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Quiz about A Grain of Truth
Quiz about A Grain of Truth

A Grain of Truth Trivia Quiz


...but it's the whole grain of truth! My mate Kev the Chef is an expert in grains and has been invited to teach the apprentice chefs about whole grains and their place on the modern menu. We'll just slide into a back seat in the classroom...

A multiple-choice quiz by VegemiteKid. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
VegemiteKid
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
367,442
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
754
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 170 (7/10), DeepHistory (3/10), Guest 172 (4/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Kev the Chef, just a little nervous addressing a class of apprentices, adjusts his white apron. "Use your noodles, class. What sort of whole grain, often used in pancakes, would generally be used to make Japanese soba noodles?" Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Kev the Chef places a bowl of coarse grain on the table. "This is bulgar wheat, which can be used as a tasty whole-grain substitute for rice in a dish such as pilaf," he states. "Does anyone have a ghost of an idea of what traditional Middle Eastern dish is usually made using bulgar?" Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Kev the Chef's voice takes on a reminiscent tone as he talks about the next whole grain. "My dear old Mum used to make the best veggie soup and included this grain for both texture and nutrition. It lowers cholesterol too! But I bet you've had this grain more often in a schooner of beer! True or false, class? Is this grain barley?


Question 4 of 10
4. "I've eaten rolled oats made into creamy porridge every morning for the last fifteen years!" boasts Kev the Chef. "It's a tradition at my place to put milk and brown sugar on it, but the doc tells me that's not such a great idea. One little known fact about oats, though - can you lads and lassies tell me in which country universities used to grant students a day off study to go home to their farms and help gather more oats for food?" Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Kev the Chef shows the class a wonderful-looking salad. "This is quinoa, the whole grain superfood of which I'm sure most of you have heard - you may even have eaten it. Though it's not a true cereal, as it's not a grass, it does contain extremely high levels of protein, with 18 grams per cup of cooked grain. Its botanical name is Chenopodium, but can any of you birdbrains tell me its common name?" Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. "Time to wet your whistles, class," says Kev the Chef. "Are you able to tell me what toasted whole grain is combined with green tea leaves to make the Japanese drink, genmaicha?" Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Kev the Chef displays a soft, pliable flatbread to the class of apprentices. "This is injera, and it's made from a whole grain called teff. It's served under a traditional dish, tsebhi, a kind of curry made from lamb or chicken which you may also have heard called 'wat'." Kev chuckles; I know a pun is coming. "In WAT African country are these traditional foods?" Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. "Who'd like to take a guess about this next whole grain, which is called freekeh?" asks Kev the Chef. "You probably already know, being studious apprentices, that it's an ancient grain traditionally cooked with spices such as coriander and cinnamon, and served with cooked lamb. But can you tell me what's different about freekeh when compared with ordinary wheat?" Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Kev the Chef chuckles to himself as he introduces the next whole grain to the class. "Now, I know you've all eaten this little gem," he says. "There's dozens of ways to eat it, and it's been used for thousands of years in cooking across the world, and for feeding to animals, as well. My favourite way to eat it is out of a box or bag at the movies. Okay, I admit to adding a little butter to it," says Kev, patting his tummy. "Which of you clever-looking apprentices is bursting to tell me what this grain is?" Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. "Now look at this little beauty," says Kev the Chef, running a small yellowy grain through his fingers. "You've all heard of millet before, I'm sure and this variety, pearl millet, is great for making creamy porridge to which you can add fruit or nuts, and it's great to add a handful to the batter when you're making muffins or pancakes. Sadly, millet is more often seen as a food for what creature, rather than as food for people?" Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jul 13 2024 : Guest 170: 7/10
Jul 11 2024 : DeepHistory: 3/10
Jul 07 2024 : Guest 172: 4/10
Jul 03 2024 : amarie94903: 10/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Kev the Chef, just a little nervous addressing a class of apprentices, adjusts his white apron. "Use your noodles, class. What sort of whole grain, often used in pancakes, would generally be used to make Japanese soba noodles?"

Answer: Buckwheat

Kev tells the class that buckwheat is worth including in the diet for a number of reasons. From strengthening the walls of the capillary vessels, it has also been shown to relieve some symptoms of Type 2 diabetes. For people who are allergic to wheat or gluten it makes a good wheat substitute, because it's actually related to rhubarb and sorrel and therefore a fruit seed.
2. Kev the Chef places a bowl of coarse grain on the table. "This is bulgar wheat, which can be used as a tasty whole-grain substitute for rice in a dish such as pilaf," he states. "Does anyone have a ghost of an idea of what traditional Middle Eastern dish is usually made using bulgar?"

Answer: Tabouli

Kev is full of dad jokes, and he loves taBOOli. He hands out a recipe for Mediterranean tabouli salad which he tells us is extremely high in Vitamins K and C and, of course, in fibre. It also provides significant quantities of iron, partly because of the inclusion of parsley in the recipe.
3. Kev the Chef's voice takes on a reminiscent tone as he talks about the next whole grain. "My dear old Mum used to make the best veggie soup and included this grain for both texture and nutrition. It lowers cholesterol too! But I bet you've had this grain more often in a schooner of beer! True or false, class? Is this grain barley?

Answer: True

Kev says he'd be surprised if barley in beer lowers cholesterol the way is does when it's used as a whole grain, and recommends that the class not count on beer as a dietary aid. According the %DV scale (percentage of Daily Value) where more than 15% is considered good, barley has a fibre measure of 42%. It's also high in trace elements.

