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Quiz about Name That Rodent
Quiz about Name That Rodent

Name That Rodent! Trivia Quiz


Can you tell a mouse from a rat? A mole from a vole? Test your knowledge of order Rodentia with this challenging photo quiz! Each animal will only be a correct answer once. North American common names apply unless otherwise noted.

A photo quiz by gracious1. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
gracious1
Time
4 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
371,583
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
876
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 96 (8/10), Guest 167 (8/10), Guest 82 (5/10).
photo quiz
1. Eek! What is this creature, Mus musculus, that scurries with its large ears and little hairless tail and is a pest when wild (but a nice pet when domesticated)? Hint

Cavy
Field mouse
House mouse
Rat

2. Oh, this animal is a blight in urban areas in Europe and North America and was believed by the English in the 18th century to have arrived from Norway, although more likely it came from Asia. What is its scientific name? Hint

Sigmodon arizonae
Rattus rattus
Rattus norvegicus
Neotoma cinerea

photo quiz
photo quiz
3. Sometimes called a whistle-pig or a mouse-bear, this particular ground squirrel (Marmota monax) is widespread throughout North America, even up to Alaska. Hint

Chipmunk
Groundhog
Prairie dog
Pika

4. This largest rodent in the world has a barrel-shaped body, webbed feet, and not much of a tail. What on earth is its name? Hint

Agouti
Capybara
Laotian giant flying squirrel
Swedish Viking rat

photo quiz
photo quiz
5. This small, burrowing member of the subfamily Arvicolinae is usually mistaken for anything other than what it is! Will you be fooled? Hint

Mouse
Gopher
Vole
Mole

6. These rodents are fairly large and are often used for medical experiments. Found in the wild in South America but domesticated world over, what is one of their common names, especially in North America? Hint

Guinea pig
Beaver
Fitchew
Coatimundi

photo quiz
photo quiz
7. The Captain and Tenille sang a song about the mating habits of this critter, but I wouldn't use it to pass your biology exams. What is this smelly, semi-aquatic rodent? Hint

Beaver
Ground squirrel
Muskrat
Polecat

8. Some people have trouble telling a gerbil from a hamster. Which one is this little fellow, with his tail and his longer snout?

Answer: (One Word -- gerbil or hamster)
photo quiz
photo quiz
9. This Arctic dweller does not hibernate in the winter but instead burrows under the snow to eat the grass-clippings it has stored for the season. What is it? Hint

Groundhog
Pika
Lemming
Chipmunk

10. Here is an herbivorous, semi-aquatic rodent native to South America but now found all over the world (mostly as a pest). What on earth is it? Hint

An otter
A polecat
A mink
A nutria (coypu)

photo quiz

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Most Recent Scores
Sep 25 2023 : Guest 96: 8/10
Sep 23 2023 : Guest 167: 8/10
Sep 23 2023 : Guest 82: 5/10
Sep 14 2023 : Guest 162: 9/10
Sep 12 2023 : Guest 202: 8/10
Aug 13 2023 : Guest 94: 9/10
Aug 12 2023 : Guest 67: 7/10
Aug 10 2023 : cos61mh: 7/10
Aug 07 2023 : Guest 204: 7/10

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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Eek! What is this creature, Mus musculus, that scurries with its large ears and little hairless tail and is a pest when wild (but a nice pet when domesticated)?

Answer: House mouse

Mus musculus is the house mouse, the fancy mouse (when domesticated as a pet), or the laboratory mouse. This crepuscular creature eschews bright light, but it doesn't see much better in the dark than a human being, and they cannot discern as many colors. Omnivorous, house mice love fruits and grains but will even eat their own feces. When house mice live indoors and water is plentiful, there is very little female-female aggression, but if they live outdoors, female-female aggression is much higher (but then so is male-male aggression, too.)

In North America the field mouse is usually in fact the meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus), while Old World field mice are true mice but in a completely different genus, Apodemus.
2. Oh, this animal is a blight in urban areas in Europe and North America and was believed by the English in the 18th century to have arrived from Norway, although more likely it came from Asia. What is its scientific name?

Answer: Rattus norvegicus

Pictured is the common brown rat, also called the Norway rat (hence 'norvegicus') and the unflattering sewer rat. 'Rat' and 'mouse' are not scientific terms, but generally rats are bigger than mice, and both are muroids (members of superfamily Muroidea). In the middle ages, Rattus norvegicus in cooler areas displaced its black cousin, Rattus rattus, which had invaded cities in Europe eons earlier, in the 1st century A.D. The black rather the brown rat spread the Black Death, however.

Neotoma cinerea is the pack rat, and Sigmodon arizonae is the Arizona cotton rat.
3. Sometimes called a whistle-pig or a mouse-bear, this particular ground squirrel (Marmota monax) is widespread throughout North America, even up to Alaska.

