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Quiz about What a Wonderful Bird
Quiz about What a Wonderful Bird

What a Wonderful Bird Trivia Quiz


You've just emerged from an airplane after spending 13 hours crammed into seat 53E, dead center, last row. You swear to never again endure this - let's explore some premium and luxury air travel instead!

A photo quiz by WesleyCrusher. Estimated time: 7 mins.
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Time
7 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
356,429
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
1158
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: mermie316 (5/10), Guest 24 (6/10), Mjt74 (8/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. The first, quite affordable, upgrade you could make to your air travel plans would be to book a premium economy seat. Not all airlines offer this class and there is a vast range in quality between the offerings. Which, however, is a characteristic of all premium economy products? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. As an upgraded flier, you might also experience better hospitality at the airport - you could be invited to an airline lounge. While airline policies differ, the majority do adhere to one standard for free lounge access - who is by default invited? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. If you decide to upgrade to business class on a long-haul flight, you may enjoy the comfort of a flat-bed seat. Besides offering a full 180 recline, which other criterion must a seat's bed configuration meet to qualify as a true flat-bed? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Some airlines have invested quite some creativity into their plane configurations. The picture here shows the upper deck business class of a British Airways Boeing 747 - what is special about it? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Even paying a high price for your ticket might not always guarantee you a good seat, however. Passengers paying the equivalent of a first class fare might have been surprised to be seated in this rather cramped and spartanic cabin. Most of them however knew what expected them and gladly paid - this cabin belonged to which aircraft or type? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. If you want to take a scheduled airline flight, you can't go more luxurious than suite first class - a product offered by some airlines on their Airbus 380 and Boeing 747 long-haul jets. Emirates Air has added a gimmick to its A380 suite class that one would think little of on the ground but that actually represented a quite well-reported first in the air. Which convenience was this airline the first to offer to its first class passengers on a commercial jetliner? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. If first class is still not spacious enough for you, you would have been a happier passenger in the 1930s. The photo associated with this question shows a lounge that was actually used on transatlantic flights - what aircraft was it on? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. If you want to go beyond the luxuries a normal airline seat can offer you, you will need to charter or outright buy a private jet. The leading manufacturer for small business jets with up to 12 seats is the Canadian company Bombardier. Most of these jets are however sold under a different brand name, originally belonging to a company bought by Bombardier in 1990. Which of Bombardier's subsidiaries serves this small jet segment? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. If a business jet is still not large enough for you, you can of course purchase a full-scale commercial airliner and have it refurbished as a private jet for your personal travel needs. Airbus and Boeing actually maintain special divisions for custom jets, usually for corporate use. Which of the Airbus model lines (pictured to the left in regular airliner livery) is the most common basis of Airbus corporate jets? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. By the time you can think of a Boeing or Airbus private jet, you will have to be quite among the wealthy - we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars! A cheaper, but also not easy, alternative to get access to such a jet would be to be elected a head of state or other top government official. Which of the following countries could however not offer its president or prime minister the luxury of a flying office such as the one shown here? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
May 18 2024 : mermie316: 5/10
May 07 2024 : Guest 24: 6/10
Apr 28 2024 : Mjt74: 8/10
Apr 14 2024 : matthewpokemon: 8/10
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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The first, quite affordable, upgrade you could make to your air travel plans would be to book a premium economy seat. Not all airlines offer this class and there is a vast range in quality between the offerings. Which, however, is a characteristic of all premium economy products?

Answer: Additional legroom

When premium economy seats were first offered on airliners in the 1990s, they were just normal economy seats with extra legroom - anywhere between two and five inches (5-12 cm). Today, many premium economy products are separate cabins with a slightly wider seat, more legroom, more recline and often better food and beverages than in the main cabin. Depending on the quality of the product, such a seat can be between just a few dollars more expensive than a normal economy seat and approximately twice its price. On a long flight, however, this can very much be worth it and all you need to arrive relaxed and well!
2. As an upgraded flier, you might also experience better hospitality at the airport - you could be invited to an airline lounge. While airline policies differ, the majority do adhere to one standard for free lounge access - who is by default invited?

