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Quiz about Wheres That Art London Edition
Quiz about Wheres That Art London Edition

Where's That Art? London Edition Quiz


London is home to a number of fantastic art galleries and museums. All you have to do is match these works of art, exhibitions or historical artifacts to their homes.

A multiple-choice quiz by suzidunc. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
suzidunc
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
356,532
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
339
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. "Sunflowers" (1888) by Vincent van Gogh.

Although Van Gogh painted 2 series of paintings of sunflowers, perhaps the most recognisable, yellow hued version resides in London. In which famous gallery would you find it?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Although this gallery does not hold permanent exhibitions, it has, over the years, housed some of the most contemporary and most controversial works of art produced in the twenty-first century. Damien Hirst's "The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living" was first exhibited here in 1992. Which gallery was this? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. John Constable's "Flatford Mill (Scene on a Navigable River)" (1816).

In which London gallery would you find this iconic painting?
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. One of London's art galleries has a yearly tradition of commissioning internationally acclaimed artists to design a temporary pavilion for its lawn. In 2012, the pavilion was designed by Ai Weiwei and Herzog & de Meuron.

Which gallery is this?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. In January 2013, the first official portrait of HRH Duchess of Cambridge was unveiled. It was painted by controversial artist Paul Emsley.

In which London gallery was this portrait unveiled and subsequently housed?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. "The Swimming Reindeer" is a 13,000 year old sculpture carved from the tip of a mammoth's tusk. Although it was found in France, it is housed in London. Where would you find this early sculpture? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. "A fly on sugar crystals" (2010) by Dave McCarthy and Annie Cavanagh.

In which London museum would you find this work of art?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. "Gassed" (1919) by John Singer Sargent.

Where is the London home of this painting?
Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. "Jacob de Gheyn III" (1632) by Rembrandt is one of the most stolen and recovered pieces of artwork in the world. Most recently it was stolen in 1983 and recovered soon after.

Where would you find this portrait in London?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. "The Lady With A Fan" (c.1638) by Diego Velázquez.

Where would you find this painting in London?
Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. "Sunflowers" (1888) by Vincent van Gogh. Although Van Gogh painted 2 series of paintings of sunflowers, perhaps the most recognisable, yellow hued version resides in London. In which famous gallery would you find it?

Answer: National Gallery

The National Gallery stands on Trafalgar Square in central London, facing Nelson's Column. The gallery was founded in 1824 and is now run by the British government's Department of Culture, Media and Sport as an exempt charity. It houses over 2,300 paintings from the thirteenth century to 1900, including internationally famous works such as Leonardo da Vinci's "Virgin of the Rocks", Sandro Boticelli's "Venus and Mars" and "The Ambassadors" by Hans Holbein the Younger.

Van Gogh painted two series of paintings of sunflowers. The first series was painted in 1887, while he lived in Paris with his brother, and depicts sunflowers lying on the ground. The second series followed in 1888 when van Gogh moved to Arles and depicts the flowers in vases. The yellow hued painting in the National Gallery is perhaps one of the most recognisable of all of Van Gogh's works.
2. Although this gallery does not hold permanent exhibitions, it has, over the years, housed some of the most contemporary and most controversial works of art produced in the twenty-first century. Damien Hirst's "The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living" was first exhibited here in 1992. Which gallery was this?

Answer: Saatchi Gallery

The Saatchi Gallery was set up by Charles Saatchi in 1985 as a gallery for contemporary art. Its current home is in Chelsea, London and it is often used as a place to showcase the works of unknown artists, effectively launching their careers.

In 2010, Saatchi announced that he would give the gallery over to the public, and that it should now be known as "Museum of Contemporary Art for London".

"The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living" was funded by Saatchi and first exhibited in 1992 in a series of Young British Artists shows at the Saatchi Gallery. It features a shark preserved in formaldehyde solution. Due to decay and poor preservation, the shark was replaced with a new specimen in 2006.
3. John Constable's "Flatford Mill (Scene on a Navigable River)" (1816). In which London gallery would you find this iconic painting?

Answer: Tate Britain

The Tate Britain sits on Millbank in London. Opened in 1897, it was built on top of the original site of Millbank Prison and was founded by Sir Henry Tate in a series of his gallery openings accross the UK.

"Flatford Mill" is one of Constable's largest paintings and was mainly painted outdoors. Constable never sold this particular painting, so his daughter Isabel bequeathed it to the Tate Gallery in 1888.
4. One of London's art galleries has a yearly tradition of commissioning internationally acclaimed artists to design a temporary pavilion for its lawn. In 2012, the pavilion was designed by Ai Weiwei and Herzog & de Meuron. Which gallery is this?

