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Quiz about Leeds Yorkshires Finest
Quiz about Leeds Yorkshires Finest

Leeds: Yorkshire's Finest! Trivia Quiz


Ah, Leeds. Home of the illustrious Leeds Rhinos, the successful Bramley Tigers, and the frankly appalling Leeds United football club. A behemoth of a city in one of the country's most rural areas, Leeds will always be my home. Until I move to Hull.

A multiple-choice quiz by Flynn_17. Estimated time: 7 mins.
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Author
Flynn_17
Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
263,643
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
843
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
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Question 1 of 10
1. Ah, Leeds. Home to around 700,000 residents, who are known locally as Leodensians. Now, this term may not be as widely known to the rest of the country as terms such as Mancunian or Liverpudlian, but there's a perfectly rational explanation for this bizarre moniker - which is? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Every area of Leeds has that little thing that makes it special. Some suburbs of Leeds have more of interest than others, however. Armley just happens to be one of these. Which of the following famous Leeds landmarks is not to be found in Armley? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. The Light is one of Leeds' most recent additions to the gamut of shopping centres. Not only does it have a multi-screen cinema, but it also has an office block! This building, however, has an interesting misnomer - but what is the name, and why is it so incorrect? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Leeds cathedral is hardly impressive, being a relatively small church of little architectural interest. What does make Leeds cathedral quite special, however, is the bells. I've selected three facts about the bells here, and brazenly created a fourth. Please identify the false statement about said bells? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Most people in Leeds are rather au-fait with Dortmund Square, a famous landmark of Leeds is one of the few that has not been changed in recent years. There is, however, an extremely pertinent reason behind the naming of Dortmund square. What is it? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. The popularity of "Bo Selecta" means most people would be able to pick out Leigh Francis from a line-up. One character from his show is especially memorable, however, and that's the stalking super-fan Avid.

Here's the crux of the question - after which Leeds shopping centre is this famous character named after?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Leeds isn't known for its tumultuous musical talent. Then in the early 2000s, Leeds' trickle of talent became a full on flood of harmonies recorded on little plastic discs. Today, there are two artists who consistently top the charts - but which of these chart-topping artists is from Leeds? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. One of the most famous landmarks in Leeds has to be the Corn Exchange. Now, I realise that a lot of cities have a Corn Exchange, but it's the architecture of the Leeds building that makes it so special. Which of the following facts is true about this majestic structure, located in the city centre? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Harewood House is a Yorkshire mainstay. Located in the Harewood, this stately home has many interesting features. One thing Harewood house has is something of a "flighty" affair. In fact, it could almost be called a living natural history museum. Oh, what am I talking about? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. All said, the crime rate in Leeds (coupled with irresponsible drivers, damaged pavements, and haphazard pedestrian crossings) means you may need a hospital at some point during a stay here. The most famous hospital in Leeds, though, is probably Jimmy's (Saint James'). Today Jimmy's is most famous for having...? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Ah, Leeds. Home to around 700,000 residents, who are known locally as Leodensians. Now, this term may not be as widely known to the rest of the country as terms such as Mancunian or Liverpudlian, but there's a perfectly rational explanation for this bizarre moniker - which is?

Answer: The Roman name for the settlement was Loidis (Leodis), ergo the residents are Leodensian.

Leeds has been known by many names throughout its long and fruitful history. The name Loidis (Leodis) was a name used by both the invading Romans, and the small Celtic community who inhabited the area that is now Elmet. This community lasted up until the invasion and subsequent settlement of the Anglo-Saxons.

Leeds has been officially recognised since its mention in the Domesday Book, in which time it was known as Ledes, and further renaming occurred throughout the centuries as the city became known as Leedes and finally Leeds. Not too bad for a small independent Celtic settlement that was invaded by Northumberland and faded into obscurity in 616!

