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Quiz about Disco Dating with Disco Data Basic MS Access
Quiz about Disco Dating with Disco Data Basic MS Access

Disco Dating with Disco Data: Basic MS Access Quiz


Follow along with romantic matchmaker Disco Stu as he uses Microsoft Access' database capabilities to find a date for disco novice Ned Flanders.

A multiple-choice quiz by stuthehistoryguy. Estimated time: 7 mins.
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Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
241,011
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
418
Question 1 of 10
1. During his many years in the disco scene, Disco Stu has compiled a large database of lovely ladies who have captured Disco Stu's attention while Disco Stu does his thing. This quiz will walk the quiztaker through some of the Microsoft Access features Disco Stu uses to set up Disco Stu's friends - in this case a disco novice named Ned Flanders - with prospective dates. (For those of you unfamiliar with the "Simpsons" character Disco Stu: Disco Stu always refers to himself in the third person, and Disco Stu rarely uses pronouns. Also, for those of you put off by the phrase "lovely ladies", rest assured that Disco Stu considers all ladies lovely. Finally, for those of you not familiar with Ned Flanders, just picture Ward Cleaver without the charisma.)

The most important part of Disco Stu's Date Database is a table, which we will call Tbl-Ladies. This table contains the basic information about each of these prospective companions for Flanders. Each lady is represented by one record in the database, and individual pieces of information about each of these lovely ladies is stored in a field. Every lady in this table will be represented by the same fields; if Disco Stu does not have all the information for a lady, then that field will be blank. There are a number of different data types in Access, including Text, Number, and Date/Time. Which of these would least likely be a text field in Tbl-Ladies?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Disco Stu's Date Database is all about relationships. However, before Disco Stu can create relationships between groovy people, Disco Stu will have to create relationships between groovy tables. For example, since people need variety, Disco Stu's Date Database will also have tables for all the Discos in Springfield, like Tbl-Stu's Disco and Tbl-Moe's Disco. To relate tables, Disco Stu must sort each table by the same field, known as the primary key. This field must be unique for every record. Which of these fields in Tbl-Ladies would make the best primary key? (Remember: it should be UNIQUE.) Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Now Disco Stu has sorted TBL-Ladies in Disco Stu's Date Database. This was a very important step in the process; once the order of a table has been established, it can only be changed by rebuilding the whole thing from scratch.


Question 4 of 10
4. Disco Stu has ordered the tables in Disco Stu's Date Database, but there are still a few ladies whose information should be entered into the database's tables before Disco Stu tries to line up a date for Flanders. To do this, Disco Stu will use a groovy form that, like his groovy tables, is also part of Disco Stu's Date Database. Which of these is not true of forms in Microsoft Access (as they relate to Disco Stu)? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Queries are powerful tools for working with databases, and Microsoft Access features several different types of these beauties. If Disco Stu wants the names and cell numbers of all the ladies in Disco Stu's Date Database who have been to both Stu's Disco and Moe's Disco in the last month (these ladies really like to disco!), what kind of query should Disco Stu use? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. While browsing TBL-Ladies, Disco Stu notices that, in his disco dabblings, he has collected some of these ladies' information several times. In fact, Disco Stu has typed in the data for one Mindy Simmons on 27 occasions. What kind of query can Disco Stu use to get himself out of this jam? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. What the Disco Inferno? It seems that Springfield's intrepid Mayor Quimby, in a fit of local boosterism, has renamed a stretch of Gum Tree Street after a local celebrity. This means that a row of townhouses known to be inhabited by a horde of lovely ladies who choose to reside closest to Springfield's Disco District will now be located on Troy McClure Way. This calls for a big change in Disco Stu's Date Database. What is the most appropriate Microsoft Access tool for this mass transformation? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. So now Disco Stu is working on a report for Flanders based on his query of the tables in his database; after that, Disco Stu can only hope. Since Disco Stu is so cool, he wants this report to look gooooood. What feature does Access NOT offer that can help Disco Stu with his report? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Disco Stu has been very mindful of database conventions in creating his Date Database; these conventions include using at least two fields for each lovely lady's name (FirstName and LastName) and using numeric dates. These allow for easy sorting of the database, but can be difficult to read if Disco Stu prints them on a report in these formats. Not to worry - MS Access has several features that can render Disco Stu's efficient data into groovy reading. Which of these is not a feature that Disco Stu can use to sweeten how others see his data, regardless of how Disco Stu was doing his input thing? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Finally, Disco Stu is ready to present his results to Flanders. Something of an Access guru himself, Flanders asks to see Disco Stu's database, and the erstwhile matchmaker complies: "Disco Stu has nothing to hide."

