FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Vietnam A War Set To Music
Quiz about Vietnam A War Set To Music

Vietnam: A War Set To Music Trivia Quiz


Few conflicts have inspired so many songs as Vietnam. Many of those songs reflected - some say inflamed - public opinion of an unpopular war.

A multiple-choice quiz by darksplash. Estimated time: 7 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Music Trivia
  6. »
  7. Something in Common
  8. »
  9. Political Songs

Author
darksplash
Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
340,592
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
11 / 15
Plays
697
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
- -
Question 1 of 15
1. "And it's one, two, three,
What are we fighting for?
Don't ask me, I don't give a damn,
Next stop is Vietnam...."

was the raucous sing-along chorus of song by a 1960s band. Who were they?
Hint


Question 2 of 15
2. "When I landed in Vietnam
I hardly got to see Saigon
They shaped us up and called the roll
And off we went on a long patrol
Swatting flies
Swapping lies
Firing the odd shot here and there..."

Which prolific writer of songs about Vietnam imagined this less than dramatic life for soldiers there?
Hint


Question 3 of 15
3. "They got a building down New York City, it's called Whitehall Street,
where you walk in, you get injected, inspected, detected, infected,
neglected and selected...."

You get can anything you want if you can answer this: which singer/songwriter built a career on a song about his Vietnam draft board experiences, and also starred as himself in the movie of the song?
Hint


Question 4 of 15
4. "Oh, I'm just a typical American boy from a typical American town
I believe in God and Senator Dodd and a-keepin' old Castro down
And when it came my time to serve I knew better dead than red
But when I got to my old draft board, buddy, this is what I said..."

Which folkie did not want to fight but declared: "If you ever get a war without blood and gore
I'll be the first to go"?
Hint


Question 5 of 15
5. Which veteran folk singer hammered out the message about the troops sent to fight in Vietnam:

"If you love this land of the free
Bring 'em home, bring 'em home
Bring them back from overseas
Bring 'em home, bring 'em home

It will make the politicians sad, I know
Bring 'em home, bring 'em home
They wanna tangle with their foe
Bring 'em home, bring 'em home...."?
Hint


Question 6 of 15
6. "As I look around the little house we were so happy in
I think of all the happy times we'll never see again
Then I break down and start to cry, the children ask what for
I can't find a way to tell them that Daddy won't be home anymore..."

Which southern country songbird tried to find words to explain about a soldier who didn't make it home from war?
Hint


Question 7 of 15
7. "We met as soul mates on Parris Island
We left as inmates from an asylum
And we were sharp, as sharp as knives
And we were so gung ho to lay down our lives..."

Which piano man imagined what it was like for some of the grunts who were sent off to war?
Hint


Question 8 of 15
8. "Sam Stone came home,
To his wife and family
After serving in the conflict overseas.
And in the time that he had served,
It had shattered all his nerves,
And it left a little shrapnel in his knee...."

Which Illinois-born songwriter picked up the story of a GI who had served and been wounded in Vietnam?
Hint


Question 9 of 15
9. "Farewell my wistful Saigon bride
I'm going out to stem the tide
A tide that never saw the seas
It flows through jungles, round the trees
Some say it's yellow, some say red
It will not matter when we're dead..."

Which singer, who believed that love was just a four letter word, co-wrote this bittersweet Vietnam love song?
Hint


Question 10 of 15
10. "I was on leave at the time, just duckin' the fog
Nosin' around like a hungry dog
In that crazy place called Washington DC
I saw a crowd of people on the White House lawn
All carryin' signs about Vietnam
So I went over to see what was goin' on
It was a strange lookin' bunch
But then I never could understand some people..."

Which real-life veteran of the war wrote of his amazement at the anti-war protests in a song called "Vietnam Blues"?
Hint


Question 11 of 15
11. "Got on a plane in 'Frisco
and got off in Vietnam
I walked into a different world
the past forever gone

I could have gone to Canada
or I could have stayed in school
But I was brought up differently
I couldn't break the rules..."

Which group had their feet firmly on the ground when they told the tale of a young man who decided that serving was more honourable than running away, but ten years afterwards found himself "Still In Saigon"?
Hint


Question 12 of 15
12. "I got a friend named Whiskey Sam
He was my boonierat buddy for a year in Nam
He said is my country just a little off track
Took 'em twenty-five years to welcome me back
But, it's better than not coming back at all
Many a good man
I saw fall And even now,
every time I dream I hear the men
and the monkeys in the jungle scream..."

Which country singer noted for apparel of a noir hue wrote about the length of time it took some in America to become reconciled to those who served?
Hint


Question 13 of 15
13. "Here we are again my friends
We're back in Vietnam
Back in Vietnam
We're back in Vietnam
Back in Vietnam..."