And just for another little bit of trivia, the people of Leeds are also known as Loiners. This also comes from the original name of the city, Loidis. Most of the inhabitants of Leeds are also happy to be known as Tykes, even though Tyke really refers to people from Barnsley.
2. Every area of Leeds has that little thing that makes it special. Some suburbs of Leeds have more of interest than others, however. Armley just happens to be one of these. Which of the following famous Leeds landmarks is not to be found in Armley?

Answer: The Royal Armories - a large museum containing regal artifacts and medieval wares such as swords.

Armley, a suburb of Leeds that almost carried the economy of Leeds due to its milling industry, is an area of museums and giant woollen mills. The mill in Armley, which is now Armley Mills Industrial Museum, was the largest of its kind in the world when it was built in the last 18th century, and was the centre of the textile industry in Leeds up until the late 1800's. Because of this thriving industrial background, there were many Victorian homes, churches, and schools constructed in Armley, most of which are still standing. From 1872 until 1956, Armley was also home to the infamous J W Roberts asbestos handling corporation. Because of the heavy use of asbestos in the area, Armley became a hot spot for mesothelioma, an asbestos related lung cancer, and these mesothelioma clusters persist to this very day. One famous sufferer of the disease, June Hancock, brought a case forward against J W Roberts in 1993, and although Mrs Hancock won the case, the corporate restructuring of J W Roberts meant that the case could not be settled...


A few famous facts about Armley, now. The author Barbara Taylor Bradford was born and raised in this suburb of Leeds, and the memorable "tank scene" in the 1963 film "Billy Liar" was filmed in Wellington Road. Even the playwright Alan Bennett was born here!
3. The Light is one of Leeds' most recent additions to the gamut of shopping centres. Not only does it have a multi-screen cinema, but it also has an office block! This building, however, has an interesting misnomer - but what is the name, and why is it so incorrect?

Answer: The Cube - it's not cubic. It's a large cuboid with a point on top.

The Light, the major shopping centre that the Cube is attached to, was once the headquarters of the Leeds Permanent Building Society. When the headquarters were moved to Lovell Park in the early 1990's, the building became temporary offices for Leeds City Council until their renovation and re-opening in 2001, as the Light. Now onto the more interesting facts!

The Light contains the only multiplex cinema in Leeds, with 13 screens for the more discerning moviegoer. Although there was at one point several cinemas in the town centre, such as the Odeon on the Headrow, by 2003, the Light offered the only cinema left in the city centre. The Cube, which was also opened in 2001, contains both residential and commercial units, and currently houses 1,500 staff from the call centre firm Ventura.
4. Leeds cathedral is hardly impressive, being a relatively small church of little architectural interest. What does make Leeds cathedral quite special, however, is the bells. I've selected three facts about the bells here, and brazenly created a fourth. Please identify the false statement about said bells?

Answer: Leeds Cathedral has one singular bell, but it is badly cracked, and therefore of no interest to campanologists.

Leeds Cathedral, for a start off, is unusually small. Not only is this compared to other churches in the city, but also to cathedrals in the neighbouring towns and cities. If you like more architecturally interesting or Gothic churches, visit Chapel Allerton, although many have been converted in Ramgarhia Board properties. Worryingly, Leeds cathedral is tiny compared to the one in Ripon (which is a settlement that can only be described as a small town that just happens to have a cathedral.)

Back to the bells, however. Each of the bells in the Leeds cathedral weighs only 9cwt, as I mentioned. This is unusual, as when most bells are collected in eights, each bell weighs 15cwt, to make a total weight of 120cwt. The Leeds Parish church also has a bell, but this is hung singularly and weights 40cwt. Wasn't that not-particularly-interesting?
5. Most people in Leeds are rather au-fait with Dortmund Square, a famous landmark of Leeds is one of the few that has not been changed in recent years. There is, however, an extremely pertinent reason behind the naming of Dortmund square. What is it?

Answer: Leeds is twinned with Dortmund, in Germany.