Answer: Serpentine Gallery

The Serpentine Gallery is situated in Kensington Gardens, Hyde Park. The building is a classic 1934 tea pavilion, though the gallery was established only in 1970. The name comes from the Serpentine Lake close to the gallery.

Artists designing the temporary pavilions have included Peter Zumthor (2011), Jean Nouvel (2010) and Oscar Niemeyer (2003).
5. In January 2013, the first official portrait of HRH Duchess of Cambridge was unveiled. It was painted by controversial artist Paul Emsley. In which London gallery was this portrait unveiled and subsequently housed?

Answer: National Portrait Gallery

Though it adjoins the National Gallery on Trafalgar Square, the entrance to the National Portrait Gallery is actually found on St Martin's Place. It houses only portraits of historically important and famous British people. One of its best-known images is the Chandos portrait, the most famous (supposed) portrait of William Shakespeare.

The portrait of HRH Duchess of Cambridge caused controversy from the moment of its unveiling. Although the Duchess professed her admiration of the piece to the media, many critics were unimpressed.
6. "The Swimming Reindeer" is a 13,000 year old sculpture carved from the tip of a mammoth's tusk. Although it was found in France, it is housed in London. Where would you find this early sculpture?

Answer: British Museum

The sculpture was carved in the late Ice Age and is thought by scholars to be one of the earliest examples of sculpture or art that has ever been found. It was discovered in two parts in France in 1866. The sculpture is kept in a controlled atmosphere and is rarely moved as it is likely to turn to dust if handled roughly.

Established in 1753, and opened to the public in 1759 on its current site in Bloomsbury, London, the British Museum houses one of the largest collections of historical artifacts and art in the world. Its permanent collection encompasses over 8 million artifacts. Due to the British Empire's global footprint during the nineteenth century, the museum now holds a great many artifacts originating from other parts of the world. Many of those artifacts are, as such, the subject of controversy in relation to whether they should be returned to their country of origin (e.g. the Elgin Marbles from the Parthenon in Greece).
7. "A fly on sugar crystals" (2010) by Dave McCarthy and Annie Cavanagh. In which London museum would you find this work of art?

Answer: Wellcome Collection

The Wellcome Collection is unique in that it displays a mixture of medical artifacts and original artworks which seek to show the connections between medicine and art. Housed within the Wellcome Trust Centre at UCL Hospital on Euston Road, London, the collection was established by Sir Henry Solomon Wellcome in the nineteenth century in order to showcase his collection of artifacts following his extensive travels.

"A fly on sugar crystals" is a large-scale colour-enhanced scanning electron micrograph image showing a fly eating sugar.
8. "Gassed" (1919) by John Singer Sargent. Where is the London home of this painting?

Answer: Imperial War Museum

"Gassed" (1919) focuses on the aftermath of a mustard gas attack during the First World War. The painting was completed after the war on commission from the British War Memorials Committee of the British Ministry of Information. In particular, as Sargent was American, he was asked to show Anglo-American co-operation in his painting.

The Imperial War Museum was first opened in 1920 in the Crystal Palace at Sydenham. It has since moved to a permanent home on the site of an old hospital on the Lambeth Road in Southwark. As well as its huge collection of wartime memorabilia, it houses a large collection of war-related artworks. In 2012 the museum reported the size of its art collection as being 84,980 items strong.
9. "Jacob de Gheyn III" (1632) by Rembrandt is one of the most stolen and recovered pieces of artwork in the world. Most recently it was stolen in 1983 and recovered soon after. Where would you find this portrait in London?

Answer: Dulwich Picture Gallery

Situated in South London, the Dulwich Picture Gallery was opened to the public in 1817 and is the oldest public art gallery in England. It houses one of the largest collections of "Old Masters" in the world.

Jacob III de Gheyn (1596-1641), was a Dutch engraver. His portrait was part of a duo of portraits by Rembrandt, the other being of his friend Maurits Huygens who was depicted facing the opposite way but wearing the same clothing. The painting was first stolen in 1966 along with seven others, but all were recovered soon after. It has now been stolen and recovered four times, having been found in such places as the back of a bicycle, a bench in a graveyard and a left luggage office in Germany. The painting is now closely guarded.
10. "The Lady With A Fan" (c.1638) by Diego Velázquez. Where would you find this painting in London?

Answer: The Wallace Collection

The Wallace Collection opened to the public in 1900 and still remains in its original site on Manchester Square in Marylebone. The collection was bequeathed to the nation by the widow of Sir Robert Wallace under the condition that no part of it ever leave the museum, even for loans. As such, the works have never been moved.

The lady in the portrait has not been identified, despite the fact that most of Velázquez's paintings were of easily recognisable members of the Spanish royalty and their court. A variant of the portrait, the "Lady in a Mantilla", is on display at Chatsworth House in Derbyshire.
Source: Author suzidunc

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor looney_tunes before going online.
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