Answer: First and business class passengers and second tier or higher ("gold") frequent fliers

While some airlines have a basic lounge for their premium economy passengers, the standard is to have a business lounge (which admits business class passengers and first tier frequent fliers) and, at larger airports, a separate first class lounge for the first class and top-tier frequent fliers. Most airports today also offer lounges not affiliated with any airline that anyone can enter for a payment, usually around twenty dollars. Lounges offer snacks, beverages, internet access and, most importantly, some quiet and comfortable sitting space away from the bustle of the airport.
3. If you decide to upgrade to business class on a long-haul flight, you may enjoy the comfort of a flat-bed seat. Besides offering a full 180 recline, which other criterion must a seat's bed configuration meet to qualify as a true flat-bed?

Answer: It must be level and horizontal

In long-haul business class, some sort of sleeper seat is almost a must-have feature for any airline. Yet, only some of them extend the amenity of a fully flat, horizontal bed to their "lesser" premium customers, instead offering a lie-flat configuration that is however somewhat angled.

Besides making seat construction easier, this type of build also allows one passenger's feet to slide under the previous row's head area, thus saving several inches of space per row. If you want the best business class comfort, go for a true flatbed if you can find an airline offering it on your schedule and route - the fare is usually not higher than that for an angled bed.
4. Some airlines have invested quite some creativity into their plane configurations. The picture here shows the upper deck business class of a British Airways Boeing 747 - what is special about it?

Answer: The window seats face towards the rear

While it is not obviously apparent in the picture, the right side of this picture shows not three, but six business class seats. The window seats are reversed to face the rear of the plane, so passengers are flying backwards. This setup provides a very high level of comfort on surprisingly little space. Each pair of seats forms a yin/yang pattern, affording the traveler a much larger width in the important area near the shoulders and upper body while requiring less width around the feet.

The two seats of a pair share a suite wall which can be raised or lowered to allow communication or privacy as desired.

This seating pattern is becoming rather popular for business class arrangements and might in the future also be used in premium economy and economy cabins.
5. Even paying a high price for your ticket might not always guarantee you a good seat, however. Passengers paying the equivalent of a first class fare might have been surprised to be seated in this rather cramped and spartanic cabin. Most of them however knew what expected them and gladly paid - this cabin belonged to which aircraft or type?

Answer: A Concorde (1990s)

This cabin, actually offering less space than an average Boeing 737 economy cabin, belongs to the Concorde, the only supersonic passenger jet in regular use in the 20th century. Operated by British Airways and Air France, these planes flew transatlantic routes from London and Paris to New York, over twice as fast than a normal jet. Concorde was, in spite of the high fare, never really profitable due to the rather small fleet of only 20 planes for both airlines and the high fuel cost.

The disastrous crash of Flight 4590 near Paris in 2000 grounded the aircraft for 16 months and, in spite of refits to restore airworthiness to the remaining fleet, Concorde bookings never recovered and the remaining planes were removed from service in 2003. Out of the 19 remaining craft, only one or two are in a condition that leave even the slightest hope of restoring them for demonstration flights.
6. If you want to take a scheduled airline flight, you can't go more luxurious than suite first class - a product offered by some airlines on their Airbus 380 and Boeing 747 long-haul jets. Emirates Air has added a gimmick to its A380 suite class that one would think little of on the ground but that actually represented a quite well-reported first in the air. Which convenience was this airline the first to offer to its first class passengers on a commercial jetliner?