Most of the landmarks in the city have had their names changed many times - an example of this kind of change can be seen in Millennium Square (which was once named Mandela Gardens.) It is, therefore, unusual that Dortmund Square is still known as such.

Dortmund Square, which can be found just outside of the St John's Centre, was constructed and opened in 1980 in memoriam of the tenth anniversary of the twinning of the two cities. Although this is a small area, it serves as a busy walkway for shoppers and the workers of the city. From 1980 until 2007, a statue known as the "Dortmund Drayman" stood in the middle of the square. It was presented to the city by the people of Dortmund and sculpted by Dortmund resident Arthur Schulze-Engels. Sadly, this large bronze statue of a stout fellow carrying a barrel was cordoned off and subsequently removed.

With regards to the comment about Leeds pilots heavily bombing the city during the Second World War, this may be true, but is not in any way relevant to the question. It was the city of Dresden in Germany where the majority of the bombs fell.
6. The popularity of "Bo Selecta" means most people would be able to pick out Leigh Francis from a line-up. One character from his show is especially memorable, however, and that's the stalking super-fan Avid. Here's the crux of the question - after which Leeds shopping centre is this famous character named after?

Answer: The Merrion Centre

The Merrion Centre is a small shopping centre on the northern border of Leeds City Centre. The Centre itself is close to the Leeds suburb of Little London, an area so named as in the 1960's, many Londoners inhabited the area. Today, however, Little London is one of the most run-down and dangerous of the Leeds council estates. I wouldn't recommend it to any visitors.

Irish FunTrivia players may also realise that there is a Merrion Centre in Dublin, which is also the home to the Japanese Embassy to Dublin. The Leeds centre contains no such important international organisations, but is the home of the second largest static market-place outside of the Leeds Markets building.

Now back to Leigh Francis. Born in Old Farnley, a small suburb in the southern end of the city, he was "discovered" by the British television presenter Davina McCall. In subsequent television series such as "Bo! In The USA", Leigh Francis' character, along with his fictional wife Sacha, own a hotel named "The Merrion Hotel" - this, too, is a real place. The Merrion Hotel is a reasonably priced hotel attached to the Leeds Merrion Centre.
7. Leeds isn't known for its tumultuous musical talent. Then in the early 2000s, Leeds' trickle of talent became a full on flood of harmonies recorded on little plastic discs. Today, there are two artists who consistently top the charts - but which of these chart-topping artists is from Leeds?

Answer: Corinne Bailey-Rae, with her eponymously titled debut.

Although Leodensian acts have been trickling onto the music scene since the early 1980's, many Leeds acts have fallen by the wayside while bands from the nearby cities of Sheffield and Manchester have revelled in the BritPop and BritRock scenes.

The other major talent of Leeds, of course, is the Kaiser Chiefs, who since the release of their debut album "Employment", have gone from strength to strength. By playing many festivals and frequently breaking the top ten with songs like "Ruby" (which got to number one in mid-2007) and "Oh My God" (a number six hit in 2006), the Kaisers have become international starts. So much so, in fact, that their second album, "Yours Truly, Angry Mob", hit the top spot in the UK, Greece, and the Netherlands.

Corinne Bailey-Rae, the main focus of this question, has achieved similar success to the Kaiser Chiefs. With her second release, "Put Your Records On" getting to number two in the British chart (and number six in the New Zealand chart), as well as hitting to top spot on the British Airplay, Download, and R&B Singles chart, this home-grown songstress has had the best possible start.

Corinne was born in Leeds, West Yorkshire, to an English mother and a Kittitian father (that is to say, he was from the Caribbean island of St. Kitts and Nevis. Attending Allerton High School (the school I attended, incidentally), Corinne became head-girl in 1996, and also formed an all-girl Indie band named "Helen" while she was a student. Recently, Corinne has become something of a local hero, with her image plastered on local newspapers and many reviews conducted by the Yorkshire Evening Post and the Metro (a free newspaper available on buses.)
8. One of the most famous landmarks in Leeds has to be the Corn Exchange. Now, I realise that a lot of cities have a Corn Exchange, but it's the architecture of the Leeds building that makes it so special. Which of the following facts is true about this majestic structure, located in the city centre?

