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Quiz about Famous Cycling Nicknames
Quiz about Famous Cycling Nicknames

Famous Cycling Nicknames Trivia Quiz


Professional cycling has been blessed with many colorful personalities throughout its history. See if you can recognize these great riders by their nicknames. Good luck!

A multiple-choice quiz by 3thornes. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
3thornes
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
187,116
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
1016
Last 3 plays: tiye (9/10), Guest 92 (7/10), matthewpokemon (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. In my day, I was among the most feared riders in the peloton. They called me the Cannibal. Who am I? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. I was known for my aggressive style. My 'never give up attitude' was why people called me the Badger. Who am I? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. My absolute control of the peloton during the Tour de France, and my meticulous preparation to prepare for it, have led some to refer to me as the Boss. Who am I? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. My trademark bandana and earring were a few of the reasons I was called the Pirate. Who am I? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. I am among the most powerful time-trialists to have ever ridden a bike. They called me Big Mig. Who am I? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. My success on the bike helped heal a proud country that had been brought to its knees as WWII ended. I was known as the Champion of Champions. Who am I? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. I was a successful rider in the 60s and 70s, widely regarded as France's best during that time period. I'm known in cycling lore, though, as the Eternal Second. Who am I? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. One of the greatest Belgian riders of all-time, I was most frequently known as the Gypsy, though my success at one particular classic earned me the name of Mr. Paris-Roubaix. Who am I? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. I was the first of three riders to win all five of cycling's major classics (Paris-Roubaix, Milan-San Remo, Tour of Flanders, Leige-Bastogne-Leige, and the Tour of Flanders). I was the King of the Classics. Who am I? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. In my prime, I was the fastest man on two wheels. I was the Lion King. Who am I? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Apr 07 2024 : tiye: 9/10
Mar 30 2024 : Guest 92: 7/10
Mar 05 2024 : matthewpokemon: 7/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In my day, I was among the most feared riders in the peloton. They called me the Cannibal. Who am I?

Answer: Eddy Merckx

Eddy Merckx (who rode from 1965-1977), is generally regarded as the best rider to ever pedal a bike. He was not the best sprinter, time trialer, or climber, but his ambition and motivation was matched by none. He won well over 400 races and was known to attack the field even when leading the race.

He was the only rider to ever win all three jerseys at the same time, doing so when he won his first Tour de France in 1970. This impressive drive to win everything prompted one of his fellow riders to call him the Cannibal.
2. I was known for my aggressive style. My 'never give up attitude' was why people called me the Badger. Who am I?

Answer: Bernard Hinault

If not for Merckx, Bernard Hinault (who rode from 1975-1986) might be considered the greatest of all-time. He won the Tour de France five times and collected over 250 professional wins. He rode his best at all times, never gave up a fight, and like Merckx, had a tremendous drive to win. These combined to give him his nickname, the Badger.
3. My absolute control of the peloton during the Tour de France, and my meticulous preparation to prepare for it, have led some to refer to me as the Boss. Who am I?

Answer: Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong was a solid classics rider when he first entered the professional scene in the early 1990s, claiming a world championship at the tender age of 21, and becoming the first non-European to win a major classic. Cancer changed him, making him a lighter rider who knew how to suffer, ideal for stage racing. His single-minded drive on the Tour de France had made him the first rider to earn six victories. His approach to training has changed the way hopeful champions focus on the race. That, his control of the Blue Train (as his USPS team was known), and his mastery of the peloton during the Tour has led many in the cycling world to call him "the Boss."

He was subsequently stripped of all titles.
4. My trademark bandana and earring were a few of the reasons I was called the Pirate. Who am I?

Answer: Marco Pantani

Marco Pantani was among the greatest climbers to grace the peloton (he rode from 1992-2003). His light, wirey build made him ideally suited for the mountains, and it was there that he would build his legacy. In 1998, he achieved a rare double, winning the Giro d'Italia and the Tour de France. Both races saw him launch devasting attacks in the mountains which gained him enough time to hold off his rivals in the time trials.

