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Quiz about A Merry Legal Christmas
Quiz about A Merry Legal Christmas

A Merry Legal Christmas Trivia Quiz


One of the joys of Christmas is relaxing in a cozy chair next to the fireplace and enjoying the newspaper. Except this newspaper article is about to inform you of ten unusual law-related events that involve Christmas!

A multiple-choice quiz by trident. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
trident
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
371,940
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
1945
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. In the 1600s, Puritan New England was not a friendly atmosphere if one wanted to celebrate Christmas. The pilgrims of Plymouth Colony showed their disdain for the holiday by spending their first Christmas Day working in the fields; the holiday was eventually outlawed. What did the Puritans in New England call Christmas? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Parliament under Oliver Cromwell outlawed the eating of festive meals on Christmas Day, leading many in modern-day England to believe that they cannot "legally" eat what famous English Christmas treat? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. In 1980, the U.S. court case Florey v. Sioux Falls School District went to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Roger Florey, the plaintiff, brought the lawsuit on his child's school because of what principal concern? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Leftovers from Prohibition, many U.S. states and Canadian provinces have had legal bans on the sale of which of the following on Christmas Day? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Restaurants in London and elsewhere have asked their customers to sign what legal document before they eat their Christmas pudding (or plum pudding as it is sometimes known) in case they chip a tooth on the silver coins that are often hidden within? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Plaintiffs in the U.S. have filed multiple lawsuits against an Arizona sheriff because he has played Christmas music 12 hours, non-stop, in what venue? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. In 2001, a receptionist in Ontario, Canada, sued her employer, Sutton Group Incentive Realty, after she left her employer's Christmas party, drove home intoxicated and hit another car. The receptionist claimed her employer was responsible because they should have prevented her from leaving the Christmas party. What was the original ruling of the case? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. A Canadian filmmaker sued what production company (which is also associated with a greeting card company) for $7 million (USD) after he claimed that they stole his idea for a Christmas film about a boy who meets an angel and gains the power to fly? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Signed into law by U.S. President George W. Bush, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 banned the use of incandescent light bulbs used in outdoor Christmas displays.


Question 10 of 10
10. In November 2014, a Manhattan landlord sued a Christmas tree vendor outside his residential building, claiming the vendor took up parking spots and blocked pedestrian traffic. The lawsuit cited an obscure 1938 law that claimed what? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In the 1600s, Puritan New England was not a friendly atmosphere if one wanted to celebrate Christmas. The pilgrims of Plymouth Colony showed their disdain for the holiday by spending their first Christmas Day working in the fields; the holiday was eventually outlawed. What did the Puritans in New England call Christmas?

Answer: Foolstide

Puritans found no scriptural reference to Christmas and considered it a pagan holiday. This belief was not unfounded, as pagan cultures had long celebrated the winter solstice as a time of gift-giving and celebration. Christians who immigrated to the New World and wanted Christmas Day off to relax were ostracized. Eventually this stigma wore off, but it was the prevailing idea for a long time in New England.
2. Parliament under Oliver Cromwell outlawed the eating of festive meals on Christmas Day, leading many in modern-day England to believe that they cannot "legally" eat what famous English Christmas treat?

Answer: mince pie

Here the Puritans were at work again to rid the world of Christmas. Parliament under Cromwell was said to have banned many festive foods, decorations, and events. However, these laws did not stay in effect once Charles II was restored to the monarchy. In modern times, they are effectively unenforceable.
3. In 1980, the U.S. court case Florey v. Sioux Falls School District went to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Roger Florey, the plaintiff, brought the lawsuit on his child's school because of what principal concern?

Answer: the singing of carols

The case of Florey v. Sioux Falls School District has been of special interest to the legal world due to it setting precedent for future cases of religion in public school. Roger Florey, an atheist parent, filed a lawsuit against the school, claiming that it was a violation of the separation of church and state if children were forced to sing religious Christmas carols.

The court held that the school's original policy was unconstitutional, but since the school district had revised its policy to include the songs of other religions as well as secular songs, the Christian religious songs were permitted as they were part of the school's broader curriculum.
4. Leftovers from Prohibition, many U.S. states and Canadian provinces have had legal bans on the sale of which of the following on Christmas Day?

