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Quiz about Hanoverian Family Values
Quiz about Hanoverian Family Values

Hanoverian "Family Values" Trivia Quiz


While some did manage to have good relationships as well, all of the Hanoverian kings of England had problems of one sort or another with unruly relatives. How much do you know about this private (and sometimes very public) side of the Georgian royals?

A multiple-choice quiz by pele. Estimated time: 9 mins.
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Author
pele
Time
9 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
224,611
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
25
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
16 / 25
Plays
868
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 2 (22/25), PurpleComet (23/25), Guest 70 (22/25).
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Question 1 of 25
1. George I became King of England on the death of his distant cousin. There was once a suggestion that this couple marry, but Princess _____ could not stand George and refused to consider the matter. The scheme was abandoned and they both married other people. Who was destined to refuse to marry George, and yet was succeeded by him? Hint


Question 2 of 25
2. George I married his first cousin, the daughter of his father's brother. They came to hate one another, and George was particuarly vicious in the way she was treated. Who was this unfortunate woman? Hint


Question 3 of 25
3. George I divorced his wife and never re-married, although he did keep mistresses. One of these was an enormously fat woman whom George created Countess of Darlington, and whom rumour made out to be a close relative of his. How was she supposedly related to King George I? Hint


Question 4 of 25
4. George I and his son the future George II despised one another, but George II was very lucky in his marriage partner. Who was she? Hint


Question 5 of 25
5. Carrying on the family tradition of dislike for the eldest son, George II and his Queen could not bear the Prince of Wales. Who was referred to as "poor ______" by the people of England? Hint


Question 6 of 25
6. George II and his Queen much preferred their second son, the Duke of Cumberland. The Duke was destined to have a flower named after him in both Scotland and England. What was the popular Scottish name for the flower? Hint


Question 7 of 25
7. In August of 1737 the Prince of Wales had a spat with George II and his Queen, and insisted that his wife (who was in labour at the time) be moved from Hampton Court to St. James' Palace because he did not want his Mom and Dad to attend the birth of his eldest child. Who was his wife? Hint


Question 8 of 25
8. When the Prince of Wales died in 1751 George II wrote in his diary "I have lost my oldest son, but I was glad of it." What did the Prince die of? Hint


Question 9 of 25
9. When George III became King in 1760 he was the most eligible bachelor in Europe. A massive search for a suitable bride was made for him. Whom did he end up making his Queen? Hint


Question 10 of 25
10. George III was not his parents' favourite child, and he did not have an easy relationship with any of his siblings. In his early years as King, all three of his brothers caused him much embarrassment with their extravagant living and flagrant affairs, but in 1771 the actions of Henry, Duke of Cumberland irritated him so much that George III had an Act passed by parliament to prevent anything similar happening again. What did the Duke of Cumberland do to precipitate this? Hint


Question 11 of 25
11. The sons of George III produced many offspring, but few "legitimate" children. Which son, also known as "Pineapple Head" was the most prolific? Hint


Question 12 of 25
12. The eldest son of George III (not surprisingly also named George) was a constant thorn in his father's side after he turned twenty-one. In what ways did he offend his father while still in his early twenties? Hint


Question 13 of 25
13. George III and his Queen had seven sons that lived to adulthood, but they favoured them differently. The Queen's favourite was George, the Prince of Wales. Which son did George III favour? Hint


Question 14 of 25
14. Of the six daughters of George III, how many eventually got married?

Answer: (A number)
Question 15 of 25
15. When George III had his first bout of "madness" he assaulted Prince George at a family dinner. What did he do to the Prince of Wales? Hint


Question 16 of 25
16. The Prince of Wales basically married for money. Unfortunately he and his "official" wife couldn't stand one another, and spent most of their marriage apart. Who was George's despised wife, who was far more popular than he was? Hint


Question 17 of 25
17. While his mother and five of his sisters were firmly on the Prince of Wales' side in his battles with his wife, one of his sisters strained her relationship with him by her sympathy to her sister-in-law. Which Princess sided with the Princess of Wales? Hint


Question 18 of 25
18. In 1801 there was a rumour going around London that Princess Sophia had secretly given birth to an illegitimate child the previous summer. The other part of the rumour, as to who the father was, resulted in horror and great speculation. According to gossip, who was supposed to be the father of Princess Sophia's baby? Hint


Question 19 of 25
19. In 1806 the Princess of Wales was involved in a formal investigation. Was she declared guilty of misconduct?


