Quiz about French Philosophers
Quiz about French Philosophers

French Philosophers Trivia Quiz


French philosophy is perhaps not as systematic as German or English philosophy, but is no less intriguing. I think St. Simon and Voltaire are my favorite philosophers from France...what about yourself?

A multiple-choice quiz by thejazzkickazz. Estimated time: 9 mins.
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Time
9 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
87,796
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
669
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Let's start off with the first modern philosopher in France. He was the fellow who suggested "Cogito ergo sum". Who was he?

Answer: (Cartesian)
2. The next person was a great mathematician as well, and he wagered that he would rather believe in God then lose his soul. Who was he?

Answer: (bete-Pensee)
3. A similar philosopher around the time of 1750, also believed that science could correct superstition and myths to such a degree that science itself ought to become a "theology". Who was he?

Answer: (F______ the 'cranial')
4. Another interesting person of this time circa 1750, was the author of the "Persian Letters". He satirized society and the Pope, calling him an old idol worshipped out of dutiful custom, and was quite cosmopolitan in his views. We might even call him an anthropologist who saw the dynamics of law and justice as natural relationships between nature, that ought to be found out and practiced naturally. Who are we speaking of?

Answer: (M_______ the spiritual one)
5. In 1750, he was invited by Frederick II of Prussia to Berlin where he worked on his marvelous "Philosophical Dictionary". He wrote that religion was a vehicle that divided mankind and promoted hatred between different cultures and that true religion was the brotherhood of mankind. Who was he?

Answer: (Not Marie-Arouet but...)
6. Like Condillac this author of "The Letter on the Blind" believed that all of our metaphysical conceptions were the result of sensations and our reactions to them. He was also a famous "Encyclopedist", aesthetic and drama critic all rolled up in one. Who was he?

Answer: (D____)
7. Known for many interesting works on the problem of evil and human nature, this fellow believed that "evil" was primarily the blind obeyance into certain societal workings and that returning to nature was the key to a person re-discovering their inherent good nature. Naturally, he was...?

Answer: (R______ the Wanderer)
8. He was a product of the Age of Enlightenment, authoring "Sketch for a Historical Picture" and the "Progress of the Human Mind". In these books he believed that increasing human knowledge was the key to improving society and the human race, yet he committed suicide whilst in jail after being tortured considerably by the Jacobins. Who was this ironic fellow?

Answer: (C_______ (one word name))
9. Publishing the work "Essay on the Generative Principle of Political Constitution" in 1810, this philosopher believed that instinct (intuition) was the key to understanding nature. His name was...?

Answer: (de M______)
10. He was born Claude Henri de Rouvroy. Born into great wealth, he participated in the American Independence, ran counter to the Reign of Terror, lost and regained his fortune several times, attempted suicide, and created a philosophic system based on the Organic function of a person. And of course died with a horde of disciples at his bed side...who do we better know him as?

Answer: (St. S____)

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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Let's start off with the first modern philosopher in France. He was the fellow who suggested "Cogito ergo sum". Who was he?

Answer: Descartes

In 1649 he joined the court of Queen Christina in Stockholm, where he died a year later...
2. The next person was a great mathematician as well, and he wagered that he would rather believe in God then lose his soul. Who was he?

Answer: Pascal

The 'Pensees', published posthumously, were his unfinished defence of Christianity.
3. A similar philosopher around the time of 1750, also believed that science could correct superstition and myths to such a degree that science itself ought to become a "theology". Who was he?

Answer: Fontanelle

He is known for some interesting works: "Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds".
4. Another interesting person of this time circa 1750, was the author of the "Persian Letters". He satirized society and the Pope, calling him an old idol worshipped out of dutiful custom, and was quite cosmopolitan in his views. We might even call him an anthropologist who saw the dynamics of law and justice as natural relationships between nature, that ought to be found out and practiced naturally. Who are we speaking of?

Answer: Montesquieu

We might even call him an anthropologist who saw the dynamics of law and justice as natural relationships between nature, that ought to be found out and practiced naturally.
5. In 1750, he was invited by Frederick II of Prussia to Berlin where he worked on his marvelous "Philosophical Dictionary". He wrote that religion was a vehicle that divided mankind and promoted hatred between different cultures and that true religion was the brotherhood of mankind. Who was he?

Answer: Voltaire

His 'Candide' reminds me of some of the fantastic tales of Chinese myth and legend, and he was a great admirer of Chinese culture...hmmm.
6. Like Condillac this author of "The Letter on the Blind" believed that all of our metaphysical conceptions were the result of sensations and our reactions to them. He was also a famous "Encyclopedist", aesthetic and drama critic all rolled up in one. Who was he?

Answer: Diderot

Diderot modeled the 'Encyclopedie' after Ephraim Chamber's English encyclopedia from earlier in the 18th C.
7. Known for many interesting works on the problem of evil and human nature, this fellow believed that "evil" was primarily the blind obeyance into certain societal workings and that returning to nature was the key to a person re-discovering their inherent good nature. Naturally, he was...?

Answer: Rousseau

'Emile', 'The Social Contract', and the 'Profession of Faith of a Savoyard Vicar' are some of his more interesting stuff.
8. He was a product of the Age of Enlightenment, authoring "Sketch for a Historical Picture" and the "Progress of the Human Mind". In these books he believed that increasing human knowledge was the key to improving society and the human race, yet he committed suicide whilst in jail after being tortured considerably by the Jacobins. Who was this ironic fellow?

Answer: Condorcet

9. Publishing the work "Essay on the Generative Principle of Political Constitution" in 1810, this philosopher believed that instinct (intuition) was the key to understanding nature. His name was...?

Answer: De Maistre

He did not believe that social reform and knowledge led to a better society, since nature was all about the struggle for existence.
10. He was born Claude Henri de Rouvroy. Born into great wealth, he participated in the American Independence, ran counter to the Reign of Terror, lost and regained his fortune several times, attempted suicide, and created a philosophic system based on the Organic function of a person. And of course died with a horde of disciples at his bed side...who do we better know him as?

Answer: St. Simon

Source: Author thejazzkickazz

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