His zeal for attacking when the climbing was at its worst, along with his distinctive bandana, shaved head, and earring, led his fans to call him Il Pirata, the Pirate. Tragically, Marco Pantani was beset by doping allegations late in his career and died of a cocaine overdose in 2004.
5. I am among the most powerful time-trialists to have ever ridden a bike. They called me Big Mig. Who am I?

Answer: Miguel Indurain

Miguel Indurain (who raced from 1985-1996) was the most dominant stage racer of the 1990s. He was a big rider (1.88m) who pushed huge gears, and it wasn't until he was going for his sixth Tour de France in 1996, that he cracked. He was also a savvy rider, crushing his rivals in the race against the clock (time trials) and holding on in the mountains.

The huge engine that powered him to five consecutive Tour victories (1991-1995), earned him the name "Big Mig."
6. My success on the bike helped heal a proud country that had been brought to its knees as WWII ended. I was known as the Champion of Champions. Who am I?

Answer: Fausto Coppi

Fausto Coppi began racing professionally in 1940 (and won his last race in 1954), but his battles after the war ended in the classics and tours with another great rider, Gino Bartali, are legendary. He won the Giro d'Italia five times, and the Tour de France twice.

He frequently dominated the competition, and won the climbers jersey as well as the yellow jersey in both Tours. His success over the other great riders of his era made him the Campionissimo, the Champion of Champions.
7. I was a successful rider in the 60s and 70s, widely regarded as France's best during that time period. I'm known in cycling lore, though, as the Eternal Second. Who am I?

Answer: Raymond Poulidor

Raymond Poulidor, also known as Pou-Pou by the French fans, raced professionally from 1960 to 1976. During that time, he was second or third eight times in the Tour, and four times at the World Championship. Despite placing so well in so many Tours, he never once wore the yellow jersey, making him perhaps the best rider to never don that jersey.

He was extremely popular with the French fans, who appreciated his efforts (he placed 3rd in 1976 at the age of 40!). His many near misses have made him the Eternal Second.
8. One of the greatest Belgian riders of all-time, I was most frequently known as the Gypsy, though my success at one particular classic earned me the name of Mr. Paris-Roubaix. Who am I?

Answer: Roger De Vlaeminck

Roger De Vlaeminck (who raced from 1969 - 1984) rode at the same time as fellow Belgian Eddy Merckx. He was not a great stage racer, but his exceptional bike handling skills and physical strength led him to excel in the classics. He rode the Paris-Roubaix race 14 times and never finished worse than seventh! He won the race a record four times as well.

His luck at this race (his first flat in this rugged race occurred during his 11 attempt in 1979, and he still placed 2nd) and his success made him, Mr. Paris-Roubaix.
9. I was the first of three riders to win all five of cycling's major classics (Paris-Roubaix, Milan-San Remo, Tour of Flanders, Leige-Bastogne-Leige, and the Tour of Flanders). I was the King of the Classics. Who am I?

Answer: Rik Van Looy

Rik Van Looy (who raced from 1953 to 1970) was a master of the one-day race, and amassed 379 professional victories in his 18 year career. He had eight major classic wins to go along with his world championship, and along the way won almost every other one-day race at least once. Though not a great stage racer, he won the points jersey in the 1963 tour, the climbers jersey in the 1960 Giro, and placed third while winning the points jersey in the Vuelta in both 1959 and 1965.

His stunning success at the shorter races though made him the King of the Classics.
10. In my prime, I was the fastest man on two wheels. I was the Lion King. Who am I?

Answer: Mario Cipollini

Mario Cipollini, also known as Super Mario, began racing in 1989 and during the late 1990s became the most feared sprinter in the peloton. He won a record 42 stages in the Giro d'Italia, and compiled numerous other stage wins in the Tour (12 wins) and various classics.

He also won the World Championship in 2002. His wavy golden hair, ferocious explosions of power on the bike, and regal manner off the bike led many to call him the Lion King.
Source: Author 3thornes

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Nightmare before going online.
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