Question 20 of 25
20. George, the Prince of Wales had various 'addictions'. He was a compulsive spender, an alcoholic, and had many many affairs with women. He was also an inadvertent drug addict, along with many other people of his time. At various times his family members begged him to stop eating and drinking so much, on the grounds that he wouldn't need to take so much ______, which they were sure wasn't good for him in the amount he took it in. What drug did Prince George take in enormous quantities, often in combination with alcohol? Hint


Question 21 of 25
21. In 1810 George III slipped into permanent "madness," but it was thought at the time that a tragedy within the family precipitated it. What happened to upset the King? Hint


Question 22 of 25
22. George, the Prince of Wales and his wife did manage to have one daughter together, Princess Charlotte. Charlotte grew up to be a boisterous, headstrong teenager, and in 1815 she was engaged to marry Prince William of Orange. She shocked and enraged her father by suddenly breaking the engagement. Why did she do this? Hint


Question 23 of 25
23. In 1815 Prince Ernest, Duke of Cumberland deeply offended his mother the Queen by getting engaged to his cousin Frederica of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Why was the Queen so upset?
Hint


Question 24 of 25
24. After the tragic death of Charlotte, Princess of Wales there was a veritable race amoung the surviving sons of George III to sire a legitimate heir to the throne. Which brother won this "race"? Hint


Question 25 of 25
25. William IV, the the last Hanoverian King of Britain had a very difficult relationship with one of his sisters-in-law. Which one? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. George I became King of England on the death of his distant cousin. There was once a suggestion that this couple marry, but Princess _____ could not stand George and refused to consider the matter. The scheme was abandoned and they both married other people. Who was destined to refuse to marry George, and yet was succeeded by him?

Answer: Queen Anne

Anne was to have been succeeded by Sophia, George's mother, but she died just a few weeks before Anne, making George King of Hanover, and later of England as well.
2. George I married his first cousin, the daughter of his father's brother. They came to hate one another, and George was particuarly vicious in the way she was treated. Who was this unfortunate woman?

Answer: Sophia of Celle

The court at Hanover was hostile to Sophia from the very beginning, and her mother-in-law disliked her intensely. Eventually George came to despise his wife as well, and people went out of their way to slight her. Probably bored and very lonely, Sophia developed a friendship with the Swedish Count Phillip Christoph von Königsmarck. At the time many people insisted that she and von Königsmarck were lovers, but this is not certain.

Unfortunately George chose to believe the rumours, and so had Königsmarck killed. George then had his marriage dissolved on the grounds that Sophia had abandoned her husband, and with the help of her father, had her locked up in the castle of Ahlden. Although Sophia was allowed to move about the castle grounds (under supervision), and given sufficient servants and income, she was never allowed to see her children or her father again. She lived a further 32 years.
3. George I divorced his wife and never re-married, although he did keep mistresses. One of these was an enormously fat woman whom George created Countess of Darlington, and whom rumour made out to be a close relative of his. How was she supposedly related to King George I?

Answer: She was his half-sister

She was believed to be the result of an affair George's father had as a young man with a courtesan at the court in Hanover.
4. George I and his son the future George II despised one another, but George II was very lucky in his marriage partner. Who was she?

Answer: Caroline of Ansbach

Caroline was a very interesting character. Much smarter than her husband, many people of the time said that she was the actual ruler. She was particuarly interested in science, and corresponded very intelligently with some of the greatest minds of her day.

Caroline and George had a very loving, if unusual relationship - Caroline actually encouraged her husband to take mistresses, and even picked out suitable women for him. When apart, George would write Caroline long letters about his latest conquests, and she often made suggestions to help him in his seductions.

Not the best of parents, they did have nine children together but shared an implacable hatred for their eldest son, Prince Frederick. As she lay dying, Caroline expressed relief that she at least would not have to look at Frederick ever again.
5. Carrying on the family tradition of dislike for the eldest son, George II and his Queen could not bear the Prince of Wales. Who was referred to as "poor ______" by the people of England?

