer support to the bereaved relatives. The sessions last throughout the night and often continue nightly until the individual is buried. By what term do Guyanese call this nightly vigil?

Answer: Wake

The wake or vigil provides support for the bereaved who in turn provide food and drinks. Members of the community sometimes volunteer in sponsoring this feast. People play cards, drink alcohol, sing and talk about life. They use the time also to reflect upon the life of the deceased.
Source: Author yency

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor stedman before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Related Quizzes
1. The Persistent Puebloans Easier
2. The Steadfast Seminole! Average
3. The Empire of the Sun Average
4. The Tenebrous Teotihuacan! Average
5. A Cajun Quiz Average
6. The Mayan Ball Game Average
7. Mayans in the Yucatan Average
8. Newfoundland Language and Culture Average
9. O'odham Culture Average
10. Double-Leg Takedown Average
11. The Mayan World Very Difficult
12. The Tohono O'odham Tough

4/21/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us