Quiz about Ten Architectural Niches Around the World
Quiz about Ten Architectural Niches Around the World

Ten Architectural Niches Around the World Quiz


Architecture has changed drastically over the centuries. Take this quiz and visit ten different schools of architecture, exploring general aesthetics and the like. Good luck!

A photo quiz by kyleisalive. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
kyleisalive
Time
4 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
363,282
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
2323
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: agentofchaos (10/10), Guest 217 (9/10), Guest 31 (6/10).
1. What subclass of medieval Romanesque architecture built as far back as the early eleventh century is mainly found in England (in structures like Winchester Cathedral and Colchester Castle) and features large, rounded arches? Hint

Norman
Ottoman
Lombard
Anglo-Saxon

photo quiz
2. In which city would you be most likely to find Gothic architecture, characterised by pointed arches, usually on religious structures? Hint

Stockholm, Sweden
Cairo, Egypt
Cappadocia, Turkey
Paris, France

photo quiz
3. Baroque emerged after Renaissance Architecture's reign in Europe. Why would you be likely to see Baroque not only in Italy, where it was first created, but also in India and Peru? Hint

Due to rapid colonization and religious spread
It was done as a tit-for-tat response; Europe used Indian and Peruvian influences, so the favour was returned
Because the Pope of the Catholic Church decreed it the standard
The style was disseminated by Marco Polo as he sailed around the globe

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4. Expressionist architecture, which started at the beginning of the twentieth century, was considered a stylistic response created as a result of which major event? Hint

The advent of motion pictures
World War I
The 1900 World's Fair in Paris
The colonization of Australia

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5. Constructivist architecture, preserving the general aesthetics of Communism, can primarily be found in what country? Hint

Germany
China
Cuba
Russia

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6. Part of the Modernist school of art, what form of architecture, originally from Germany, did away with adornment to provide basic structures dedicated to functionality? Hint

Bauhaus
Art Nouveau
De Stijl
Googie

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7. Balance and volume were the main focus of International Style, the influence of which spanned several decades in the mid-twentieth century. Which of these buildings was not part of this movement? Hint

Lovell House, Los Angeles
Place de Ville, Ottawa
Petronas Towers, Kuala Lumpur
Toronto-Dominion Centre, Toronto

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8. Which of these inspirations is frequently seen in structures built in Art Deco style? Hint

Death
Environmentalism
Christianity
Technology

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9. Deconstructivism, a tributary of Postmodern architecture, is known for its box-shaped buildings and uniformity.

True
False

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10. Which of these features would typically be seen on a building made with Sustainable Architecture in mind? Hint

Underground parking
Solar panels
Paper walls
Astro-turf

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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. What subclass of medieval Romanesque architecture built as far back as the early eleventh century is mainly found in England (in structures like Winchester Cathedral and Colchester Castle) and features large, rounded arches?

Answer: Norman

While large, rounded arches are only one part of this architectural wave which commenced nearly a millennium ago, Norman stylings cropped up mainly in what is now the United Kingdom. Found in larger structures like castles, churches, and cathedrals, particularly the great abbeys of Britain, Norman architects valued vast, open space and based their works on that being done by the French on the channel coast. All of this was just a reflection of a larger movement occurring at the time, the Romanesque, which spanned Europe and influenced buildings from Poland to Spain to Croatia and everywhere in between, making it the widest-scale architectural period in Europe since Ancient Roman times. Buildings of this style use rounded, semicircular arches, large, Corinthian-inspired pillars, and expensive stone vaulted ceilings.
2. In which city would you be most likely to find Gothic architecture, characterised by pointed arches, usually on religious structures?

Answer: Paris, France

Gothic architecture was a major wave in Europe following the Romanesque Period and to this day it's a major sight to be seen when visiting European churches, particularly those in Germany, France, and the UK. Like Romanesque architecture before it, Gothic was characterized by large, open spaces, usually upward to majestic vaulted ceilings. Where rounded arches predominated the Romanesque, Gothic turned to the pointed arch. Famous Gothic buildings include Notre-Dame Cathedral, Amiens Cathedral, and Lyon Cathedral-- all in France. Most are notably tall. Due to a revived interest in Gothic architecture in later centuries, Gothic structures can also be found in the Americas from the parliament buildings in Ottawa, Canada to cathedrals in Brazil.
3. Baroque emerged after Renaissance Architecture's reign in Europe. Why would you be likely to see Baroque not only in Italy, where it was first created, but also in India and Peru?