Answer: Fred

Just why his parents disliked him so is uncertain, but the feeling seems to have been mutual. Prince Frederick made a point of opposing his parents on everything, but especially politically.
6. George II and his Queen much preferred their second son, the Duke of Cumberland. The Duke was destined to have a flower named after him in both Scotland and England. What was the popular Scottish name for the flower?

Answer: Stinking Billy

Unlike their elder son Frederick, William had been born in England and grew up with his parents. Frederick on the other hand had been left in Hanover by his parents when they went to England with George I. When Frederick finally joined them in England he was 20 years old, and they hadn't seen him since he was 7. They simply did not know one another, and his parents were disappointed with what they saw. Frederick was to suffer greatly in the comparison with his younger brother.

As for the flower, the English name for it is Sweet William. I made up the Purple Pansy and The Cumberland Rose.

The Scots hated the Duke of Cumberland for the part he played in supressing the Jacobite Rising of 1745-1746, nicknaming him "The Butcher of Cumberland".

The English renamed the dianthus barbatus flower in Prince William's honour, in gratitude for having saved them from Bonnie Prince Charlie. Some Scots however still refer to the same aromatic flower as the "Stinking Billy."
7. In August of 1737 the Prince of Wales had a spat with George II and his Queen, and insisted that his wife (who was in labour at the time) be moved from Hampton Court to St. James' Palace because he did not want his Mom and Dad to attend the birth of his eldest child. Who was his wife?

Answer: Augusta of Saxe-Gotha

Augusta and Frederick were married when she was sixteen and he was twenty-eight, and they had nine children together. Reasonably happy in her marriage, Augusta went along with her husband in his feud against his parents. Basically banished from court, the family lived mostly at their country estates.

After Frederick's early death Augusta's political importance increased, but she deliberately kept her children away from her father-in-law because she did not trust him. On George II's death in 1760 Augusta was asked to serve as regent for her son, George III. However, she was never popular and when she died at the age of 52 her funeral procession attracted people who threw garbage and shouted insults.
8. When the Prince of Wales died in 1751 George II wrote in his diary "I have lost my oldest son, but I was glad of it." What did the Prince die of?

Answer: He caught a chill after sustaining a head injury and most likely died of pneumonia

Prince Frederick was hit on the head by a cricket ball, which caused great concern at the time. He made light of his concussion, continuing with his usual activities and subsequently caught a chill which led to his death a few weeks later at the age of 44.

His eldest son, the future George III was created Prince of Wales shortly after Prince Frederick's death.
9. When George III became King in 1760 he was the most eligible bachelor in Europe. A massive search for a suitable bride was made for him. Whom did he end up making his Queen?

Answer: Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Charlotte is said to have been extremely ugly, and some accounts claim that George III visibly winced when he first met her on their wedding day. The wedding however took place, and for many years they were very happy together. Although there are persistent, but unsubstantiated rumours that George III had a previous marriage with Hannah Lightfoot, he is unusual among the Hanoverian kings in that he never took a mistress after his marriage to Charlotte.

The couple produced fifteen children, of whom two died in early childhood.
10. George III was not his parents' favourite child, and he did not have an easy relationship with any of his siblings. In his early years as King, all three of his brothers caused him much embarrassment with their extravagant living and flagrant affairs, but in 1771 the actions of Henry, Duke of Cumberland irritated him so much that George III had an Act passed by parliament to prevent anything similar happening again. What did the Duke of Cumberland do to precipitate this?

Answer: He secretly married a commoner

Henry, Duke of Cumberland had married his mistress Lady Anne Horton and informed his brother of it after the fact by asking for a larger allowance given his new status as a married man. George was infuriated that he had not been consulted about the marriage. Worse than this for George III was the fact that Lady Anne was an Irish commoner, and her sister (and constant companion) was notorious throughout Europe for her gambling. He thought it was shameful that a brother of the King would so lower himself in marriage, and took steps to see that such a thing could not happen again.

The Royal Marriages Act made it illegal for any member of the British royal family under the age of 25 to marry without the consent of the ruling monarch. Those over the age of 25 who were refused permission of the monarch to marry could marry one year after giving notice to the Privy Council of their intentions, unless another Act was passed preventing the marriage in the meantime.

