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Quiz about The Wondrous Works of Alfred Hitchcock
Quiz about The Wondrous Works of Alfred Hitchcock

The Wondrous Works of Alfred Hitchcock Quiz


Before coming to America in 1939, Alfred Hitchcock had established himself as one of the best in the business. He directed over 30 movies in Europe, and more than 25 in Hollywood. Let's see what you know about "The Master of Suspense" and his films.

A multiple-choice quiz by paulmallon. Estimated time: 8 mins.
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Author
paulmallon
Time
8 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
355,728
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
633
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Johnmcmanners (10/10), Hayes1953 (5/10), Guest 23 (5/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Alfred Hitchcock's first Hollywood film was "Rebecca" (1940). Based on the book of the same name written by London born novelist Daphne du Maurier, the film turned out to be a smash success. "Rebecca" received 11 Academy Award nominations, including Lawrence Olivier for Best Actor. "Rebecca" also received the nomination for Best Actress. Which classy actress played the leading female role? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. "Lifeboat" (1944), a film set entirely in the Atlantic Ocean during World War II, is the story of the fight to survive for nine people thrust together in a lifeboat. Most of them were on a ship that was torpedoed by a German U-boat. They must deal with storm-tossed seas, caring for the wounded, dwindling supplies of food and water, and ultimately making the difficult decision of who should be allowed to stay aboard and live and who should die. A likely candidate to get tossed is Willi, a German seaman they plucked from the sea and who was on the U-boat that torpedoed them. It was a pretty small cast so can you recall who played the nasty Nazi? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Just four years before leaving home to come to America, Hitchcock directed "The 39 Steps" (1935). It is one of the most famous films he directed in England. The spy thriller, about an innocent man being chased down for a murder he didn't commit, starred Robert Donat and Madeleine Carroll. As per his idiosyncratic trademark of making a very brief appearance in his flicks, sure enough Hitch once again managed to find a way to pop up in this one. What was his cameo role in this movie? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. "To Catch a Thief" (1955) starred the suave, debonair Cary Grant and the glamorous Grace Kelly in a light-hearted mystery set in Europe. A cat burglar is operating at an alarming rate, and the police notice the modus operandi is similar to one John Robie (Cary Grant), whom they seek to question. In what part of Europe do the police set out to catch a thief? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. In the pulse-pounding suspense film "The Man Who Knew Too Much" (1956), we meet a typical American family on vacation abroad. James Stewart is Dr. Ben McKenna, Doris Day is his perky wife, Jo, and they are accompanied by their son, Hank (Christopher Olsen). What can go wrong, right? Wrong. A dying man tells Ben about an assassination plot against a foreign diplomat, and others want to stop the good doctor before he can alert the authorities. In what European capital is the hit supposed to take place? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. In 1954, "The Master of Suspense" brought us the claustrophobic thriller "Rear Window". It starred James Stewart as L.B. Jeffries, a professional photographer who spends most of the film recuperating from a broken leg. Bored out of his mind, he passes his wheelchair bound days by observing the courtyard below his apartment, as well as the other residents. In time, he is convinced that one of his neighbors has killed his bedridden wife and disposed of her corpus delicti. The actor who played the hulking neighbor that Jeffries suspects of the murder, Lars Thorwald, would later star in a famous series. Name this thespian. Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. A year before moving to America, Alfred Hitchcock directed his next-to-last European film, "The Lady Vanishes" (1938). It's a comedy-mystery revolving around a trainful of people bound for England who get delayed by an avalanche, and must spend a night in the (fictional) countryside of Bandrika. While there, one of the passengers, a Miss Froy, is thought to have witnessed a murder. After someone unsuccessfully attempts to kill her but fails, she gets back on the train and promptly disappears. Who played the vanishing Miss Froy? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. In one of Hitchcock's dark comedies, "The Trouble with Harry" is that he is no longer among the living. After his body is found on a local hillside, several townfolk each believe that they are somehow the person who knocked him off. Naturally none of them want the body found or any questions leading back to them from the local sheriff. Unbeknownst to each other, a series of burials, exhumations, burials, exhumations ensue. The cast that included John Forsythe and veteran Edmund Gwenn also marked the film debuts of a future famous actor and actress. The actor was young Jerry ("The Beaver") Mathers. Who was the debuting damsel? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. In 1963 Hitchcock came up with an idea that was for "The Birds". Well, actually the idea originated in a short story written by Daphne du Maurier which was first released in 1952. "The Birds" tells the chilling tale of frenzied attacks by our formerly fine-feathered friends. For no apparent reasons thousands of birds begin attacking people creating panic and death among the populous in northern California. In "The Birds", Tippi Hedren played in her first Hitchcock directed film. Who played the lead male role? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. No quiz about the wondrous works of Alfred Hitchcock would be complete without including "Psycho" (1960). Filmed in B&W, it grossed $40,000,000 after a cost of $800,000 and was his highest grossing film (and perhaps his most famous as well). The story line is about a secretary who purloins $40,000 from her boss and then skips town. The search for her leads her sister and a private investigator to the Bates Motel (Norman Bates, Prop.), where she had stayed a night after being forced to rest after driving all evening in a blinding rainstorm. Most folks know Janet Leigh played the stealing secretary, Marion Crane, and that Vera Miles played the sister who hired a P.I. to help find her. Who played private investigator Milton Arbogast? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Alfred Hitchcock's first Hollywood film was "Rebecca" (1940). Based on the book of the same name written by London born novelist Daphne du Maurier, the film turned out to be a smash success. "Rebecca" received 11 Academy Award nominations, including Lawrence Olivier for Best Actor. "Rebecca" also received the nomination for Best Actress. Which classy actress played the leading female role?

