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Quiz about Amadeus  The Maestro
Quiz about Amadeus  The Maestro

Amadeus - The Maestro Trivia Quiz


Many people dismiss Mozart as being a shallow composer, but this, in large part, falls on the fact that many only hear the more simple compositions that play nicely in elevators. Mozart, however, to me, was perhaps the most ingenious composer ever.

A multiple-choice quiz by TemplarLLM. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
TemplarLLM
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
53,963
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
2252
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Question 1 of 10
1. Frequently misstated, what was the younger Mozart's full name? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Which of the following monarchs did Mozart NOT perform for during his tours as a child, between 1762 and 1766? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. What did the Pope give Mozart during a visit to Rome at the age of 14? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Between 1761 and 1791, how many musical compositions is Mozart known to have composed? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Who was it that said the following to Mozart's father: 'Mozart is the greatest composer known to me in person or by name; he has taste and, what is more, the greatest knowledge of composition'?

Answer: (First and last name or just last name - Think Quartet)
Question 6 of 10
6. Whom did Mozart compete against in a pianoforte contest before Emperor Joseph II in 1781? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Which of Mozart's operas achieved the most success during his lifetime? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Ok, one question in here to throw you out of whack a little bit. So far, everything here has been biographical information, so let's really pull a sly one. Which of the following movies did NOT feature a Mozart composition? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Where and when did Mozart die? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Mozart was buried in an unmarked grave in Vienna. Why was he buried in such a fashion? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Frequently misstated, what was the younger Mozart's full name?

Answer: Johannes Chrysostomos Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart

Mozart was born on 27 January 1756, at 8 p.m to his parents, Johann Georg Leopold Mozart ('Leopold') and Anna Maria Mozart (nee Pertl) in Salzburg (now in present day Austria, but at the time an independent city-state, which was an ecclesiastical principality, meaning that it was governed by a prince-archbishop). Most people today refer to Mozart as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, which, although incorrect, is close to an interpretation of his actual name. Johannes was provided in honour of his father, who although called Leopold by all who knew him was actually a Johann.

This name was later dropped by both Amadeus and everybody else. Chrisostomos derives from St. John Chrysostom, whose saint's day Mozart was born on (a common practice even today). Wolfgang was the name of Mozart's maternal grandfather and Theophilus means 'beloved of God', which in Latin translates as Amadeus. Mozart later signed his name as 'Wolfgang Amade Mozart', which is where the modern mistake arises from. If you think Wolfie's name is a bit of a mouthful, wait until you hear his wife's name....Maria Constanze Caecilia Josepha Johanna Aloisia Weber!
2. Which of the following monarchs did Mozart NOT perform for during his tours as a child, between 1762 and 1766?

Answer: Catherine II (Catherine the Great)

Mozart played his first royal show in January 1762 at the age of five (almost six). The trip was to nearby Munich, where Wolfgangerl (as his family called him) and his sister, Maria Anna Walburga Ignatia Mozart (or Nannerl to the family), played before the Elector of Bavaria.

This was to be one of Mozart's shortest childhood trips, culminating within three weeks. For the latter part of 1762, Mozart and his sister were taken off to Vienna, where they stayed a number of months delighting the aristocracy, most notably Emperor Joseph II and Empress Maria Theresa.

In 1763, the Mozart family went on tour again, this time, with Versailles as their ultimate goal, although they played many stops along the way. The Mozarts played in Paris for Queen Maria Leszczynska and Louis XV and in fact were honoured with an invitation to the court dinner on New Year's Day, 1763.

The family was further honoured, and gained great publicity, by being asked to stand by the royal table, where Maria conversed with Amadeus and fed him from her plate (sounds a little like a puppy, doesn't it).

In 1764, the Mozarts jumped the channel and stayed awhile in England, where they played before King George III and Queen Charlotte. They left England in 1765 and headed to the Low Countries (where the present day Netherlands and Belgium stand), where Amadeus performed before Prince William V of Orange in a solo performance (his sister having contracted typhoid). The Mozarts returned home to Salzburg in 1766 after Wolfgangerl himself also contracted typhoid. This was the end of Mozart's first real road tour (although he would continue to travel and play for another 14 years before finally settling in Vienna). Mozart was to suffer a number of illnesses throughout his life, many of which started while he toured Europe as a young boy. Although Catherine the Great did rule Russia during the years that Mozart travelled throughout Europe (she ruled from 1762-1796 after overthrowing and killing her husband Peter III), she never saw a performance by the child-wonder.
3. What did the Pope give Mozart during a visit to Rome at the age of 14?

