FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Gardeners Challenge
Quiz about Gardeners Challenge

Gardener's Challenge Trivia Quiz


This quiz should prove an interesting challenge to the serious gardener in the United States, and may prove to be interesting to others as well. Have fun!

A multiple-choice quiz by egstrasser. Estimated time: 5 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Hobbies Trivia
  6. »
  7. Homes & Gardens
  8. »
  9. Plants & Gardens Flowers

Author
egstrasser
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
187,191
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
10 / 15
Plays
4784
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 15
1. John Chapman collected the pits from many cider mills. He took these seeds and planted them throughout the Midwest, United States. He tended these apple nurseries and offered the small plants to the settlers as they moved west. He did this so that pioneers making their way west would have fresh fruit to eat. This man was known as: Hint


Question 2 of 15
2. An American gardener interested in xeriscape would surely garden in which of the following states? Hint


Question 3 of 15
3. A gardener decides to place a bird feeder in the garden to feed finches. The feeder selected is a thistle feeder. The gardener hesitates to use this feeder, fearing that thistles will invade the garden. Why is this not a real threat? Hint


Question 4 of 15
4. A gardener notices that there is a weed in the garden that looks like yellow and red threads with no leaves. It appears to attach itself to the desired plants and these host plants are rapidly declining. This weed is: Hint


Question 5 of 15
5. Chipmunks and squirrels have been eating many of the gardener's spring bulbs. Which one of the following bulbs would be least likely to be eaten? Hint


Question 6 of 15
6. The tomato plants started on the windowsill become very "leggy" before they can be placed out in the garden. What is the term for this condition? Hint


Question 7 of 15
7. If a seed has a tough seed coat, it may take a long time for the seed to germinate. You can hasten the procedure by nicking the seed or treating with acid to break the seed coat. What is this procedure called? Hint


Question 8 of 15
8. A gardener buys a blue hydrangea, and two years later he notices it turned pink. Why did this happen? Hint


Question 9 of 15
9. If an ornamental pear tree (such as a Bradford variety) is grafted with a scion from a fruiting variety (for example a Bosc variety) is it possible to get a full sized pear fruit?


Question 10 of 15
10. A gardener is contemplating buying some fruit trees. He is looking at the varieties: Winesap, Delicious, and Baldwin. What kind of orchard is he planning? Hint


Question 11 of 15
11. A frost is expected tonight and the orchard is in full bloom. The gardener expects to turn on overhead sprinklers when the temperature reaches 33 degrees Fahrenheit. Will this save the crop?


Question 12 of 15
12. A gardener decides to plant a Redhaven peach pit. Will this definitely grow into another Redhaven peach tree?


Question 13 of 15
13. Bees and hummingbirds are known to be important pollinators. Are there any nonhuman mammals which are also pollinators?


Question 14 of 15
14. The horticulturist Luther Burbank was responsible for many new plants including the Shasta daisy, and the Santa Rosa plum.


Question 15 of 15
15. The most important reason for trying to keep exotic new pests from entering another country is that there may not be any natural predators to keep the pest in check.



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Jun 16 2024 : Guest 71: 12/15
Jun 07 2024 : Guest 189: 12/15

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. John Chapman collected the pits from many cider mills. He took these seeds and planted them throughout the Midwest, United States. He tended these apple nurseries and offered the small plants to the settlers as they moved west. He did this so that pioneers making their way west would have fresh fruit to eat. This man was known as:

Answer: Johnny Appleseed

Some of these orchards still exist today, and some of the remaining trees may even bear fruit.
2. An American gardener interested in xeriscape would surely garden in which of the following states?

Answer: Arizona

Xeriscape is the method of gardening which tries to use as the least amount of water as possible. The use of drought resistant native plants is stressed. This type of gardening is most useful in arid areas such as the western United States. It may be used in other areas but, states with low average rainfall are prime candidates.
3. A gardener decides to place a bird feeder in the garden to feed finches. The feeder selected is a thistle feeder. The gardener hesitates to use this feeder, fearing that thistles will invade the garden. Why is this not a real threat?