He hands out the recipe for his mum's vegetable soup, which I can hardly wait to try!
4. "I've eaten rolled oats made into creamy porridge every morning for the last fifteen years!" boasts Kev the Chef. "It's a tradition at my place to put milk and brown sugar on it, but the doc tells me that's not such a great idea. One little known fact about oats, though - can you lads and lassies tell me in which country universities used to grant students a day off study to go home to their farms and help gather more oats for food?"

Answer: Scotland

Kev the Chef tells us that Meal (or Oatmeal Monday) was observed on the second Monday of February by most Scottish universities. In older times it was held more often, as much as monthly, as students had to travel long distances to get home from the university cities. Because of the short growing season of oats, coupled with its tolerance of rain and lower summer heat requirement, it was ideally suited to the climate of Scotland, but had to be gathered when it was ready for harvest.
5. Kev the Chef shows the class a wonderful-looking salad. "This is quinoa, the whole grain superfood of which I'm sure most of you have heard - you may even have eaten it. Though it's not a true cereal, as it's not a grass, it does contain extremely high levels of protein, with 18 grams per cup of cooked grain. Its botanical name is Chenopodium, but can any of you birdbrains tell me its common name?"

Answer: Goosefoot

"2013 was recognised as 'The International Year of the Quinoa'" says Kev. "It contains certain antioxidant phytonutrients and has anti-inflammatory properties". He goes on to tell us it's also a source of heart-healthy fats. Due to its vigorous nature and abundance of nutrients, it is hoped that quinoa will become a significant means of securing worldwide food stockpiles.
6. "Time to wet your whistles, class," says Kev the Chef. "Are you able to tell me what toasted whole grain is combined with green tea leaves to make the Japanese drink, genmaicha?"

Answer: Brown rice

Only the outermost layer, the hull, of the rice kernel is removed in producing brown rice. "When polishing rice to produce white rice, it has been ascertained that nearly 70% of the vitamin B3, more that 80% of the vitamin B1 and vitamin B6, much of the trace elements, most of the iron, and all of the dietary fibre and essential fatty acids are removed," says Kev. "While it's chewier and the taste is slightly different, I encourage you to include whole grain brown rice in your diet!"
7. Kev the Chef displays a soft, pliable flatbread to the class of apprentices. "This is injera, and it's made from a whole grain called teff. It's served under a traditional dish, tsebhi, a kind of curry made from lamb or chicken which you may also have heard called 'wat'." Kev chuckles; I know a pun is coming. "In WAT African country are these traditional foods?"

Answer: Ethiopia

Kev the Chef tells us that tsebhi is also endemic to Eritrea. Teff, the grain used to make the injera served with tsebhi, is also called Williams lovegrass or annual bunch grass. The size of its grain is tiny. It provides protein and calcium and is high in dietary fibre and iron. Because it cooks quickly, it was attractive to ancient cultures as it consumed less in valuable wood or other sources of fuel (like dried animal dung).
8. "Who'd like to take a guess about this next whole grain, which is called freekeh?" asks Kev the Chef. "You probably already know, being studious apprentices, that it's an ancient grain traditionally cooked with spices such as coriander and cinnamon, and served with cooked lamb. But can you tell me what's different about freekeh when compared with ordinary wheat?"

Answer: It is harvested while still unripe

Kev tells us that after frekek, or frikeh, is harvested and the chaff removed, it's roasted and threshed, after which it is cracked. At this point it's ready to use and is similar in nature and appearance to green bulgar.

One ancient recipe, found in a 13th century Mesopotamian cook book, indicates meat is sautéed then braised with water, salt, and cinnamon bark. Ground coriander and frekah are added, then the whole is cooked, with the final addition of cumin, cinnamon, and fresh animal fat, usually lamb.
9. Kev the Chef chuckles to himself as he introduces the next whole grain to the class. "Now, I know you've all eaten this little gem," he says. "There's dozens of ways to eat it, and it's been used for thousands of years in cooking across the world, and for feeding to animals, as well. My favourite way to eat it is out of a box or bag at the movies. Okay, I admit to adding a little butter to it," says Kev, patting his tummy. "Which of you clever-looking apprentices is bursting to tell me what this grain is?"

Answer: Corn

"Corn is a great whole grain," says Kev. "It can be ground to make polenta, traditional to cultures such as Italian and Greek, and is used to make a nutritional breakfast porridge in the Southern United States and elsewhere. Of course, nothing beats fresh corn-on-the-cob cooked with a dob of butter in a bit of foil and thrown into the coals of a campfire for 10 or so minutes. Now I'm hungry!"
10. "Now look at this little beauty," says Kev the Chef, running a small yellowy grain through his fingers. "You've all heard of millet before, I'm sure and this variety, pearl millet, is great for making creamy porridge to which you can add fruit or nuts, and it's great to add a handful to the batter when you're making muffins or pancakes. Sadly, millet is more often seen as a food for what creature, rather than as food for people?"

Answer: Birds

"It's a pity millet is not included more in everyday diets," Kev tells us. "It has significant quantities of trace elements such as copper, phosphorus, manganese, and magnesium. It has been shown that magnesium helps reduce the severity of asthma attacks and the frequency of migraines. Hydrated magnesium sulfate, (MgSO4·7 H2O) is better known as Epsom salts.

"Also," he goes on, "Millet, being a whole grain, and other foods low in saturated fats and cholesterol and that contain at least 51% whole grains can claim to lower the risk of heart disease and certain cancers."
Source: Author VegemiteKid

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
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