Answer: A knighthood

Although Mozart was indeed knighted by Pope Clement XIV in July 1770, little appears to have been made of this during the remainder of his life. The actual honour bestowed upon Mozart was the cross of the Order of the Golden Spur. The Pope had performed a similar act, when he had conferred a knighthood upon Christoph Gluck fourteen years earlier. Whereas Gluck, however, thereafter referred to himself as Chevalier de Gluck or Ritter von Gluck, Mozart does not seem to have penned such a title for himself, except for a very brief period following the knighthood, wherein he signed his name as Cavaliere Amadeo on the orders of his father.

The signature fizzled away in a very brief period of time though.
4. Between 1761 and 1791, how many musical compositions is Mozart known to have composed?

Answer: Over 230

Starting in early 1761, at the age of five, Mozart composed his first piece, 'Andante in C'. That first year he would compose a total of two pieces, the other being 'Allegro in F'. In the space of thirty years, Mozart would become prolific producing 235 pieces, including a hefty body of operas (which although only counting as one 'composition', would often include numerous arias, adagios and so on. If one was to include each actual piece within his operas and some of his more lengthy composition, the above number would be greatly magnified).

This meant that on average, Mozart composed just under eight compositions a year (7.8888. to be more exact) from the age of five to thirty-five. Of course, in some years he completed far more, for instance in 1772 he completed fifteen compositions and in 1786, he completed 16 (including two operas)! Even in the year of his death he composed eleven compositions (again including two operas) and what turned out to be his own requiem (although it was completed by his student, Sussmayr).
5. Who was it that said the following to Mozart's father: 'Mozart is the greatest composer known to me in person or by {name;} he has taste and, what is more, the greatest knowledge of composition'?

Answer: Haydn

Around 1780, Mozart was summoned to Vienna by his employer of the time, the Prince-Archbishop of Salzburg, Hieronymus von Colloredo. After a dispute between Mozart and the Prince-Archbishop over the Prince-Archbishop's refusal to let Mozart perform in front of the Holy Roman Emperor, Joseph II (whose court was established in Vienna as well) and the Prince-Archbishop's treatment of Mozart as a menial servant, Mozart either quit or was fired from his position.

This turned out to be quite beneficial to Mozart, who then made his living teaching, publishing, composing by commission and by public recitals.

His income was actually very good for his position (despite recent depictions of an under-worked and impoverished Mozart), but poor financial acumen and expensive tastes frequently corroded his earnings. Mozart's reputation was well-known throughout Vienna and highly regarded (except that some of his music was deemed too elaborate, the Emperor once remarking 'too many notes, my dear Mozart').

He even adopted other musicians styles, at one point composing six string quartets which he dedicated to Haydn, a pioneer and master of the quartet and a man that Mozart often referred to as 'dear friend'. Haydn was obviously appreciative, as witnessed by his commentary to Leopold. Oddly enough, Mozart's style and brilliance would become the major influence in Haydn's own style and later in Beethoven's.
6. Whom did Mozart compete against in a pianoforte contest before Emperor Joseph II in 1781?

Answer: Muzio Clementi

Muzio Clementi and Mozart competed against each other to perform the most exhilarating pianoforte before Emperor Joseph II in December of 1781. Clementi played a personal composition, a piano sonata in B-flat major, but was outdone by Mozart who instead pumped out a strong series of variations and won the day. Clementi was also somewhat of a child prodigy.

At the age of seven in 1759 he had begun his musical education and was so impressive that he secured his first job at the age of nine as an organist in Rome (where he was born).

He was adopted by an Englishman a few years later and became a celebrated pianist in England. It was during a European tour in 1781 that he was asked to compete against Mozart by the Emperor himself. Mozart never competed against Haydn, but actually developed a close friendship with him, dedicating, as noted above, a set of six quartets to Haydn in September, 1785. Ludwig van Beethoven was considerably influenced by Mozart's work and even studied under Mozart's tutelage in Vienna during April, 1787 for a two week period (Beethoven was 16 at the time).

