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Quiz about When I Found Hed Left Me In The Lurch
Quiz about When I Found Hed Left Me In The Lurch

When I Found He'd Left Me In The Lurch Quiz


Most music hall songs were quickly forgotten, but here are some that stood the test of time. See if you can play along without singing along.

A multiple-choice quiz by dellastreet. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
dellastreet
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
368,225
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
180
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. "There was I, waiting at the church,
Waiting at the church, waiting at the church
When I found he'd left me in the lurch
Lor how it did upset me!"

This music hall favourite, made famous by Vesta Victoria, was quoted in a momentous speech made in 1978 by the British Prime Minister of the time. Who was he?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. "Champagne Charlie is my name
Champagne drinking is my game
There is nothing quite like fizz, fizz, fizz
I'll drink every drop there is, is, is"

One of the first music hall songs to take the country by storm, "Champagne Charlie" was reputedly sung by the crowd at Britain's last public execution in 1868. George Leybourne, the man who made it famous, was portrayed in the 1944 film "Champagne Charlie" by which Cockney comedian?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. "We've been together now for forty years
And it don't seem a day too much
There ain't a lady living in the land
As I'd swop for my dear old dutch"

The music hall artist who popularised this song was in fact a former legitimate actor of non-English ancestry. That didn't prevent him from starting the tradition of coster (Cockney trader) songs. Who was he?
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. "Any old iron, any old iron
Any, any, any old iron
You look neat, talk about a treat
You look dapper from your napper to your feet"

Peter Sellers entered the UK charts in 1957 with his version of this song, but which music hall legend originally made it famous? (He must have known he was on to a winner.)
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. "I'm for ever blowing bubbles
Pretty bubbles in the air
They fly so high, nearly reach the sky
Then like my dreams they fade and die"

This American song was first heard in the Broadway musical "The Passing Show of 1918", but later became popular in the British music halls. It is now associated with which London football club?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. "I'm 'Enery The Eighth I am
'Enery The Eighth I am, I am
I got married to the widow next door
She's been married seven times before"

Sung by Patrick Swayze in the 1990 film "Ghost", this song had previously been an American chart-topper. Who sang it then?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. "I'm Burlington Bertie
I rise at ten-thirty
And saunter along like a toff
I walk down the Strand with my gloves on my hands
Then I walk down again with them off"

Long a favourite with male impersonators, "Burlington Bertie From Bow" was introduced by Ella Shields in 1915. It name-checks a 19th century British Prime Minister - which one?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. "As I walk along the Bois de Boulogne
With an independent air
You can hear the girls declare
He must be a millionaire!"

Featured in the films "The Magnificent Ambersons" and "Lawrence of Arabia", the song "The Man Who Broke The Bank At Monte Carlo" was popularised by which music hall artist?
Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. "Come, come, come and make eyes at me
Down at the Old Bull and Bush
Come, come, drink some port wine with me
Down at the Old Bull and Bush"

Originally an American beer garden song commissioned by the Anheuser-Busch brewing company, "Down at the Old Bull and Bush" formed part of the repertoire of Australian artiste Florrie Forde. It was always sung at the end of which long-running British TV show?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. "My old man said follow the van
And don't dilly-dally on the way
Off went the van with my home packed in it
I walked behind with my old cock linnet"

Which British Prime Minister, himself the son of a music hall entertainer, wrote a history of the music hall entitled "My Old Man"?
Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. "There was I, waiting at the church, Waiting at the church, waiting at the church When I found he'd left me in the lurch Lor how it did upset me!" This music hall favourite, made famous by Vesta Victoria, was quoted in a momentous speech made in 1978 by the British Prime Minister of the time. Who was he?

Answer: James Callaghan

"All at once he sent me round a note,
Here's the very note, this is what he wrote,
Can't get away to marry you today,
My wife won't let me!"

James Callaghan had been expected to call a general election and quoted the song when announcing that he didn't plan to do so. His minority Labour government subsequently lost a vote of no confidence and the ensuing election was won by Margaret Thatcher's Conservatives. As well as perhaps displaying poor political judgement, Callaghan misattributed the song to Marie Lloyd.

On stage from childhood, Vesta Victoria was also famous for singing "Daddy Wouldn't Buy Me A Bow-Wow".
2. "Champagne Charlie is my name Champagne drinking is my game There is nothing quite like fizz, fizz, fizz I'll drink every drop there is, is, is" One of the first music hall songs to take the country by storm, "Champagne Charlie" was reputedly sung by the crowd at Britain's last public execution in 1868. George Leybourne, the man who made it famous, was portrayed in the 1944 film "Champagne Charlie" by which Cockney comedian?

Answer: Tommy Trinder

"All round town it is the same
By Pop! Pop! Pop! I rose to fame
I'm the idol of the barmaids
Champagne Charlie is my name!"

The film "Champagne Charlie" portrays a rivalry between two "lions comiques" of the music hall, Leybourne, who became known as "Champagne Charlie", and the Great Vance, played by Stanley Holloway.

Another popular song of Leybourne's was "The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze". Both tunes feature in "Memories of Covent Garden", a waltz specially composed by Johann Strauss II for a visit to Britain in 1867.
3. "We've been together now for forty years And it don't seem a day too much There ain't a lady living in the land As I'd swop for my dear old dutch" The music hall artist who popularised this song was in fact a former legitimate actor of non-English ancestry. That didn't prevent him from starting the tradition of coster (Cockney trader) songs. Who was he?

