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Quiz about Tour of England LZ
Quiz about Tour of England LZ

Tour of England L-Z Trivia Quiz


Having failed to get up the hill on my last bike ride round England, it's time to try again. I've been watching lots of fitness programmes on TV so I'm hopeful.

A multiple-choice quiz by Spontini. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
Spontini
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
375,599
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
9 / 10
Plays
868
Last 3 plays: Guest 31 (9/10), CardoQ (10/10), Guest 94 (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. This large Merseyside city was one end of the world's first steam-only railway in 1830. It was created to carry raw materials and finished goods between this port and the mills of Manchester. Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. The boom in textile manufacturing and the building of canals to transport coal and goods in the early 19th century led to this city becoming the world's first 'industrial' city. Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. This city, or town as it was then, in the centre of England, was captured by Vikings in 867 AD and in the 11th century, a castle was built there by the River Leen. Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. This city, found at the junction of the Rivers Thames and Cherwell, is famous for its 'dreaming spires' and its university. Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. This important naval city, situated on the south coast of England, is where you will find the world's oldest dry dock, Nelson's flagship HMS Victory, and the Tudor warship Mary Rose. Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. This midland town on the river Avon has given its name to a sport which has spread across the world. Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This Warwickshire town attracts almost five million visitors a year which is rather a lot for a town with a population of around 25,000 in 2007. Of course, it is the birthplace of a famous Elizabethan author. Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. The site of the world's first bridge made of iron in Ironbridge, Shropshire, on the banks of the river Severn, now lies within the boundaries of this new town. Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. This city, not far from the birthplace of William Shakespeare, has a very large castle which was established in 1068 following the Norman Conquest.

Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. On the river Ouse, this walled city gives its name to the area it can be found in. An important city in the Christian religion of the UK, it is home to the National Railway Museum. Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Mar 01 2024 : Guest 31: 9/10
Feb 28 2024 : CardoQ: 10/10
Feb 27 2024 : Guest 94: 10/10
Feb 26 2024 : Mike2055: 9/10
Feb 16 2024 : chianti59: 10/10
Feb 12 2024 : Guest 35: 9/10
Feb 12 2024 : Guest 35: 10/10
Feb 10 2024 : Guest 51: 10/10
Feb 08 2024 : NETTLES1960: 8/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This large Merseyside city was one end of the world's first steam-only railway in 1830. It was created to carry raw materials and finished goods between this port and the mills of Manchester.

Answer: Liverpool

The railway ran from Liverpool to Manchester. It influenced other railways throughout the world, with its signalling system being used throughout Britain and the United States. It also set the gauge of the track (4 ft 8 inches) as the normal standard.
2. The boom in textile manufacturing and the building of canals to transport coal and goods in the early 19th century led to this city becoming the world's first 'industrial' city.

Answer: Manchester

In the early days of railways, Manchester was also one end of the world's first passenger carrying intercity line between it and Liverpool. Its population expanded at a terrific rate because of the jobs available in local factories. As Manchester became an economic powerhouse, the increase in population led to it being granted city status in 1853, the first new city in Britain for over 300 years.
3. This city, or town as it was then, in the centre of England, was captured by Vikings in 867 AD and in the 11th century, a castle was built there by the River Leen.

Answer: Nottingham

Nottingham is famous as a centre of the lace-making industry and for the stories of Robin Hood and the Sheriff of Nottingham. A further claim to fame are three very old public houses. "Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem" claims to have been established in 1189, making it England's oldest public house, but there is unfortunately no documentary evidence. "Ye Olde Salutation Inn" dates from around 1240 and "The Bell Inn" from around 1437.

It's probably safe to say no other UK city can boast three drinking establishments of such age.
4. This city, found at the junction of the Rivers Thames and Cherwell, is famous for its 'dreaming spires' and its university.

Answer: Oxford

Oxford University is the oldest university in the English speaking world. The actual date founded is not known for sure but there is evidence of teaching taking place there before 1096 AD. Only Bologna University in Italy, founded in 1088, can go further back in Europe.
5. This important naval city, situated on the south coast of England, is where you will find the world's oldest dry dock, Nelson's flagship HMS Victory, and the Tudor warship Mary Rose.

Answer: Portsmouth

The wreck of the Mary Rose which sank in 1545 was discovered in 1971 and was raised in 1982. Brought back into a purpose built building in Portsmouth, the process of drying it started in 2013. The intervening 31 years were taken up with spraying the wood with chemicals to stop it deteriorating in air after over 400 years in water. All sorts of preservation techniques have been used, including introducing pond snails to it so that they would graze on the fungi and microbes that would otherwise degrade the wood.
6. This midland town on the river Avon has given its name to a sport which has spread across the world.

Answer: Rugby

It is said that while playing a game of football (soccer) at Rugby School in 1823, William Webb Ellis broke the rules of the game and picked up the ball and ran with it. The rest is history. The game actually goes back further than that. Rugby is also the place where Frank Whittle built the prototype jet engine in 1937.
7. This Warwickshire town attracts almost five million visitors a year which is rather a lot for a town with a population of around 25,000 in 2007. Of course, it is the birthplace of a famous Elizabethan author.

Answer: Stratford-upon-Avon

William Shakespeare was born there in 1564 and died there in 1616. The town charter was granted in 1196. Stratford comes from old English words meaning 'Street' and 'ford', being a place where a road crosses a river.
8. The site of the world's first bridge made of iron in Ironbridge, Shropshire, on the banks of the river Severn, now lies within the boundaries of this new town.

Answer: Telford

The iron bridge was constructed in 1779 by Abraham Darby III. The town of Telford, named after the famous English civil engineer Thomas Telford, was created in the 1960s-1970s by building a new town to incorporate five small towns all within a few miles of each other. Ironbridge was one of those towns. Telford has grown rapidly and had a population of around 200,000 in 2010.
9. This city, not far from the birthplace of William Shakespeare, has a very large castle which was established in 1068 following the Norman Conquest.

Answer: Warwick

Warwick can trace its history back to an early settlement in the 6th century. The castle was initiated by William the Conqueror and over the centuries, has remained one of the grandest and largest castles in the country. It was sold to the Tussauds Group (of waxwork fame) in 1978 and is now used as a tourist attraction where you can see displays of medieval armour, archery, jousting, castle dungeons, hawking and other medieval entertainments.
10. On the river Ouse, this walled city gives its name to the area it can be found in. An important city in the Christian religion of the UK, it is home to the National Railway Museum.

Answer: York

York is of course, the main city of Yorkshire. The Archbishop of York is second only to the Archbishop of Canterbury in the Church of England. The medieval history of the city is still evident in some areas where the streets are very narrow with overhanging timbered buildings. Vikings often invaded the area around York and there is a wonderful museum there (the Jorvik Viking Centre) where you will be transported back to 975 AD and experience life in those times.
Source: Author Spontini

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Tizzabelle before going online.
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