Although Salieri has been depicted as Mozart's arch-enemy in the movie 'Amadeus' and in some historical documents (which have suggested that he had a hand in poisoning Mozart), there is actually very little evidence of any real interaction between the two at all. He was in Vienna at the time that Mozart arrived though, having been court composer since 1774 and Kapellmeister in 1788. Beethoven, as well as studying under Mozart, also studied under Salieri, as did Liszt and Schubert.
7. Which of Mozart's operas achieved the most success during his lifetime?

Answer: Le Nozze Di Figaro

Mozart composed 'The Marriage of Figaro' in 1786 for the Vienna Opera and it garnered the most success out of all of his operas while he was still alive (today, it might be a tough call, considering that all of his operas tend to be keenly awaited), even though it led, in large part, to a decline in Mozart's popularity.

It was first performed at the Burgtheater, in Vienna on May 1, 1786. The reason why 'Figaro' ended up doing more damage than good to Mozart's reputation was due to the storyline. Essentially, a Count is chasing after his wife's maid, despite the fact that the maid is the fiancee of the Count's valet, Figaro. Figaro, throughout the opera, foils the Count's attempts to seduce or ravage his fiancee. Such a depiction scared the aristocracy, because it showed that the nobility was susceptible to being outdone by their servants or the lower classes.

Not a popular theme considering the revolution that had occurred in the English American colonies and the general unrest felt throughout Europe at that time. 'Don Giovanni' (completed for the Prague Opera, a city where Mozart's opera in general was to do exceptionally well) was composed in 1787 and was almost as popular upon its presentation as 'Figaro'. 'Cosi Fan Tutte' was finished in 1790 and 'The Magic Flute' in 1791 (for a Vienna suburban Opera).
8. Ok, one question in here to throw you out of whack a little bit. So far, everything here has been biographical information, so let's really pull a sly one. Which of the following movies did NOT feature a Mozart composition?

Answer: Platoon

Ok, ok, so I might not know the exact scenes where the music played, but if you know the specific scene, send me a message and I'll try and amend this info. box. 'Trading Places', which debuted in 1983, featured a scene where the 'Marriage of Figaro' overture blared throughout (I think this may have been when we see inside the Old boy's World at the brokerage house at the beginning of the movie). 'Bonfire of the Vanities', released in 1990, featured both Mozart's 'Eine Kleine Nachtmusik' and 'Don Giovanni'. 'The French Lieutenant's Woman', released in 1982, featured 'Piano Sonata K576'. 'Platoon', released in 1986, didn't feature any Mozart, but it did include Barber's 'Adagio for Strings'.
9. Where and when did Mozart die?

Answer: Vienna, December 5, 1791

Mozart died while composing a Requiem for an unidentified beneficiary. The movie that came out concerning Mozart's life, 'Amadeus', is partially correct in this story. Mozart was visited by a masked man, but it has been determined that it was not Salieri (who it has subsequently been discovered had very very little interaction with Mozart).

The masked man is still unknown, although recent arguments and evidence have narrowed it down to a probable handful of aristocrats. At the time of the request, Mozart was already beginning to show symptoms of an oncoming bout of illness, of which he had suffered many times throughout his life. Most of the illnesses that Mozart did suffer from are thought to have been continued recurrences of illnesses picked during his travels as a child. One of the symptoms that he suffered from while writing the requiem was a fever, and this and exhaustion may well have contributed to the idea that Mozart formed that he was writing his own requiem.

His prophecy turned out to be correct and he died shortly before one in the morning of December 5, 1791.

The most probable cause of his death is rheumatic fever, an illness that had recurred on a number of occasions.
10. Mozart was buried in an unmarked grave in Vienna. Why was he buried in such a fashion?

Answer: Prevailing local custom

Mozart's funeral took place in Saint Stephen's Cathedral and he was subsequently buried in the cemetery of Saint Marx, a Viennese suburb. The movie 'Amadeus' and many other sources of information about Mozart have tried to depict the reasoning for this as being that Mozart was impoverished at the time of his death and that the most that his family could afford was a simple pauper's death.

This is in fact a fallacy, Mozart was not of noble birth and in Vienna at that time, the method of Mozart's burial was actually a legal requirement for any body not born into the aristocracy.
Source: Author TemplarLLM

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