Answer: alcoholic beverages

Bans on alcoholic beverages on Christmas Day may have seemed morally just in the past, but with the advent of Christmas traditions such as the drinking of eggnog and celebrating with office Christmas parties, these laws now have the dubious honor of seeming dated.
5. Restaurants in London and elsewhere have asked their customers to sign what legal document before they eat their Christmas pudding (or plum pudding as it is sometimes known) in case they chip a tooth on the silver coins that are often hidden within?

Answer: liability waiver

While most diners would be angry if a metal coin were found in their food, it it is meant to be a sign of good luck if you find it in your Christmas pudding. However, some restaurant owners have found it necessary to provide waivers to anyone who orders the pudding in case the diner isn't paying attention and bites into the coins.

Signing waivers in restaurants has become somewhat commonplace; some restaurants have waivers for specialized foods such as rare meats and extremely spicy sauces. While some of the appeal of having a waiver for such items is for novelty's sake, it also helps protect the restaurant owner for liability: a double bonus for owners.
6. Plaintiffs in the U.S. have filed multiple lawsuits against an Arizona sheriff because he has played Christmas music 12 hours, non-stop, in what venue?

Answer: county jails

Sheriff Joe Arpaio has been known to subject his inmates to unusual disciplinary actions such as wearing pink clothing as a punishment and allowing certain inmates only to eat bologna sandwiches. The inmates in his system considered the constant barrage of Christmas tunes to be more of the same.
7. In 2001, a receptionist in Ontario, Canada, sued her employer, Sutton Group Incentive Realty, after she left her employer's Christmas party, drove home intoxicated and hit another car. The receptionist claimed her employer was responsible because they should have prevented her from leaving the Christmas party. What was the original ruling of the case?

Answer: The plaintiff was awarded over $300,000 (CAD).

Having suffered brain injuries from the alcohol-related accident that left her unable to gain willful employment, the plaintiff sought damages. The original judge in the case ruled that the receptionist was partially responsible, so the $300,000 sum was actually lowered from a larger amount.

While the original ruling was thrown out and the case settled out of court, this case is famous amongst lawyers as one where liability can be shared by both consumers of alcohol as well as providers. Law professionals will often advise that Christmas party hosts, even in their own home, should find a suitable means of transportation for every guest that is consuming alcohol.
8. A Canadian filmmaker sued what production company (which is also associated with a greeting card company) for $7 million (USD) after he claimed that they stole his idea for a Christmas film about a boy who meets an angel and gains the power to fly?

Answer: Hallmark Productions

What was unusual in this type of lawsuit was that the filmmaker, Brad Wigor, had been in negotiation with Hallmark and was highly involved in the project until he had been forced out. Hallmark went ahead with the project, which had been the brainchild of Wigor. The film was meant to be titled "The Night Flyer".
9. Signed into law by U.S. President George W. Bush, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 banned the use of incandescent light bulbs used in outdoor Christmas displays.

Answer: False

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 was passed with the intention of phasing out incandescent light bulbs, which were considered inefficient. However, patio lighting and "specialized bulbs" such as Christmas lights were exempted from these energy efficiency standards.
10. In November 2014, a Manhattan landlord sued a Christmas tree vendor outside his residential building, claiming the vendor took up parking spots and blocked pedestrian traffic. The lawsuit cited an obscure 1938 law that claimed what?

Answer: Unlicensed street vendors can only sell Christmas trees in the month of December.

The 1938 law was actually passed in response to a blanket ban on Christmas tree sales by Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, who espoused his own version of a "War on Christmas trees". The mayor banned the selling of Christmas trees by unlicensed vendors, who were at the time mostly immigrants. The licenses were then effectively impossible to attain.

The voice of "Christmas jeer" soon made itself heard when Christmas trees were noticeably absent from the streets of New York City. The city council quickly passed an exception: the Christmas trees could be sold without a license, but only in the month of December.

A spokeswoman for the 2014 Manhattan landlord has stated that the lawsuit could not be fulfilled in 2014 since the defendants had packed up and left, but that if they tried it again the next year, the landlord would certainly file another lawsuit.
Source: Author trident

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