Shortly after the Act was passed in parliament, George III's youngest brother William, Duke of Gloucester admitted that he too had secretly married his mistress five years before, and she was now pregnant with their first child. The King reacted badly to this news, banishing the Gloucesters from court and insisting that the Privy Council investigate the marriage to determine its legitimacy. It was eventually found to be valid, and George grudgingly admitted that they were in fact legally married, but stubbornly refused to see either the Cumberlands or the Gloucesters at court. Later he relented and saw his brothers, but refused to receive either of their wives.

With his sisters married abroad and his brothers both in disgrace, George III was isolated from his family. He pinned his hopes on his children instead, little suspecting how much trouble they would cause him in the future.
11. The sons of George III produced many offspring, but few "legitimate" children. Which son, also known as "Pineapple Head" was the most prolific?

Answer: William

The future William IV was the third son of George III, and not expected to ascend the throne, so his education was somewhat neglected and he was packed off to the Navy at thirteen.

After leaving the Royal Navy he spent most of his time pressuring his father to make him a Duke, defending his brother George's expensive lifestyle and speaking in favour of slavery in parliament. He otherwise occupied his time with a series of mistresses (fathering several children along the way), eventually settling down with the actress Dorothea Jordan, by whom he had ten children who came to be known as the Fitz-Clarences.

William got the nickname of Pineapple Head during his stint in the navy, and it apparently stuck. If you look at his portraits you will see that his head is of an unusual shape. He was also known as the Sailor King, which he was said to approve of as a nickname.
12. The eldest son of George III (not surprisingly also named George) was a constant thorn in his father's side after he turned twenty-one. In what ways did he offend his father while still in his early twenties?

Answer: All of these

The Prince of Wales had an annual income of over £50,000 and yet was constantly in debt. His father, who had always been quite frugal, disapproved of his extravagance. Then much to George III's annoyance the Prince openly supported the Whig party knowing full well that his father favoured the Tories.

The final straw came when George met and went through a form of marriage with a Catholic widow, Maria Fitzherbert. There were two main reasons why this marriage could not stand, and the prince was well aware of them. These were the Act of Settlement which stipulated that those who married a Roman Catholic were ineligible to inherit the throne, and the Royal Marriages Act which stated he could not marry without the consent of the King. George did not consult his father when he impulsively married Mrs. Fitzherbert.

Legally, the marriage was a real one, but publicly very little was said about it and they quietly lived together for many years (even after the Prince's "official" marriage). The royal family chose to ignore this fact. George and Maria eventually tired of one another and the couple separated.

Mrs. Fitzherbert was given a very generous allowance and obligingly did not press her rights as wife to the heir to the throne.
13. George III and his Queen had seven sons that lived to adulthood, but they favoured them differently. The Queen's favourite was George, the Prince of Wales. Which son did George III favour?

Answer: Frederick, Duke of York

He thought that Frederick had a better character than his oldest son George.

Frederick was in some ways more responsible than his older brother, but the fact was that their father did not trust the young George with any responsibility, believing him to be a drunken wastrel. The younger George therefore spent most of his time designing buildings, spending money, drinking and chasing women, thus making his father's prophecy come true.
14. Of the six daughters of George III, how many eventually got married?

Answer: Three

None of the Princesses married when they were young, largely because of their parents' reluctance to let go of any of them.

Queen Charlotte in particular seemed to view her daughters as a committee whose job it was to keep her company, especially as she got older. In addition, George III's sisters' bad experiences in their marriages outside Britain made him extremely loathe to let any of his daughters marry out of the country.

As a result, all three of the King's daughters were quite old (by the standards of their day) when they finally did marry. Charlotte, the Princess Royal, was married to the widowed Duke of Wuerttemburg at the age of 30. Her younger sisters Elizabeth and Mary however were not able to marry until the Regency period, at the ages of 48 and 40 respectively. They both did so with the help of their brother George, who overruled their mother's objections in the interest of his sisters' happiness.
15. When George III had his first bout of "madness" he assaulted Prince George at a family dinner. What did he do to the Prince of Wales?

Answer: He grabbed him out of his chair and threw him up against a nearby wall

Prince George and his brother Frederick, concerned about reports of their father not being well, had come down to Windsor to visit and see him for themselves. During the dinner, the conversation had come round to the topic of murder when the King suddenly jumped out of his chair and attacked the Prince.