Answer: All of these, and more! It is also a meeting point for members of the Gothic subculture!

This circular Victorian building, as the name suggests, was used as a Corn Exchange, but that is possibly the least interesting thing about this Grade One listed building and Leeds heritage site!

Although Cuthbert Brodrick's most famous building project was Leeds Town Hall (which he won 200 for designing), the Corn Exchange still stands as one of his most memorable pieces of architecture in Yorkshire. Brodrick also designed the Grand Theatre, which in 2007 was closed to be converted into The City Museum, and the infamous Grand Hotel in Scarborough. Brodrick sadly died a recluse at the ripe old age of 84 on the island of Jersey, in the Channel Islands, but his design of the three aforementioned buildings in Leeds has permanently shaped the look of Leeds.

The renovation of the Corn Exchange, which began in 1985 and was completed in 1990, saw the decidedly Victorian area of Leeds surrounding the Exchange open to renovation. As developers bought into the area and filled the 19th century buildings with high-class bars and boutiques, this became (and remains) one of the most fashionable areas of the city.
9. Harewood House is a Yorkshire mainstay. Located in the Harewood, this stately home has many interesting features. One thing Harewood house has is something of a "flighty" affair. In fact, it could almost be called a living natural history museum. Oh, what am I talking about?

Answer: And educational bird garden, or aviary, featuring many rare species such as the Hornbill and Kiwi.

The Himalayan garden complete with its own Buddhist stupa, a massive adventure playground (where I used to pass the hours), good food, and even a tour around the house itself await those brave enough to drive half an hour out of the town centre.

The massive bird garden at Harewood House is the most extensive public aviaries in Yorkshire. In fact, so popular is Harewood House, that it won the "Large Visitor Attraction of the Year" award in 2003! Built in the 18th century for the Lascelles family, the house is now owned by George Lascelles, also known as Lord Harewood. His mother, in fact, was Mary, the daughter of George V and Queen Mary.

Now, an interesting little side argument comes with this tourist attraction. The vast majority of people in the United Kingdom are compelled to pronounce Harewood as "Harwood" - the customary pronunciation and spelling back in the 18th century. Today, however, the people of Leeds always pronounce the -e in there. To me, it will always be "Hare-wood" House.
10. All said, the crime rate in Leeds (coupled with irresponsible drivers, damaged pavements, and haphazard pedestrian crossings) means you may need a hospital at some point during a stay here. The most famous hospital in Leeds, though, is probably Jimmy's (Saint James'). Today Jimmy's is most famous for having...?

Answer: The largest Oncology unit in Europe.

For such a metropolis, Leeds is hardly inundated with hospitals, but this is probably one of the best to visit if you don't mind sitting in A&E for five hours...

Completed in 2007, the massive Oncology unit (which was built on the former car park of this inner-city hospital) is the largest hospital department in Europe dedicated purely to the treatment of cancer.

Today, Jimmy's seems to have lost the stigma it received during the last century for its terrible ratings. In the '90s, in fact, Jimmy's was best known for its poor performance in government inspections. The loss of this stigma could be due, in part, to the production of a television series in the late 1980's and early 1990's, which showed the reality of the hospital. "Jimmy's", as the series was called, ran for seven years on Yorkshire Television and gave Saint James's something more to be famous for!

So, that was Leeds. It's not exactly the most glamorous city in the United Kingdom, but it is easily one of the largest and more metropolitan areas around. From the town centre to the tourist attractions on the outskirts, the hospitals to the shopping centres, Leeds is a place that I'll miss when I leave.

But then, I'll have Hull to explore.

Oh, good.

Flynn out.
Source: Author Flynn_17

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor minch before going online.
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