Quiz about Phlebotomists  We Want Your Blood
Quiz about Phlebotomists  We Want Your Blood

Phlebotomists: We Want Your Blood! Quiz


If you've ever had blood drawn for lab tests, you've probably had some contact with a phlebotomist. This quiz will give you some interesting information to think about the next time you see a needle approaching!

A multiple-choice quiz by duchessjlh. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
duchessjlh
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
251,341
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
5724
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 98 (10/10), Guest 172 (10/10), Guest 204 (9/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Before we begin with a patient, let's settle a definition. Phlebotomists mainly draw blood through venipuncture. Venipuncture means puncturing a vein with what object? Hint

A hollow needle
A lancet
A solid needle
A syringe

2. A patient comes in, and I seat her in a nice comfortable chair. As a phlebotomist, what is the very first thing I must do? Hint

Verify her identity
Apply a tourniquet
Choose the proper needle
Feel for a vein

3. I look at the tests ordered for my patient. I see that she needs multiple containers of blood drawn. Do I need to fill these containers in any particular order? Hint

Yes
No
It depends on the shape of the containers
It depends on the number of containers

4. I know who my patient is, and I know which containers I am going to draw. Next, I'm going to look for my vein of choice: the median cubital vein. Where am I going to look? Hint

The front of the elbow, toward the outside edge
The front of the elbow, right in the center
The back of the hand
The foot

5. I apply a tourniquet to my patient's upper arm and begin to feel for a vein with my finger. What am I feeling for? Hint

A pulse
A bounce, like an elastic tube
A hollow or a depression
A hard structure, like a ridge

6. To prevent infection, I need to clean and disinfect the skin before inserting the needle. Which of the following chemicals is the *least* likely disinfectant to be used for routine venipuncture? Hint

Iodine
Sodium hypochlorite
Chlorhexidine
Isopropyl alcohol

7. I am ready to start, so I slip my needle into the vein and fill the tubes. As I pull the needle back out, I place a piece of gauze over the wound and press down. What am I preventing during this step? Hint

Bruising
Fainting
Clotting
All of the above

8. After taking blood from my patient she suddenly begins to look pale and complains of dizziness. Her eyes are beginning to roll back into her head. What do I do? Hint

Gently slap her
Apply a warm compress
Lean her back in the chair
Apply a cold compress

9. My patient recovers from her faint and heads out the door. She is very unlikely to contract an infection from the procedure because I have followed the principles of infection control. Which of the following is NOT an infection control procedure? Hint

Handwashing
Checking ID
Using a new needle
Using an appropriate disinfectant

10. As a phlebotomist, I follow standard precautions to protect myself from infection. Which of the following will I NEVER do? Hint

Wear gloves while drawing blood
Dispose of used needles in a sharps container
Wash my hands before and after wearing gloves
Recap used needles


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Before we begin with a patient, let's settle a definition. Phlebotomists mainly draw blood through venipuncture. Venipuncture means puncturing a vein with what object?

Answer: A hollow needle

Hollow needles allow the blood to flow into a collection container. Lancets are used when only a drop of blood is required, such as when testing blood sugar. Syringes may or may not have a hollow needle attached. Syringes with hollow needles are occasionally used in phlebotomy. A solid needle would just block up the puncture.
2. A patient comes in, and I seat her in a nice comfortable chair. As a phlebotomist, what is the very first thing I must do?

Answer: Verify her identity

This is extremely important! When you have blood drawn, the phlebotomist should make sure you are the person listed on the lab label. This may include asking you for your last name and checking your date of birth. It isn't going to do you any good if your blood is labeled with another person's name, and it could do you a lot of harm.
3. I look at the tests ordered for my patient. I see that she needs multiple containers of blood drawn. Do I need to fill these containers in any particular order?

Answer: Yes

Some blood containers have chemicals already added to them. If I draw these containers in the wrong order, I can contaminate one container with the chemical from another. Sometimes, these contaminate chemicals can then throw off lab results.
4. I know who my patient is, and I know which containers I am going to draw. Next, I'm going to look for my vein of choice: the median cubital vein. Where am I going to look?

Answer: The front of the elbow, right in the center

The median cubital vein runs past the center of the elbow, in an area known as the antecubital region. The cephalic and basilic vein run to either side of the median cubital vein, but there are nerves near both veins. I don't want to hurt my patient, so I will avoid these if I can.

In cases where the antecubital region is damaged, or the veins cannot be found, I may use the back of the hand. The foot is rarely used, only as a last resort.
5. I apply a tourniquet to my patient's upper arm and begin to feel for a vein with my finger. What am I feeling for?

Answer: A bounce, like an elastic tube

A pulse would indicate an artery and I definitely don't want to hit that! Hard structures and hollows in the arm are muscles and ligaments. A vein should bounce like an inflated elastic tube. When I feel for a vein I am actually feeling for the location of the vein, the direction of the vein, and the depth of the vein.
6. To prevent infection, I need to clean and disinfect the skin before inserting the needle. Which of the following chemicals is the *least* likely disinfectant to be used for routine venipuncture?

Answer: Sodium hypochlorite

All of these compounds are disinfectants. In the UK isopropanol is the one most commonly used during venipuncture. It sanitizes the surface of the skin and then quickly evaporates. For best results, the alcohol should be wiped in a circular motion to push bacteria away from the puncture site. Chlorhexidine is the skin cleanser that is sometimes known as Hibiscrub and is also used in some mouthwashes.
Sodium hypochlorite is household bleach. Iodine based cleaners are used in more critical applications, such as surgery, but may cause allergic reactions in some people.
7. I am ready to start, so I slip my needle into the vein and fill the tubes. As I pull the needle back out, I place a piece of gauze over the wound and press down. What am I preventing during this step?

Answer: Bruising

Pressure promotes clotting, both at the surface of the skin and in the vein itself. A hematoma, otherwise known as a bruise, will result if the vein reopens and leaks blood under the skin. This is both unattractive and unpleasant for the patient.
8. After taking blood from my patient she suddenly begins to look pale and complains of dizziness. Her eyes are beginning to roll back into her head. What do I do?

Answer: Lean her back in the chair

My patient is fainting. This is a relatively uncommon event, but it is best to be prepared. The major danger is that the patient will fall on the floor, so I will help her to recline. Most chairs used in phlebotomy labs either recline a bit backward or have a bar that goes across a patient's lap.

A few minutes of peace and quiet, reclining comfortably, is all most patients need to recover from a faint. Slapping is definitely not recommended! Although my patient here is female, in my experience, young men are more likely to faint.
9. My patient recovers from her faint and heads out the door. She is very unlikely to contract an infection from the procedure because I have followed the principles of infection control. Which of the following is NOT an infection control procedure?

Answer: Checking ID

Checking the patient's ID is important, but it does not protect the patient from infection during venipuncture.
10. As a phlebotomist, I follow standard precautions to protect myself from infection. Which of the following will I NEVER do?

Answer: Recap used needles

Most needles made these days have a safety feature that is activated after the needle is used. These features cover the sharp point of the needle, helping to reduce accidental sticks. Recapping used needles is very dangerous and never encouraged.
Source: Author duchessjlh

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