This was the chorus of a song that portrayed combatants in Vietnam as pirates. Which four-in-a-row Grammy winner wrote it?
Hint


Question 14 of 15
14. "In 1965 Vietnam seemed like just another foreign war
but it wasn't
It was different in many ways, as so were those that did the fighting
In World War II the average age of the combat soldier was 26
In Vietnam he was 19..."

Who was the English singer behind this UK chart-topping hit that (inaccurately) claimed the average age at which US soldiers in Vietnam died was 19?
Hint


Question 15 of 15
15. Many of the songs that were written about the Vietnam War questioned, or even opposed, America's involvement. Which Okie from Muskogee took a contrary view when he sang:

"I hear people talkin' bad,
About the way we have to live here in this country,
Harpin' on the wars we fight,
An' gripin' 'bout the way things oughta be.
An' I don't mind 'em switchin' sides,
An' standin' up for things they believe in.
When they're runnin' down my country, man,
They're walkin' on the fightin' side of me."?
Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Mar 23 2024 : Guest 82: 8/15
Mar 13 2024 : Guest 208: 12/15

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. "And it's one, two, three, What are we fighting for? Don't ask me, I don't give a damn, Next stop is Vietnam...." was the raucous sing-along chorus of song by a 1960s band. Who were they?

Answer: Country Joe and the Fish

"Country Joe" McDonald and his band The Fish hailed out of San Francisco and "I-Feel-Like-I'm-Fixin'-To-Die Rag" was on their second album, which was released in 1967. The band was active between 1966 and 1971 and reformed on occasions after that.
2. "When I landed in Vietnam I hardly got to see Saigon They shaped us up and called the roll And off we went on a long patrol Swatting flies Swapping lies Firing the odd shot here and there..." Which prolific writer of songs about Vietnam imagined this less than dramatic life for soldiers there?

Answer: Tom Paxton

In "Talking Vietnam Pot Luck Blues", Paxton dealt with the allegations that GIs were on drugs a lot of the time, and he even had US and Viet Cong patrols sharing some weed:
"Straight from Uncle Ho's victory garden.
We call it Hanoi Gold."

Paxton wrote many songs during the course of the war and, as he noted in concerts, afterwards. The songs included "Jimmy Newman", "Bayonet Rap", "My Son John", "Born On the Fourth Of July", "Lyndon Johnson Told The Nation" and "Peace Will Come".
Born in Chicago in 1937, Paxton's family moved away when he was ten and eventually settled in Oklahoma, which he considered to be his 'home'. His volume of work included protest songs, love songs, children's songs and songs of social comment.
3. "They got a building down New York City, it's called Whitehall Street, where you walk in, you get injected, inspected, detected, infected, neglected and selected...." You get can anything you want if you can answer this: which singer/songwriter built a career on a song about his Vietnam draft board experiences, and also starred as himself in the movie of the song?

Answer: Arlo Guthrie

"You can get anything you want at Alice's Restaurant
You can get anything you want at Alice's Restaurant
Walk right in it's around the back
Just a half a mile from the railroad track
You can get anything you want at Alice's Restaurant..."

Some of the other lyrics are not repeatable on a family oriented site such as this, sufficient to say Guthrie found that his criminal conviction for littering was considered abhorrent among the murderers and rapists he (allegedly) met at the Draft offices.
"Alice's Restaurant Masacree" was the tale of Guthrie's arrest for littering in Stockbridge Massachusetts, and its effect when he was called to the draft board. It was made into a movie in 1967.
Arlo Guthrie was born at Coney Island, New York, in 1947 and was a son of the legendary master of the folk music genre, Woody Guthrie.
Guthrie claimed that his Draft board experiences were based on truth. In a busy career, he reprised many of his father's songs, and also sang and recorded regularly with his father's great collaborator, Pete Seeger. He was also noted for bringing Steve Goodman's "City of New Orleans" to widespread attention and it remained a staple of his concerts for many years.
4. "Oh, I'm just a typical American boy from a typical American town I believe in God and Senator Dodd and a-keepin' old Castro down And when it came my time to serve I knew better dead than red But when I got to my old draft board, buddy, this is what I said..." Which folkie did not want to fight but declared: "If you ever get a war without blood and gore I'll be the first to go"?

Answer: Phil Ochs

Born in El Paso, Texas, in 1940, Phil Ochs was a writer of some of the most poetic lyrics of the 1960s and also created some of the decade's most passionate protest songs. There included songs about Civil Rights and Vietnam. "One More Parade" and (although not totally about Vietnam), "I Ain't Marchin' Anymore" found a place among war protesters, while "The War Is Over" predicted the human consequences of the ending of the conflict.
("Draft Dodger's Rag" refers to Senator Thomas J. Dodd, of Connecticut, a noted anti-communist campaigner.)
To many in the 1960s, Ochs was a songwriting equal of Bob Dylan, but while Dylan moved away from protest songs towards more mainstream pop and rock, Ochs appear trapped in the troubadour/protest singer genre.
A manic depressive, Ochs seemed to lose his way, musically, when the war ended. He died by suicide in 1976.
5. Which veteran folk singer hammered out the message about the troops sent to fight in Vietnam: "If you love this land of the free Bring 'em home, bring 'em home Bring them back from overseas Bring 'em home, bring 'em home It will make the politicians sad, I know Bring 'em home, bring 'em home They wanna tangle with their foe Bring 'em home, bring 'em home...."?

