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Quiz about Japanese American Internment
Quiz about Japanese American Internment

Japanese American Internment Trivia Quiz


How much do you know about the internment of the Japanese Americans?

A multiple-choice quiz by Christa_Smith. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
277,087
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
1553
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
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Question 1 of 10
1. What was the name given to the first generation Japanese in the USA prior to World War II? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Long before the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans were the object of racism. Which of these demands of the Oriental Exclusion League were passed into law? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. How many Japanese Americans were convicted of espionage in the USA in World War II? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. What was the main reason the Japanese Americans were interned? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. At least two-thirds of those sent to internment camps were American citizens.


Question 6 of 10
6. By what name did the American government wish to call the internment camps? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Even though Pearl Harbor is in Hawaii, only a small fraction of the Japanese Americans in Hawaii were interned.


Question 8 of 10
8. Which camp was most comparable to a Nazi concentration camp? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. On what date did the final internment camp close? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. What year did the Japanese Americans receive an apology for their unnecessary internment? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. What was the name given to the first generation Japanese in the USA prior to World War II?

Answer: Issei

The Issei were not American Citizens. They settled mainly in Califorinia and were particularly successful in farming. They often cultivated marginal land and grew rice and various kinds of fruit. The next generations were called Nisei, Sansei and Yonsei respectively.

According to Wikipedia, 'Kibei ... (literally "go home to America") was a term often used in the 1940s to describe Japanese Americans born in the United States who returned to America after receiving their education in Japan'.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kibei
2. Long before the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans were the object of racism. Which of these demands of the Oriental Exclusion League were passed into law?

Answer: All of these

The ban on land ownership applied in California from 1913. It was not a Federal law.

In 1924 Congress virtually banned all further migration to the U.S. As a token gesture a very small number of Japanese were allowed in.

In the 1930s the invasion of Manchuria and later of the rest of China by Imperial Japan also played a part in making the Japanese Americans unpopular in the U.S.
3. How many Japanese Americans were convicted of espionage in the USA in World War II?

Answer: 0

The Japanese Americans were loyal to the USA. In a letter to President Roosevelt, the Japanese American Citizens' League proclaimed, "On behalf of our fifteen thousand members, we unreservendly volunteer the facilities of our office to the defense of our land against attack. In this solemn hour, we pledge our fullest cooperation to you, Mr. President, and to our country."
4. What was the main reason the Japanese Americans were interned?

Answer: the United States felt they were spies for Japan, and thus a danger to the country's well being

Attorney General Earl Warren also claimed that the Japanese Americans were deliberatly located in strategic areas to carry out acts of sabatoge. Warren felt that they were going to 'use their tractors to tear up country roads.' There was no evidence to support such claims and Warren had failed to admitt that the Japanese Americans living arrangements were decided for them due to restrictions that had been placed on them years before Pearl Harbor.

After the Japanese Americans were released, it was discovered that the only people found guilty of being spies for Japan, were some white Americans.
5. At least two-thirds of those sent to internment camps were American citizens.

Answer: true

Of the 110,000 sent to the camps, two-thirds were Americans citizens, and over half were children and infants. Along with the Japanese Americans, German and Italian Americans who were deemed a threat were also interned.
6. By what name did the American government wish to call the internment camps?

Answer: relocation centers

The American government called them relocation centers so that they would not be compared to the concentration camps in Europe. Once at these centers each internee was given a letter and every family a number. This became their identification until they left the camp.
7. Even though Pearl Harbor is in Hawaii, only a small fraction of the Japanese Americans in Hawaii were interned.

Answer: True

There were approximately 150,000 people of Japanese descent living in Hawaii at the time of the bombing. Only about 2,500 of those were interned. This was mainly due to the fact that the Japanese contributed heavily to the economy of the Hawaiian territory.
8. Which camp was most comparable to a Nazi concentration camp?

Answer: Tule Lake

The Tule Lake camp included tanks patrolling the grounds and 'trouble makers' being forced to renounce their US citizenship at gun point. Anyone who answered no to the Loyalty Question, which asked all Japanese Americans if they would renounce Japan and declare allegiance to the United States, was sent to this camp.
9. On what date did the final internment camp close?

Answer: March 20, 1946

Tule Lake was the last camp to close. The internees who renounced their citizenship at Tule Lake were deported to Japan, while some others left on their own accord. Despite the fact that the goverment later admitted that the Japanese Americans were not a threat to national safety, they continued to be harrassed for many years after their release.
10. What year did the Japanese Americans receive an apology for their unnecessary internment?

Answer: 1992

In 1992, forty-six years after the final camp closed, President George Bush formally apologized for the internment. In 1948 the American Japanese Claims Act was passed. It stated that all claims for war losses not reported within 18 months would be 'forever barred.' In 1976 President Gerald Ford rescinded the Executive Order from 1942 establishing the camps.

In 1988 Ronald Reagan signed the Civil Liberties Act which provided $20,000 civil redress for all survivors of the camps.
Source: Author Christa_Smith

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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