Answer: Joan Fontaine

Joan Fontaine didn't have to wait long to win an Oscar, taking the prize the following year for her work in "Suspicion" (1941). Hitchcock was her director in that film as well. Hard as it may be to believe, Alfred Hitchcock never won a Best Director Academy Award despite being nominated five times.

Ms. Fontaine was beaten for the 1940 Oscar by Ginger Rogers in "Kitty Foyle".
2. "Lifeboat" (1944), a film set entirely in the Atlantic Ocean during World War II, is the story of the fight to survive for nine people thrust together in a lifeboat. Most of them were on a ship that was torpedoed by a German U-boat. They must deal with storm-tossed seas, caring for the wounded, dwindling supplies of food and water, and ultimately making the difficult decision of who should be allowed to stay aboard and live and who should die. A likely candidate to get tossed is Willi, a German seaman they plucked from the sea and who was on the U-boat that torpedoed them. It was a pretty small cast so can you recall who played the nasty Nazi?

Answer: Walter Slezak

Hitchcock's small but select cast included Hume Cronyn, William Bendix, John Hodiak, and Tallulah Bankhead. "Lifeboat" was nominated for three Academy Awards, including Hitch for Best Director. Alas, he lost out to Leo McCarey for his direction of Bing Crosby and Barry Fitzgerald in "Going My Way".
Otto Preminger is a renowned Hollywood director, Werner Klemperer was "Kommandant Klink" on the TV show "Hogan's Heroes" (1965-1971), and Martin Kaymer is a German professional golfer.

Austrian born Walter Slezak appeared in over 100 films. He made his Hollywood debut in "Once Upon a Honeymoon" (1942), which starred Cary Grant and Ginger Rogers.
3. Just four years before leaving home to come to America, Hitchcock directed "The 39 Steps" (1935). It is one of the most famous films he directed in England. The spy thriller, about an innocent man being chased down for a murder he didn't commit, starred Robert Donat and Madeleine Carroll. As per his idiosyncratic trademark of making a very brief appearance in his flicks, sure enough Hitch once again managed to find a way to pop up in this one. What was his cameo role in this movie?

Answer: He was a litter-bugging pedestrian.

The movie was based on a 1915 novel, "The Thirty-Nine Steps", by the prolific English author John Buchan. The British Film Institute (BFI) named it the fourth best British film of all-time (1999). Rated ahead of it were third place finisher "Lawrence of Arabia" (1962), runner-up "Brief Encounter" (1945) and at the top of the heap was "The Third Man" (1949).

Hitchcock didn't keep the audience in suspense too long awaiting his cameo appearance. After just six minutes and fifty-six seconds into the film, Hitch can be seen tossing a pack of cigarettes to the ground as a bus pulls away.
4. "To Catch a Thief" (1955) starred the suave, debonair Cary Grant and the glamorous Grace Kelly in a light-hearted mystery set in Europe. A cat burglar is operating at an alarming rate, and the police notice the modus operandi is similar to one John Robie (Cary Grant), whom they seek to question. In what part of Europe do the police set out to catch a thief?