Answer: Due to rapid colonization and religious spread

At this point in history, Europe continued to move outwards, exploring new parts of the world into the 16th and 17th century and bringing with them general aesthetics and religious belief. After the Renaissance, Baroque opted to make more dramatic buildings, often to demonstrate the worship and spread of Catholicism; the movement started in Italy.

While these structures emerged all around Europe as far east as Moscow and as far north as Stockholm, it also made early appearances in Portuguese-occupied India and the cathedrals of Peru, Ecuador, and Argentina, mainly due to rapid colonization and missionary efforts around the globe.
4. Expressionist architecture, which started at the beginning of the twentieth century, was considered a stylistic response created as a result of which major event?

Answer: World War I

Although this was a time of technological advancement, particularly in the way of entertainment (i.e., cinema), perhaps the biggest influence on the Expressionists was World War I which, while providing for a darker view of the world at the time, opened up to the optimism of the Roaring Twenties. Architecture reflected this Modernist view as the decades wore on, especially in Germany, where an eagerness to branch out, innovate, and break free was apparent, at least until the reign of the Nazis and World War II when Expressionism was considered a major negative; the style took a fall until well after the Second World War ended. Famous Expressionist structures over the years have included the Sydney Opera House, the Bilbao Guggenheim, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles.
5. Constructivist architecture, preserving the general aesthetics of Communism, can primarily be found in what country?

Answer: Russia

As Communism grew in what was ultimately the Soviet Union, the interest in Constructivism also grew. This style, known for its social function as well as its fascination with lines and material, characterized the region until Stalin's major prominence in the 1930s. Nonetheless, this Russia-centric form of architecture was most definitely a sign of the times during the region's increasingly-red Modernist period.

The buildings of this era make great use of space with robust size and numerous windows.
6. Part of the Modernist school of art, what form of architecture, originally from Germany, did away with adornment to provide basic structures dedicated to functionality?

Answer: Bauhaus

Although Bauhaus became an important influence on European (specifically German) architecture shortly after World War I, the style was snuffed out at the advent of the Second World War, mainly due to its disfavour amongst the Nazis. The aesthetic of Bauhaus originated in a single school, Staatliches Bauhaus and soon spread, but the basic premise involved removing the gildings and overabundant flourishes of other Modernist styles (e.g., Art Deco) to provide structures of both appealing form and function; builders simply built to accomplish the act of building.
7. Balance and volume were the main focus of International Style, the influence of which spanned several decades in the mid-twentieth century. Which of these buildings was not part of this movement?

Answer: Petronas Towers, Kuala Lumpur

International Style was, like others of the same era, a response to the garishness of Modernist aesthetic. Instead of including the ornamentation and gilding of the 1920s, this movement focused on providing simple, sizable, functional buildings. What resulted was a number of (what some have considered) sterile, boxy landmarks though, over time, they have shaped skylines in many cities in North America. The International Style became a standard in Canada and the U.S. (though it appeared worldwide) until waning in the 1970s.

The Petronas Towers, the twin towers of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia are Postmodern structures.
8. Which of these inspirations is frequently seen in structures built in Art Deco style?

Answer: Technology

Art Deco emerged before and during World War II at a time when innovation was almost certainly on the rise. Although much of the globe was struggling with economic depression and downturn, mass production and industrialization had already made their mark; Art Deco was a reflection of this, exemplified in straight angles, perfect symmetries, and a certain boldness to decor.

It was of particular importance to the development of New York City but it can be found all around the world from the Empire State Building and 30 Rock in New York to the commerce buildings in Mumbai, India to El Cristo Redentor in Brazil. Miami, Florida in particular is known for its heavy use of Art Deco in its structures though with different colour palettes.
9. Deconstructivism, a tributary of Postmodern architecture, is known for its box-shaped buildings and uniformity.

Answer: False

Taking a leaf from the book of Expressionist architecture, deconstructivists strove to break themselves away from the norm, exploring the general feel of a building and experimenting with typical form and structure. As such, many Expressionist buildings (like those by Frank Gehry) also take elements from Deconstructivism.

These buildings are not cookie-cutter; they are often abstract, formed by odd shapes and styles, and singularly unique.
10. Which of these features would typically be seen on a building made with Sustainable Architecture in mind?

Answer: Solar panels

With rising ecological concerns at the turn of the century, architects turned to creating multi-use structures, some of which would act as eco-friendly residences and commercial buildings. Solar panels, greenhouses, and recycled materials are all major additions in this generation (though not all are necessary); the general goal is to create sustainable environments which reduce emissions, create energy, etc. Buildings around the world, from New York to China and everywhere in between, have collected rainwater, made their own energy, and recreated the standard for 'green building'.
Source: Author kyleisalive

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