Answer: Thistle seed is not used in these feeders

The seed is not a thistle seed, it is Guizotia abyssinica commonly known as niger or nyjer seed. It closely resembles a sunflower.
4. A gardener notices that there is a weed in the garden that looks like yellow and red threads with no leaves. It appears to attach itself to the desired plants and these host plants are rapidly declining. This weed is:

Answer: dodder

In December of 1982, large shipments of niger seed were detained at U.S. ports of arrival because they were contaminated with dodder seed (Cuscuta sp.). A scientist with the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture)was given the task of finding a treatment before any of these shipments could be released.

The treatment was found within a few weeks, and this treatment is now mandatory for all niger/nyjer shipments entering the United States. The seeds are heat treated which kills the dodder seed (because it is mostly water).

The niger/nyjer is usually not harmed because of its high oil content.
5. Chipmunks and squirrels have been eating many of the gardener's spring bulbs. Which one of the following bulbs would be least likely to be eaten?

Answer: daffodils

Daffodil/narcissus have a mild toxin which rodents dislike. They will, however even eat daffodils if nothing else can be found.
6. The tomato plants started on the windowsill become very "leggy" before they can be placed out in the garden. What is the term for this condition?

Answer: etiolated

When plants receive too little light, they tend to become etiolated. Lack of light, elongates plants while sunlight does not stimulate and trigger new growth. You may have noticed a plant seems to grow at night. Vines particularly are good to show off this phenomenon.
7. If a seed has a tough seed coat, it may take a long time for the seed to germinate. You can hasten the procedure by nicking the seed or treating with acid to break the seed coat. What is this procedure called?

Answer: scarifying

Many seed coats, especially those of tree seeds, are very hard to penetrate with moisture. Dipping the seed in acid or nicking the seed with a file or other instrument will facilitate the initiation of germination. This process is called scarification.
8. A gardener buys a blue hydrangea, and two years later he notices it turned pink. Why did this happen?

Answer: The soil pH became higher

To maintain a hydrangea's blue color, the soil must be maintained in an acid state. If lime is added to the soil it becomes less acidic, and the flowers will be pink.
9. If an ornamental pear tree (such as a Bradford variety) is grafted with a scion from a fruiting variety (for example a Bosc variety) is it possible to get a full sized pear fruit?

Answer: Yes

Both the ornamental pear and the fruiting pear are compatible (same genera) and the graft (if done properly) will take. The result should be a full size Bosc pear forming on the ornamental Bradford pear tree.
10. A gardener is contemplating buying some fruit trees. He is looking at the varieties: Winesap, Delicious, and Baldwin. What kind of orchard is he planning?

Answer: apple

He is looking to start an apple orchard and he needs several varieties to insure proper pollination.
11. A frost is expected tonight and the orchard is in full bloom. The gardener expects to turn on overhead sprinklers when the temperature reaches 33 degrees Fahrenheit. Will this save the crop?

Answer: Yes

Still water will freeze at 32 degrees Fahrenheit. If running water is constantly applied to the flowering trees, the surface temperature should remain at 33 degrees. This will protect the developing fruit from being killed by frost, but may not help with a "hard freeze".
12. A gardener decides to plant a Redhaven peach pit. Will this definitely grow into another Redhaven peach tree?

Answer: no

Most fruit trees are grafted using scions from known varieties. The chance of a pit becoming exactly like the parent tree is very slim. It is possible it could grow into a tree that has few values. It could even grow to be a nectarine. With a pit, you never know what the plant will be. It could even revert back to an undesirable wild peach.
13. Bees and hummingbirds are known to be important pollinators. Are there any nonhuman mammals which are also pollinators?

Answer: Yes

Bats are mammals and do pollination of many of the night blooming plants
14. The horticulturist Luther Burbank was responsible for many new plants including the Shasta daisy, and the Santa Rosa plum.

Answer: True

Luther Burbank, Henry Ford and Thomas A. Edison were friends and would often be seen together.
15. The most important reason for trying to keep exotic new pests from entering another country is that there may not be any natural predators to keep the pest in check.

Answer: True

When an exotic pest enters another country, it lacks the predators who control it in its native land. This explains why the introduced pest usually has a population explosion.
Source: Author egstrasser

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Bruyere before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
6/23/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us