Not surprisingly this upset everyone present, and Queen Charlotte went into hysterics. The King spent much of his time during this illness complaining about the Queen, expounding on how much he disliked and resented her. Queen Charlotte was deeply hurt by this, and the strain made her hair turn completely white in less than a year. Unfortunately her personality changed as well, and she took out her frustrations and bitterness on her hapless daughters.

The relationship between the King and Queen was never the same again, even when the King temporarily recovered.
16. The Prince of Wales basically married for money. Unfortunately he and his "official" wife couldn't stand one another, and spent most of their marriage apart. Who was George's despised wife, who was far more popular than he was?

Answer: Caroline of Brunswick

The agreement was that his massive debts (said to be over £630,000)would be cleared if he married Caroline, a choice approved of by his father.

When the Prince first met his intended bride he immediately called for a large brandy. He continued swilling brandy for three days, and was dead drunk on his wedding night.

Caroline was said to be short, fat, extremely unhygienic, promiscuous and ugly, and she didn't like George any more than he liked her. The wedding took place in 1795, and the following year Caroline gave birth to a baby girl whom they named Charlotte Augusta. The couple separated soon after this.

Caroline was a warm-hearted woman, known for taking in orphans and helping anyone who was in trouble. However, she lacked common sense, decorum and discretion, and was loud and flamboyant. The public of course loved her, and took her side in her battles with the Prince of Wales.

George, for his part, did his best to avoid his wife and to keep their daughter away from her influence by providing a household separate from both of them. To his credit, he was probably right to do so, even though he wasn't exactly a paragon of virtue himself. Caroline was rumoured to indulge in very inappropriate behaviour at her house, and did not seem to care what conclusions might be drawn, contending that it was none of anyone's business what she did in her own time.

Later in life she toured Europe, where she several times exposed herself in public, danced half-naked in Italy, and (it was said) took Napoleon's brother-in-law as a lover. She also told anyone who would listen about the Prince of Wales' boorish behaviour toward her.
17. While his mother and five of his sisters were firmly on the Prince of Wales' side in his battles with his wife, one of his sisters strained her relationship with him by her sympathy to her sister-in-law. Which Princess sided with the Princess of Wales?

Answer: Sophia

The Prince of Wales was flabbergasted that anyone other than his father would take the side of his horrible wife, but Sophia was always the rebel of the family. She also wrote eloquently about her anger at her increasingly difficult mother, and her desire to lead a life separate from the Royal family.

Her relationship with her brother George remained strained until his death.
18. In 1801 there was a rumour going around London that Princess Sophia had secretly given birth to an illegitimate child the previous summer. The other part of the rumour, as to who the father was, resulted in horror and great speculation. According to gossip, who was supposed to be the father of Princess Sophia's baby?

Answer: Her brother Ernest, Duke of Cumberland

Most historians agree that Sophia probably did give birth to a child in August 1800. However, while it is theoretically possible that her brother Ernest was the father, most experts think it more likely to have been General Thomas Garth. General Garth did later adopt the infant believed to be his, and had a very close friendship with the Princess.

Prince Ernest on the other hand had a very sinister reputation, and had more than once been accused of rape during his stint in the army. Certainly his brother George did not like or trust him, and in several letters to his sisters the Prince of Wales warned them not to spend any time alone with Ernest.

The Duke of Cumberland was later suspected of murdering his valet. The mysterious death was ruled a suicide, but many people of the time were convinced there had been a cover-up.
19. In 1806 the Princess of Wales was involved in a formal investigation. Was she declared guilty of misconduct?

Answer: No

An accusation that she had borne an illegitimate child resulted in a Royal Commission entitled the "Delicate Investigation". She was found innocent, but "imprudent." In other words, they couldn't prove the child in question was hers.
20. George, the Prince of Wales had various 'addictions'. He was a compulsive spender, an alcoholic, and had many many affairs with women. He was also an inadvertent drug addict, along with many other people of his time. At various times his family members begged him to stop eating and drinking so much, on the grounds that he wouldn't need to take so much ______, which they were sure wasn't good for him in the amount he took it in. What drug did Prince George take in enormous quantities, often in combination with alcohol?

Answer: Laudanum

Laudanum was an opium-based painkiller in tincture form, frequently prescribed by doctors in the late 1700s and well into the middle of the 19th century. People of all classes took it as a painkiller, for headaches, tuberculosis and even for constipation. The future George IV had great faith in its ability to cure almost anything, and took up to 200 drops of it at a time (a potentially fatal amount).