Answer: France

To be precise it was the French Riviera. Robie claims to be a retired jewel thief, content with being an honest vintner, but the coppers aren't buying it. As he flees the gendarmes he seeks safe harbor among his old pals from the French Resistance. In order to attempt to convince the authorities that he's innocent, he feels he needs to capture the real cat burglar. But could it be just a game of cat and mouse that Robie is playing in order to draw suspicion away from him? Grace Kelly, in her third and final Hitchcock film, plays Grant's love interest, Francie Stevens. The following year she would take on a much different role: Princess of Monacco. The film won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography (Robert Burks), and the sensual tension smoldering between the two stars earned Cary Grant and Grace Kelly eighth place on Moviefone's list of The Top 25 Sexiest Movie Couples (2008).

Interesting fact: I don't think I'm giving anything away by saying there was a car chase in the film. Ironically, in 1982 Grace Kelly died in a car crash on a portion of the same road used for the chase in the film.
5. In the pulse-pounding suspense film "The Man Who Knew Too Much" (1956), we meet a typical American family on vacation abroad. James Stewart is Dr. Ben McKenna, Doris Day is his perky wife, Jo, and they are accompanied by their son, Hank (Christopher Olsen). What can go wrong, right? Wrong. A dying man tells Ben about an assassination plot against a foreign diplomat, and others want to stop the good doctor before he can alert the authorities. In what European capital is the hit supposed to take place?

Answer: London

"The Man Who Knew Too Much" was the only Alfred Hitchcock directed film in the career of Doris Day (who had good sense to change her birth moniker of Doris Mary Ann von Kapplelhoff). By the way, the actress who appeared in the most Hitchcock films, six, was Clare Greet. All were shot on the other side of the pond before Hitch hitched his star to Hollywood. "The Man Who Knew Too Much" won the Academy Award for Best Song for "Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera") and Doris Day took that tune to number two on the U.S. Pop Chart.

One of the most distinctive buildings in all of London, the Royal Albert Hall, is seen prominently in the latter part of the film. It was opened by Queen Victoria in 1871.
6. In 1954, "The Master of Suspense" brought us the claustrophobic thriller "Rear Window". It starred James Stewart as L.B. Jeffries, a professional photographer who spends most of the film recuperating from a broken leg. Bored out of his mind, he passes his wheelchair bound days by observing the courtyard below his apartment, as well as the other residents. In time, he is convinced that one of his neighbors has killed his bedridden wife and disposed of her corpus delicti. The actor who played the hulking neighbor that Jeffries suspects of the murder, Lars Thorwald, would later star in a famous series. Name this thespian.

Answer: Raymond Burr

Aided by his girlfriend, Lisa Freemont (Grace Kelly), they try to discover evidence to confirm his suspicions. "Rear Window" garnered four Oscar nominations, including Hitchcock once again. Broderick Crawford later starred in "Highway Patrol" (1955-1959), James Arness was Marshall Dillon on "Gunsmoke" (1955-1975), and Lorne Greene was Ben Cartwright on "Bonanza" (1959-1973). Raymond Burr starred in two popular series - "Perry Mason" (1957-1966), and as former San Francisco detective Robert "Ironside" (1967-1975).

On the big screen Raymond Burr has the dubious honor of being nominated for a Razzie Award for Worst Supporting Actor for "Godzilla 1985: The Legend is Reborn". He was happy to "lose" to Rob Lowe ("St. Elmo's Fire").
7. A year before moving to America, Alfred Hitchcock directed his next-to-last European film, "The Lady Vanishes" (1938). It's a comedy-mystery revolving around a trainful of people bound for England who get delayed by an avalanche, and must spend a night in the (fictional) countryside of Bandrika. While there, one of the passengers, a Miss Froy, is thought to have witnessed a murder. After someone unsuccessfully attempts to kill her but fails, she gets back on the train and promptly disappears. Who played the vanishing Miss Froy?

Answer: May Whitty

Margaret Lockwood plays Iris Henderson, a young lady heading to England for her wedding, and Michael Redgrave and Paul Lukas help round out the cast. The film was based on a 1936 novel, "The Wheel Spins", written by Ethel White.
The last movie that Hitchcock directed in Europe was "Jamaica Inn" (1939).