"Boy, that's a gosh-diddly great setup you have there, Disco Stu," says Flanders. "Can I tweak it for you just a guldarn bit?" After sorting out the possible unsavory aspects of Flanders' "tweaking", Disco Stu acquiesces. Flanders sits down and opens the SQL Server window on Disco Stu's computer. Three hours later, with Flanders still at it, Disco Stu resigns himself to the fact that Flanders is not Lovely Disco Lady material: "I knew I should have disco ducked this assignment." What does SQL stand for?
Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. During his many years in the disco scene, Disco Stu has compiled a large database of lovely ladies who have captured Disco Stu's attention while Disco Stu does his thing. This quiz will walk the quiztaker through some of the Microsoft Access features Disco Stu uses to set up Disco Stu's friends - in this case a disco novice named Ned Flanders - with prospective dates. (For those of you unfamiliar with the "Simpsons" character Disco Stu: Disco Stu always refers to himself in the third person, and Disco Stu rarely uses pronouns. Also, for those of you put off by the phrase "lovely ladies", rest assured that Disco Stu considers all ladies lovely. Finally, for those of you not familiar with Ned Flanders, just picture Ward Cleaver without the charisma.) The most important part of Disco Stu's Date Database is a table, which we will call Tbl-Ladies. This table contains the basic information about each of these prospective companions for Flanders. Each lady is represented by one record in the database, and individual pieces of information about each of these lovely ladies is stored in a field. Every lady in this table will be represented by the same fields; if Disco Stu does not have all the information for a lady, then that field will be blank. There are a number of different data types in Access, including Text, Number, and Date/Time. Which of these would least likely be a text field in Tbl-Ladies?

Answer: Each lady's complete hopes, dreams, and aspirations

Something as long as a person's hopes, dreams and aspirations would be too long for a text field, which is limited to 255 characters. If they appeared in a database at all, they would probably be in a memo field or, better yet, a hyperlink to a text file stored elsewhere.

Although a database usually isn't the place for something so elaborate as a lady's hopes, dreams, and aspirations, you can do whatever you want with your own Access databases; Disco Stu wants you to be comfortable while he does his thing.
2. Disco Stu's Date Database is all about relationships. However, before Disco Stu can create relationships between groovy people, Disco Stu will have to create relationships between groovy tables. For example, since people need variety, Disco Stu's Date Database will also have tables for all the Discos in Springfield, like Tbl-Stu's Disco and Tbl-Moe's Disco. To relate tables, Disco Stu must sort each table by the same field, known as the primary key. This field must be unique for every record. Which of these fields in Tbl-Ladies would make the best primary key? (Remember: it should be UNIQUE.)

Answer: Each lady's cell phone number

Since several ladies will probably have the same first name, favorite disco, and favorite color, Disco Stu would not consider these unique. On the other hand, Disco Stu doesn't know any ladies who share a cell phone number, though there may be some out there with a shared plan that might cause Disco Stu some problems. To avoid such embarrassing mix-ups, Disco Stu should assign each record a unique ID field using Microsoft Access' auto number feature.

Then again, Disco Stu knows from experience that unpredictability is the spice to that gourmet meal we call love (even if it is sloppy database management and should be avoided by anyone not named Disco Stu).
3. Now Disco Stu has sorted TBL-Ladies in Disco Stu's Date Database. This was a very important step in the process; once the order of a table has been established, it can only be changed by rebuilding the whole thing from scratch.

Answer: False

Sorting a database is very easy and can be done in both design view and datasheet view. This is important, since Disco Stu might want to use a field like [CelPhone] to relate this table to others in his database, but might want to sort on a field like [ZipCode] for other purposes, like getting a quick glance at which ladies live close to Flanders.
4. Disco Stu has ordered the tables in Disco Stu's Date Database, but there are still a few ladies whose information should be entered into the database's tables before Disco Stu tries to line up a date for Flanders. To do this, Disco Stu will use a groovy form that, like his groovy tables, is also part of Disco Stu's Date Database. Which of these is not true of forms in Microsoft Access (as they relate to Disco Stu)?

Answer: Once a form has been used to enter data, it's design cannot be altered. As in most of Disco Stu's romantic relationships, Disco Stu would need to start over from the beginning

Disco Stu can modify his form however many times Disco Stu wants. To add and delete fields, labels, and other design elements to and from a form, Disco Stu can use the form design view. Fields can be deleted from the form, or added from the floating field list which Disco Stu can call up from the view menu. Modifying a form in Microsoft Access is easy as pie - and twice as sweet.
5. Queries are powerful tools for working with databases, and Microsoft Access features several different types of these beauties. If Disco Stu wants the names and cell numbers of all the ladies in Disco Stu's Date Database who have been to both Stu's Disco and Moe's Disco in the last month (these ladies really like to disco!), what kind of query should Disco Stu use?

Answer: A select query

In this case, Disco Stu would relate the following tables:

*Tbl-Ladies (containing all the basic data for the lovely ladies, including fields [FirstName], [LastName], and [CelPhone]);
*Tbl-Stu's Disco (containing fields [CelPhone] and [DateVisited]), and;
*Tbl-Moe's Disco (also containing fields [CelPhone] and [DateVisited]).

Then Disco Stu would select:

*[First Name], [Last Name], and [Cel Phone] from Tbl-Ladies;
*[Date Visited] from Tbl-Stu's Disco, and;
*[Date Visited] from Tbl-Moe's Disco.