Answer: Showers

In-flight showers are and will always remain a major luxury because they are incredibly expensive to maintain - the water for each passenger's wash-down has to be transported over the entire distance, adding substantial weight to the jet even when only provided to the twelve or twenty lucky residents of first class. Bars have been standard in early Boeing 747s (in which they typically occupied the upper deck), Wi-Fi has first been introduced by US carriers and mobile phone use is still forbidden on planes worldwide as of early 2013 although some national authorities are now evaluating the possibility of allowing mobile phones to make data (but no voice) connections in-flight.
7. If first class is still not spacious enough for you, you would have been a happier passenger in the 1930s. The photo associated with this question shows a lounge that was actually used on transatlantic flights - what aircraft was it on?

Answer: A Zeppelin airship

Zeppelin airships - lighter-than-air dirigibles - were the most luxurious way ever to traverse the Atlantic in the air without needing to charter some private transportation. After the Hindenburg disaster of 1937 in Lakehurst, however, airships quickly fell out of service as hydrogen had proven too dangerous and the alternative, helium, was not yet available in large amounts. Airship travel was in comfort and atmosphere much more like a ship passage than a flight - there were no seat belts, the deck was relatively spacious and passengers had true cabins with bunk beds at their disposal. Speeds were low - about 125 kph (78 mph) - but still three times faster than those of the fastest ships, reducing Atlantic crossing times to just 60 hours westbound and 50 hours eastbound.
8. If you want to go beyond the luxuries a normal airline seat can offer you, you will need to charter or outright buy a private jet. The leading manufacturer for small business jets with up to 12 seats is the Canadian company Bombardier. Most of these jets are however sold under a different brand name, originally belonging to a company bought by Bombardier in 1990. Which of Bombardier's subsidiaries serves this small jet segment?

Answer: Learjet

If you've ever flown in a small business jet, chances are it was a Learjet. With a large palette of models, Learjets can carry up to 12 passengers with a range of up to 4,000 km (2,500 miles). Canadair and de Havilland are both active in the market for larger jets bridging the gap between the small, agile Learjets and the full-scale offerings by Boeing and Airbus.

The largest of these jets have around 50 seats and are often used by airlines for regional flights. Short Brothers is defunct as an aircraft manufacturer but continues to exist as a provider of defense technology.
9. If a business jet is still not large enough for you, you can of course purchase a full-scale commercial airliner and have it refurbished as a private jet for your personal travel needs. Airbus and Boeing actually maintain special divisions for custom jets, usually for corporate use. Which of the Airbus model lines (pictured to the left in regular airliner livery) is the most common basis of Airbus corporate jets?

Answer: The A320 line

Most Airbus corporate jets are actually A318s or A319s, shortened versions of the A320, but there are also full-length 320s being manufactured for this segment. These jets can be customized in many ways, including the use of some freight space (which is typically not needed in large amounts on these craft) for additional fuel capacity, thus extending the service range of these planes to intercontinental levels.

However, Airbus offers all its jets for customization, including the flagship A380 model, of which one craft is on order as a "Flying Palace" for Saudi Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal.

The largest delivered Airbus commercial jet (as of 2013) is based on the A340.
10. By the time you can think of a Boeing or Airbus private jet, you will have to be quite among the wealthy - we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars! A cheaper, but also not easy, alternative to get access to such a jet would be to be elected a head of state or other top government official. Which of the following countries could however not offer its president or prime minister the luxury of a flying office such as the one shown here?

Answer: Iceland

Russia and Brazil, like the United States, both maintain an Air Force One plane exclusively for their presidents (the one shown here is the Brazilian one, based on an A319). Germany does not have a dedicated plane for any one official, but the Luftwaffe (German Air Force) has several such planes available for the use of high-ranking government officials.

The President of Iceland, on the other hand, enjoys no such luxury - he travels as a regular passenger, business class, on scheduled Icelandair flights. I have personally been seated just a few rows behind him on a flight into Iceland.
Source: Author WesleyCrusher

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor trident before going online.
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This quiz is part of series Commission #26:

It may seem like our authors took a walk on the wild side this time around. In this Commission from the Author's Lounge from January 2013, all of our titles were themed around animals.

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  12. Panda Sandwiches are Most Indigestible Very Easy

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