Answer: Groundhog

Groundhogs, also known as woodchucks, are true hibernators. They can go 150 days without eating, yet lose no more than a quarter of their bodyweight because of their lowered metabolism. During their winters' sleep, their body temperature drops from 99F (37C) to 37F (2.8C); their heart rate slows from 80 beats per minute to a mere two! The myth of groundhogs as weather prognosticators probably came from the habit of males to wake early from hibernation to look for burrows of females.
4. This largest rodent in the world has a barrel-shaped body, webbed feet, and not much of a tail. What on earth is its name?

Answer: Capybara

Capybaras graze like cattle on grass, up to 8 pounds (4 kg) daily, and they also eat fruits and tree bark. Capybaras are not endangered, and until 1969 it was legal in Brazil to hunt capybaras for their skin, which was to make anything from wallets to shoes. It is still legal but regulated in Venezuela. They have been kept as pets and used as service animals for the blind.
5. This small, burrowing member of the subfamily Arvicolinae is usually mistaken for anything other than what it is! Will you be fooled?

Answer: Vole

Generally speaking voles are stouter than mice, and their tails are shorter, their heads rounder, and their ears and eyes smaller. The various species are mistaken for shrews, gophers, moles, and many other rodents and insectivores. The woodland vole (Microtus pinetorum) (pictured on the front page of this quiz) is quite monogamous, whereas its cousin the meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus), also known as the field mouse, is quite promiscuous, especially the male. Vole teeth have been used to date archaeological sites, in a method known as the Vole Clock, based on the evolution of the species.

Other members of subfamily Arvicolinae include lemmings and muskrats.
6. These rodents are fairly large and are often used for medical experiments. Found in the wild in South America but domesticated world over, what is one of their common names, especially in North America?

Answer: Guinea pig

Guinea pigs, a/k/a cavies, live to 3-4 years in the wild, and up to seven in captivity. The species of guinea pig kept as a pet descends from, but is distinct from, the wild species that roams the mountains and grasslands of Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, and Peru. Wild guinea pigs live in burrows or rock crevices with in family groups of 5-10 members and come up in the daytime to graze on leaves, grass, and flowers.

The more submissive cavies bow their heads and make low rumbling noises at dominant cavies.
7. The Captain and Tenille sang a song about the mating habits of this critter, but I wouldn't use it to pass your biology exams. What is this smelly, semi-aquatic rodent?

Answer: Muskrat

Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) live in monogamous pairs with their young. Native to North America, muskrats have been introduced to the wetlands of South America and Eurasia, including Russia. In Native American mythology, when other animals failed, the muskrat brought up the mud from the bottom of the primordial sea used to create the world. Muskrats build nests called push-ups in marshes, which sometimes have to be rebuilt each year when they are swept away in spring rains.

Whereas a beaver's tail is flat horizontally, a muskrat's tail is flat vertically, which means it can use its tail as a rudder.

A polecat is indeed pungent but it is a weasel, not a rodent.
8. Some people have trouble telling a gerbil from a hamster. Which one is this little fellow, with his tail and his longer snout?

Answer: gerbil

Gerbils have tails, whereas hamsters do not. The gerbil also has a longer snout and leaner face than the hamster, and is a little more active, and will jump. Gerbils are diurnal, whereas hamsters are nocturnal and will keep their owners up at night by running in their little hamster wheel.

Gerbils, a/k/a desert rats, live in groups in the wild, whereas hamsters are solitary. Wild gerbils live in extensive burrows in the deserts of Africa and Asia, and surface only to find food and water. Wild hamsters most likely originated from desert regions of Asia, but now inhabit semi-desert regions of every continent except Antarctica.
9. This Arctic dweller does not hibernate in the winter but instead burrows under the snow to eat the grass-clippings it has stored for the season. What is it?

Answer: Lemming

Whether the brown lemming or the Norway lemming, these herbivores do not commit mass suicide despite the legend, although occasional mass migration when population rates explode can sometimes lead to death by drowning. Generally, however, they lead solitary lives in the tundra.
10. Here is an herbivorous, semi-aquatic rodent native to South America but now found all over the world (mostly as a pest). What on earth is it?

Answer: A nutria (coypu)

Actually, it's a coypu, from the Mapuche language of Chile and Argentina. The Myocastor coypus is also known in North America as a river rat or a nutria (although that last name is somewhat confusing, because in Spanish-speaking countries 'la nutria' is "the otter", so in Latin America they use the Mapuche name.) Italians call it 'il castorino' ("the little beaver"). Although introduced to Eurasia and Africa as fur-bearing animal, it has basically become an invasive species that does serious environmental damage. Interestingly the female coypu has nipples very high on her flanks so that her babies can feed while she is in the water.

Otters and minks, while also semi-aquatic, are not rodents but mustelids, members of the weasel family.
Source: Author gracious1

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