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Quiz about Dr Quackerys Medicine Shop
Quiz about Dr Quackerys Medicine Shop

Dr. Quackery's Medicine Shop Trivia Quiz


Medical quackery is the sale of fraudulent and/or unproven medical practices. This centuries long practice has a long and colorful history. Some instances of quackery were harmless, while others had devastating results.

A multiple-choice quiz by dcpddc478. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
dcpddc478
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
352,250
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
1645
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 174 (4/10), Guest 173 (8/10), irishchic5 (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Clark Stanley called himself the "Rattlesnake King" and became rich and famous by selling which product that he claimed would cure just about anything? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. In the 19th century, 'Kopp's Baby Friend' was just one of the many baby medications that contained alcohol and which substance to help calm your sick baby? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. The 'Magnetone' and the 'Theronoid', both guaranteed to cure a huge variety of ailments, were examples of what type of medical quackery? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. At the beginning of the 20th century, bathing in which of the following substances was touted to cure everything from cancer to baldness? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. 'Hall's Vegetable Sicilian Hair Renewer' was one of the many baldness cures that was sold in the 18th century that contained which of the following poisons? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Dr. Franz Anton Mesmer was an influential 18th century German physician who claimed he could cure a multitude of problems through the manipulation of which of the following terms? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Which of the following things was a real piece of medical quackery? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Considered a cure for a variety of disorders, which of the following procedures was performed on thousands of people in the mid-20th century, with a huge variety of results? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Quack potions, elixirs, and pills are a thing of the past.


Question 10 of 10
10. During the early part of the 20th century Dr. John R. Brinkley transplanted the testicles of a goat into over 10,000 men as a cure for impotence.



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Clark Stanley called himself the "Rattlesnake King" and became rich and famous by selling which product that he claimed would cure just about anything?

Answer: Snake oil

In 1879, ex-cowboy Clark Stanley began performing in front of large crowds by killing rattlesnakes in what he claimed was the first step in the process of making his mysterious cure-all 'snake-oil'. For 50 cents a bottle, quite a sum in those days, he claimed his patent medicine could cure migraines, toothaches, sprains, as well as a huge variety of other ailments.

He made a small fortune selling his concoction. This was an example of the 'placebo effect'. About one third of those who bought his 'medicine' would experience some relief, simply because they expected to.

In 1917, the Federal government seized a shipment of his snake oil and had it tested. It was found to contain 99% mineral oil with traces of red pepper, beef fat and turpentine thrown in to add color, flavor, and a medicinal smell.

His factory was promptly shut down, but the term 'snake oil' survives.
2. In the 19th century, 'Kopp's Baby Friend' was just one of the many baby medications that contained alcohol and which substance to help calm your sick baby?

Answer: Opium

During the 19th century there were no laws and standards controlling the sales of patent medications. Some medications that were sold were simply harmless scams, but others were very dangerous. 'Kopp's Baby Friend', 'Dr. Fahrney's Teething Syrup' and 'Hooper's Anodyne' were just a few of the medications sold to tired parents who were eager for a full night's sleep.

They contained alcohol and opium and were pretty much guaranteed to put the baby to sleep. The labels advised increasing doses as the child grew (and developed a tolerance to the medication). Thousands of babies were turned into helpless opium addicts, and many died from overdoses of the medication.

It was not until the American Medical Association publicized the dangers of these medications at the turn of the century that their popularity began to wane.
3. The 'Magnetone' and the 'Theronoid', both guaranteed to cure a huge variety of ailments, were examples of what type of medical quackery?

Answer: Electromagnetic coil

Very popular from 1860-1940, the electromagnetic coil was touted to cure everything from cancer to the common cold. It was also said make you feel and look younger. These harmless devices claimed that an electromagnetic coil supercharged the iron in your body, assisting with the transference of oxygen between cells.

They were usually sold in the form of a belt that contained a large coil of insulated wires. The buyer, in the privacy of their own home, would strap on the belt, plug it in, and receive the cure.

It was painless, harmless, and depended completely on the 'placebo effect'.
4. At the beginning of the 20th century, bathing in which of the following substances was touted to cure everything from cancer to baldness?

Answer: Radioactive water

At the beginning of the 20th century it was found that many of the naturally occurring mineral springs had small amounts of radioactive water. This discovery resulted in many people reaching the incorrect conclusion that bathing in radioactive water was good for you.

Many of these spas, which had been used for centuries, started calling themselves 'radium spas'. Medical journals of the time, claimed that radium slowed aging and helped to cure insanity. Companies sold radioactive water claiming that drinking this liquid increased the bodies energy, charged the cells and helped the body to get rid of waste products. Machines like the 'Revigator' and the 'Radium Emanator' were sold for home use. By using these machines you could radiate your own water for drinking and bathing. Radioactive beauty cream, toothpaste and ear plugs were also sold at this time.