Answer: Albert Chevalier

"I sees yer Sal -
Yer pretty ribbons sportin'
Many years now, old gal.
Since them old days of courtin'
I ain't a coward, still I trust
When we've to part, as part we must
That Death may come and take me fust
To wait .... my pal!"

The wonderfully named Albert Onesime Britannicus Gwathveoyd Louis Chevalier was the son of a French master and a Welsh mother. He married the daughter of George Leybourne of "Champagne Charlie" fame and is buried with him at Abney Park Cemetery in London.
4. "Any old iron, any old iron Any, any, any old iron You look neat, talk about a treat You look dapper from your napper to your feet" Peter Sellers entered the UK charts in 1957 with his version of this song, but which music hall legend originally made it famous? (He must have known he was on to a winner.)

Answer: Harry Champion

"Dressed in style, brand new tile
And your father's old blue tie on
Oh I wouldn't give you tuppence for your old watch chain
Old iron, old iron!"

Cockney comedian Harry Champion was noted for singing very fast, often about food. Out of retirement in 1940 he recorded a version of the song incorporating a request to listeners to contribute their old iron to the war effort.
5. "I'm for ever blowing bubbles Pretty bubbles in the air They fly so high, nearly reach the sky Then like my dreams they fade and die" This American song was first heard in the Broadway musical "The Passing Show of 1918", but later became popular in the British music halls. It is now associated with which London football club?

Answer: West Ham United

"Fortune's always hiding
I've looked everywhere
I'm for ever blowing bubbles
Pretty bubbles in the air"

"I'm For Ever Blowing Bubbles" became popular in Britain in the 1920s. There is some dispute as to when it was adopted by the West Ham fans.

"Any Old Iron" is played before Scunthorpe United matches and "Blaydon Races", the anthem of Newcastle United, also started off as a music hall song.
6. "I'm 'Enery The Eighth I am 'Enery The Eighth I am, I am I got married to the widow next door She's been married seven times before" Sung by Patrick Swayze in the 1990 film "Ghost", this song had previously been an American chart-topper. Who sang it then?

Answer: Herman's Hermits

"And everyone was an 'Enery
She wouldn't have a Willie or a Sam
I'm her eighth old man called 'Enery
'Enery the Eighth I am!"

First made famous by Harry Champion, this song was recorded by British pop star Joe Brown in 1961. A version by Herman's Hermits topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1965.
7. "I'm Burlington Bertie I rise at ten-thirty And saunter along like a toff I walk down the Strand with my gloves on my hands Then I walk down again with them off" Long a favourite with male impersonators, "Burlington Bertie From Bow" was introduced by Ella Shields in 1915. It name-checks a 19th century British Prime Minister - which one?

Answer: Lord Rosebery

"I'm all airs and graces, correct easy paces
So long without food I forgot where my face is
I'm Bert, Bert, I haven't a shirt
My people are well off you know
Nearly everyone knows me from Smith to Lord Rosebery
I'm Burlington Bertie from Bow"

Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery, was Prime Minister from 1894 to 1895 and was reputedly the richest man ever to hold the office.

The song was a parody of "Burlington Bertie", a now forgotten song associated with Vesta Tilley. In British betting parlance "Burlington Bertie" means odds of 10/3, or one hundred to thirty.
8. "As I walk along the Bois de Boulogne With an independent air You can hear the girls declare He must be a millionaire!" Featured in the films "The Magnificent Ambersons" and "Lawrence of Arabia", the song "The Man Who Broke The Bank At Monte Carlo" was popularised by which music hall artist?

Answer: Charles Coborn

"You can hear them sigh and wish to die
You can see them wink the other eye
At the man who broke the bank at Monte Carlo"

Written in 1892, the song was inspired by the exploits of a British gambler called Charles Wells.

Charles Coborn can be seen, aged 82, performing the song in both English and French in the 1934 British film "Say It With Flowers". Continuing the political subtext of this quiz, Coborn had a son who became a Conservative Member of Parliament.
9. "Come, come, come and make eyes at me Down at the Old Bull and Bush Come, come, drink some port wine with me Down at the Old Bull and Bush" Originally an American beer garden song commissioned by the Anheuser-Busch brewing company, "Down at the Old Bull and Bush" formed part of the repertoire of Australian artiste Florrie Forde. It was always sung at the end of which long-running British TV show?

Answer: The Good Old Days

"Do, do, come and have a drink or two
Down at the Old Bull and Bush"

Running from 1953 to 1983, "The Good Old Days" celebrated the days of the music hall, keeping many of these songs in the public memory. Recorded at the City Varieties Music Hall in Leeds, the show was chaired by actor Leonard Sachs, noted for his use of long words and alliteration. The acts and the audience all dressed up in period attire and joined "the entire and indefatigable orchestra" in a chorus of the closing song.
10. "My old man said follow the van And don't dilly-dally on the way Off went the van with my home packed in it I walked behind with my old cock linnet" Which British Prime Minister, himself the son of a music hall entertainer, wrote a history of the music hall entitled "My Old Man"?

Answer: John Major

"I dillied and dallied
I dallied and dillied
Lost my way and don't know where to roam
You can't trust a Special like the old-time coppers
When you can't find your way home"

John Major, who succeeded Margaret Thatcher as Prime Minister in 1990, was said to be the only man in history to have run away from the circus to become an accountant.

"My Old Man" was originally sung by music hall legend Marie Lloyd, who would merit a whole quiz to herself.
Source: Author dellastreet

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