Due to his lifestyle, George frequently felt ill. If his doctors advised against his "cure", he commonly took charge himself, casually opening a vein in his arm and dosing himself with laudanum.

His friends and family were often very concerned about his lifestyle, and tried to get George to take better care of himself, but their pleas fell on deaf ears. His self-destructive habits continued throughout life, and at one time he weighed nearly 300 pounds. The fact that he lived to the age of 67 is testimony to his strong physical constitution - most people would have died long before.
21. In 1810 George III slipped into permanent "madness," but it was thought at the time that a tragedy within the family precipitated it. What happened to upset the King?

Answer: His youngest daughter Amelia died after a long illness

Amelia was the favourite daughter of the King. She had always been rather sickly, and developed pulmonary tuberculosis in her mid-twenties. The "treatments" her doctors gave her more nothing short of torture, and although they tried very hard to save her, she died at the age of 27.

The King, who had been certain that his daughter could be cured, never got over the shock. His "madness" returned, and he was isolated in Windsor Castle for the rest of his life.
22. George, the Prince of Wales and his wife did manage to have one daughter together, Princess Charlotte. Charlotte grew up to be a boisterous, headstrong teenager, and in 1815 she was engaged to marry Prince William of Orange. She shocked and enraged her father by suddenly breaking the engagement. Why did she do this?

Answer: She realized that William expected her to live with him outside of England

Charlotte was well aware of the problems between her parents, and that her father was desperate to divorce her mother. She also knew that the only thing stopping him now that he was Regent was the popular support she and her mother had.

Her reasoning was that if she were to leave the country, support for her and her mother would gradually die and it would be easier for her father to obtain a divorce. If this happened, the Prince Regent could marry again and have more children, and if he had sons, Charlotte would suddenly become a nobody. In short, William of Orange's determination to live at The Hague after marriage destroyed his engagement to Princess Charlotte because she felt that her place in the succession was threatened.

While she fully intended to marry and thus gain some measure of independence, Charlotte was more determined to stay in England and protect her own interests.

When she believed her father might force her into the marriage with William of Orange, she ran away to her mother's house. Princess Caroline however was quietly preparing to leave England and did not want to get involved. Charlotte was then sent to visit the Queen and her aunts, who were supposed to promote the marriage. They were not successful, and the project was dropped.

Princess Charlotte eventually married Leopold of Saxe-Cobourg, and they were very happy together, living in England. She died in childbirth at the age of 21.
23. In 1815 Prince Ernest, Duke of Cumberland deeply offended his mother the Queen by getting engaged to his cousin Frederica of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Why was the Queen so upset?

Answer: All of these

The couple did get the permission of the Prince Regent, and were in fact married at his house in London, which further upset Queen Charlotte. She refused to see her immoral daughter-in-law, and tried to prevent her daughters from seeing her as well.
24. After the tragic death of Charlotte, Princess of Wales there was a veritable race amoung the surviving sons of George III to sire a legitimate heir to the throne. Which brother won this "race"?

Answer: Edward, Duke of Kent

Edward was the fourth son of George III, and had never expected to be in line for the throne. But with Princess Charlotte dead and all of his older brothers without legitimate children, the chances of his offspring becoming monarch became a very real possibility. He therefore married Victoria of Saxe-Coburg and the couple quickly produced a daughter - the future Queen Victoria.

George, Prince of Wales deeply resented what he viewed as their smugness in their achievement, but could do little about it. Prince Edward died less than a year after his daughter's birth.
25. William IV, the the last Hanoverian King of Britain had a very difficult relationship with one of his sisters-in-law. Which one?

Answer: Victoria of Saxe-Coburg, mother of the future Queen, Victoria

Victoria of Saxe-Coburg was by most accounts a very difficult and domineering woman, and she saw William as an ignorant boor. Fearing his influence, she did her best to keep her daughter, Victoria, away from her uncle, the King.

William was under no illusions about how he was viewed by his sister-in-law and publicly criticised her for stopping the heir-apparent from learning the business of the monarchy.

Thank you for taking my quiz on the Hanoverians! Please remember to rate it before you go.
Source: Author pele

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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