These industries failed completely once the true effects of radiation were ascertained, but this was only after millions of dollars were made off of the naive public. How many people were harmed after engaging in these practices is not known.
5. 'Hall's Vegetable Sicilian Hair Renewer' was one of the many baldness cures that was sold in the 18th century that contained which of the following poisons?

Answer: Lead

Cures for baldness have been sought for centuries. 'Hall's Vegetable Sicilian Hair Renewer' was just one of the many quack cures sold on the open market. This popular tonic promised to destroy the bacteria feeding on the scalp of bald men while providing nutrition for their starving hair roots.

It made use of lead, which colored the hair darker, often fooling the user into thinking that more hair was growing. Many desperate users of this product fell ill with lead poison which led to health issues that took their minds off of their hair loss.
6. Dr. Franz Anton Mesmer was an influential 18th century German physician who claimed he could cure a multitude of problems through the manipulation of which of the following terms?

Answer: Magnetisme animal

According to Mesmer, 'Magnetisme animal' which translates to 'animal magnetism', was the natural ability of some human beings to help cure illness in others. Those who had this attribute, namely himself, could correct imbalances in the 'universal fluid' which flows through all living things. Through the use of magnets, Mesmer claimed that he could clear the blockages found in other humans that were making them ill.

He claimed, and many believed, that magnets could redirect the flow of body fluids resulting in a cure for almost every known disease and disorder. Using music, special lighting, chanting and some stagecraft he bilked thousands of Europeans with his magnetic treatments. Magnets are still advertised today, with varying claims of curative properties. Mesmer's productions were so elaborate and intoxicating that this effect now carries his name: mesmerizing.
7. Which of the following things was a real piece of medical quackery?

Answer: Dr. Scott's Electric Hair Brush

Around 1880 Dr. George A. Scott starting selling his electric hair brush. It was, in fact, a regular hair brush that had been slightly magnetized. He also sold electric hair curlers and electric flesh brushes. None were electrical, but the name was enough to entrance a populace that was enthralled with the new power of electricity that was being used in a variety of ways.

This savvy businessman was smart enough to tell buyers that you could not share your brush or its powers would be greatly diminished.

In this way, he made sure that everyone bought their own personal device. He claimed the use of his products could cure blood poisoning, malaise, impotence, and neurological disorders. He made millions of dollars with this scheme.
8. Considered a cure for a variety of disorders, which of the following procedures was performed on thousands of people in the mid-20th century, with a huge variety of results?

Answer: Lobotomy

Dr. Walter Freeman was a prominent neurologist and psychiatrist who popularized the horrible brain surgery that is known as a lobotomy. He originally performed his surgery by using an icepick, inserting it into the corner of the eye of the unfortunate patient.

After breaking through the skull bone he would wiggle the icepick around to cut neural connections. This procedure was often done without anesthetic and the patient was subjected to electroshock therapy when it was over. While he refined his techniques over time, and many other doctors performed the surgery, the results were always unknown and many patients were left in semi-vegetative states, or with severe mental deficiencies.

The 1975 movie "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" attempted to portray one of the many possible after-effects of such surgery.

This questionable surgery was performed by unethical doctors long after the lack of positive outcomes had been ascertained.
9. Quack potions, elixirs, and pills are a thing of the past.

Answer: False

This is completely false. Unproven treatments are advertised on the Internet everyday, usually by spamming. Those who are desperate for a cheaper treatment, an alternative treatment, or are simply curious often fall for these offers. Some examples of modern quackery include psychic surgery, magnetic treatments, and some herbal or alternative remedies.

Modern laws have helped stem practitioners of deliberate medical fraud, but as the old saying goes: "There's a sucker born every minute".
10. During the early part of the 20th century Dr. John R. Brinkley transplanted the testicles of a goat into over 10,000 men as a cure for impotence.

Answer: True

As shocking as this might sound, it is true. American Dr. John R. Brinkley made millions of dollars transplanting the testicles of goats into the scrotum of males who were suffering from 'sexual weakness', now known as impotence. While the 'placebo effect' did occur, and many men believed that they had been cured, there were many other unfortunate patients who died from infection.

He also claimed the implantation of goat testicles could cure dementia, cancer and emphysema. Brinkley was responsible for grafting the testicles of a goat into at least 16,000 men. Once it was discovered that many patients died, that he had not gone to medical school, and performed surgery while intoxicated, his popularity declined.

He was sued many times, which destroyed his reputation, and he died penniless.
Source: Author dcpddc478

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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