In 1918, Ms. Whitty became Dame May Whitty, when she was named the first actress to receive the title of Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE).
8. In one of Hitchcock's dark comedies, "The Trouble with Harry" is that he is no longer among the living. After his body is found on a local hillside, several townfolk each believe that they are somehow the person who knocked him off. Naturally none of them want the body found or any questions leading back to them from the local sheriff. Unbeknownst to each other, a series of burials, exhumations, burials, exhumations ensue. The cast that included John Forsythe and veteran Edmund Gwenn also marked the film debuts of a future famous actor and actress. The actor was young Jerry ("The Beaver") Mathers. Who was the debuting damsel?

Answer: Shirley MacLaine

The movie was based on the story of the same name written by British novelist Jack Trevor Story (1949). The quirky Hitchcock refused to use a dummy to play the role of the dearly departed Harry Worp. His insistence on using a "live" actor led to Philip Truex getting the part (alas, he was not listed in the film's credits).
Carolyn Jones would later play a small part in "The Man Who Knew Too Much" (1956). A funny anecdote about the film's making: believing the Vermont hills to be at their peak foliage, The Green Mountain State was the chosen locale... then one big "OOPS". When the crew arrived they found out that most of the leaves had already shed and hit the ground. As a bit of proof that "necessity is the mother of invention", the crew promptly began the task of gluing the already fallen leaves back on the trees. While "Harry" was not a smash hit at the box office, Hitchcock has said it was one of the favorite films that he directed.

Shirley MacLaine would later win the Academy Award for Best Actress for her portrayal of Aurora Greenway in "Terms of Endearment" (1983).
9. In 1963 Hitchcock came up with an idea that was for "The Birds". Well, actually the idea originated in a short story written by Daphne du Maurier which was first released in 1952. "The Birds" tells the chilling tale of frenzied attacks by our formerly fine-feathered friends. For no apparent reasons thousands of birds begin attacking people creating panic and death among the populous in northern California. In "The Birds", Tippi Hedren played in her first Hitchcock directed film. Who played the lead male role?

Answer: Rod Taylor

"The Birds" is set mostly in the port town of Bodega Bay, about 60 miles north of San Francisco. For reasons unknown, ravens, crows, and seagulls among others begin the onslaught there. Among the early victims are Melanie Daniels (Hedren) and her friend Mitch Brenner (Taylor). Other traumatized members of the cast include Suzanne Pleshette and Jessica Tandy. It was Hitchcock's first film for Universal Studios and it was a huge financial success, grossing over $11 million. Hitchcock would direct Ms. Hedren once again the following year, in "Marnie". Tippi Hedren is the mother of Golden Globe winning actress Melanie Griffith ("Working Girl") (1988).

Interesting fact: Australian born Rod Taylor portrayed British Prime Minister Winston Chuchill in 2009's "Inglourious Basterds".
10. No quiz about the wondrous works of Alfred Hitchcock would be complete without including "Psycho" (1960). Filmed in B&W, it grossed $40,000,000 after a cost of $800,000 and was his highest grossing film (and perhaps his most famous as well). The story line is about a secretary who purloins $40,000 from her boss and then skips town. The search for her leads her sister and a private investigator to the Bates Motel (Norman Bates, Prop.), where she had stayed a night after being forced to rest after driving all evening in a blinding rainstorm. Most folks know Janet Leigh played the stealing secretary, Marion Crane, and that Vera Miles played the sister who hired a P.I. to help find her. Who played private investigator Milton Arbogast?

Answer: Martin Balsam

The iconic role of Norman Bates was played by Anthony Perkins. "Psycho" brought Alfred Hitchcock his fifth and final nomination for the Best Director Oscar and his fifth disappointment as well. (Billy Wilder won for "The Apartment"). Just how great and scary was this film? Well, the AFI has all kinds of lists and here is where "Psycho" ranked on some of them:
AFI's 100 Years... 100 Movies - ranked number 18.
AFI's 100 Years... 100 Movies (10th anniversary edition) - ranked number 14.
AFI's 100 Years... 100 Heroes and Villains - Norman Bates ranked number two Villain, behind only Hannibal Lecter in "Silence of the Lambs" (1991).
AFI's 100 Years... 100 Thrills - RANKED NUMBER ONE!
And now for some much needed levity: "Psycho" was the first American made film to have the temerity of showing a toilet bowl actually flushing. The nerve!

Martin Balsam won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of Arnold Burns in "A Thousand Clowns" (1965).
Source: Author paulmallon

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