Next, Disco Stu would set selection criteria for both [Date Visited] fields, selecting for records later than one month ago; the formula would look like ">9/30/06" (without the quotes) if Disco Stu were running this query on 10/31/06. Furthermore, Disco Stu could also toggle off the show checkbox for both date fields if Disco Stu did not want to overload his fragile brain. Finally, Disco Stu would see the query's results by clicking the view button on the toolbar. This would give Disco Stu his list of lovely ladies who like to disco.
6. While browsing TBL-Ladies, Disco Stu notices that, in his disco dabblings, he has collected some of these ladies' information several times. In fact, Disco Stu has typed in the data for one Mindy Simmons on 27 occasions. What kind of query can Disco Stu use to get himself out of this jam?

Answer: A find duplicates query

Sorry if that seemed like a trick question; Disco Stu is not programmed to deceive. A find duplicates query (which you can find on the query wizards menu) allows Disco Stu to find records where a certain field is exactly the same between one or more entries.

This query lets Disco Stu delete duplicates, but always asks to make sure this is OK. Hey, there could always be more than one lovely lady out there with a name like Mindy Simmons.
7. What the Disco Inferno? It seems that Springfield's intrepid Mayor Quimby, in a fit of local boosterism, has renamed a stretch of Gum Tree Street after a local celebrity. This means that a row of townhouses known to be inhabited by a horde of lovely ladies who choose to reside closest to Springfield's Disco District will now be located on Troy McClure Way. This calls for a big change in Disco Stu's Date Database. What is the most appropriate Microsoft Access tool for this mass transformation?

Answer: An update query

Like the find duplicates query, update queries are "action queries" - queries that change the data in the original table or make new tables rather than just showing information. Other action queries include make table, union, and delete queries. It is very common for well-developed database to have many saved queries that are used or viewed periodically.
8. So now Disco Stu is working on a report for Flanders based on his query of the tables in his database; after that, Disco Stu can only hope. Since Disco Stu is so cool, he wants this report to look gooooood. What feature does Access NOT offer that can help Disco Stu with his report?

Answer: Field labels that must be displayed next to each field on the report

Although Access does drop in field labels automatically when designing a report, these labels can be changed or deleted altogether. Likewise, this report will most likely be based on a select query using whatever criteria Disco Stu chooses. Like Disco Stu, Microsoft Access is all about letting you do your thing.
9. Disco Stu has been very mindful of database conventions in creating his Date Database; these conventions include using at least two fields for each lovely lady's name (FirstName and LastName) and using numeric dates. These allow for easy sorting of the database, but can be difficult to read if Disco Stu prints them on a report in these formats. Not to worry - MS Access has several features that can render Disco Stu's efficient data into groovy reading. Which of these is not a feature that Disco Stu can use to sweeten how others see his data, regardless of how Disco Stu was doing his input thing?

Answer: Input Masks

Concatenation is a feature that joins fields (or portions of fields) for display or update purposes, so Disco Stu can give Flanders a list of names that look like "Lois Green" instead of "Lois [lots of spaces] Green ". Date/Time Formats allow date and time to be displayed however Disco Stu wants. So, even if Disco Stu entered Lois Green's birthday as "10/30/79", Disco Stu can display this lovely lady's birthday as "October 30, 1979", or "30 October 1979" for his Disco compadres across the pond. Finally, a calculated control allows Disco Stu to transform what may be a short value (like SDF) that means the world to Disco Stu into a more explicit display (like "Single Discoing Female") that means something to the rest of us.

Input masks set how Disco Stu will enter his data in the first place and how the data is stored; they don't necessarily dictate how it will look on a report or a display.
10. Finally, Disco Stu is ready to present his results to Flanders. Something of an Access guru himself, Flanders asks to see Disco Stu's database, and the erstwhile matchmaker complies: "Disco Stu has nothing to hide." "Boy, that's a gosh-diddly great setup you have there, Disco Stu," says Flanders. "Can I tweak it for you just a guldarn bit?" After sorting out the possible unsavory aspects of Flanders' "tweaking", Disco Stu acquiesces. Flanders sits down and opens the SQL Server window on Disco Stu's computer. Three hours later, with Flanders still at it, Disco Stu resigns himself to the fact that Flanders is not Lovely Disco Lady material: "I knew I should have disco ducked this assignment." What does SQL stand for?

Answer: Structured Query Language

While Access is a relatively user-friendly application that is very good for the average small business or home user (or for a manager in a larger firm who deals with single-user databases), SQL is a language more suited to handling larger databases that are accessed by many users, sometimes numbering in the tens of thousands.

In addition to these powerful business applications, SQL can be helpful for the more modest user as well as for more subtle or involved queries. For this reason, SQL Desktop Edition is usually packaged with Microsoft Access, and Access is fully compatible with SQL. I'm not sure whom Flanders is compatible with; I can only imagine what he is doing with SQL right now in lieu of a date.
Source: Author stuthehistoryguy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor crisw before going online.
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