Answer: Pete Seeger

Seeger was born in Manhattan in 1919 and became one of the most influential singers of the late 1950s and 1960s. An avowed Communist, he survived (just about) the McCarthy blacklists and wrote or co-wrote a lengthy catalogue of protest songs. These included ""If I Had A Hammer", "Where Have All The Flowers Gone", "Waist Deep in the Big Muddy" and "We Shall Overcome".
Bruce Springsteen later sang "Bring 'em Home" about the war in Iraq.
6. "As I look around the little house we were so happy in I think of all the happy times we'll never see again Then I break down and start to cry, the children ask what for I can't find a way to tell them that Daddy won't be home anymore..." Which southern country songbird tried to find words to explain about a soldier who didn't make it home from war?

Answer: Dolly Parton

"Each night before they go to sleep they fold their little hands
And say a prayer for Daddy fighting in their far-off land
So tonight I'll help them say their prayers like I've always done before
God give me courage to tell them that Daddy won't be home anymore."

Born in Tennessee in 1946, Dolly Parton became one of the most popular female entertainers of her time. Her folksy, self-deprecating charm won her many fans in a career as a performer, songwriter and movie star.
In a singing career of more than 50 years, Parton had around 20 US Country number one singles.
7. "We met as soul mates on Parris Island We left as inmates from an asylum And we were sharp, as sharp as knives And we were so gung ho to lay down our lives..." Which piano man imagined what it was like for some of the grunts who were sent off to war?

Answer: Billy Joel

"We held the day in the palm of our hands
They ruled the nights, and the nights
Seemed to last as long as six weeks...
...On Parris Island
We held the coastline, they held the highlands
And they were sharp, as sharp as knives
They heard the hum of our motors
They counted the rotors
And waited for us to arrive..."

Born in The Bronx, NYC in 1949, Billy Joel was probably not noted for songs with deep meaning, but "Goodnight Saigon" reflected the hopelessness felt by many GIs in a war where the enemy would not stand still and fight face to face.
Other 'political' Joel songs included "Leningrad", "We Didn't Start The Fire", and "Allentown"
While his body of work was greatly admired, in a 30-year career from 1973, Joel scored just three number one US hits, "It's Still Rock and Roll to Me" in 1980, "Tell Her About It" in 1983, and "We Didn't Start the Fire" in 1987.
8. "Sam Stone came home, To his wife and family After serving in the conflict overseas. And in the time that he had served, It had shattered all his nerves, And it left a little shrapnel in his knee...." Which Illinois-born songwriter picked up the story of a GI who had served and been wounded in Vietnam?

Answer: John Prine

"Oh, but the morphine eased the pain,
And the grass grew round his brain,
And it gave him all the comfort as he lacked,
With a purple heart and a monkey on his back."

The song was entitled "Sam Stone" and told of a homecoming reality check. Other songs in a similar vein included Bill Dannoff"s "Readjustment Blues" (most famously covered by John Denver) and Tom Paxton's "My Son John".

John Prine was born in Maywood, Illinois, in 1946 and had a diverse career before turning to music. He served in the Vietnam-era US Army, but was stationed in Germany. Kris Kristofferson and Bob Dylan were both fans, and Prine had a professional relationship with Steve Goodman.
Prine's 1972 song "The Great Compromise" also dealt with Vietnam war issues.
9. "Farewell my wistful Saigon bride I'm going out to stem the tide A tide that never saw the seas It flows through jungles, round the trees Some say it's yellow, some say red It will not matter when we're dead..." Which singer, who believed that love was just a four letter word, co-wrote this bittersweet Vietnam love song?

Answer: Joan Baez

Baez included "Saigon Bride" on her 1967 album "Joan" She wrote the melody and the lyrics were by Nina Duscheck.

Born at Staten Island, New York in 1941, the Newport Folk Festival of 1959 brought Baez to the attention of a wide audience. Several well-received albums followed and throughout her career she was noted for the strength of her topical songs and her commitment to causes such as civil rights, poverty and peace. She opposed American military intervention in Iraq, as she had about Vietnam.
While her albums sold well and she was known to a loyal fan base, Baez had few hit singles. Her cover of Robbie Robinson's "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" was a US pop number three in 1969, while four years earlier her cover of "There But For Fortune" by Phil Ochs made number eight in the UK.
"Love Is Just a Four-Letter Word" was written by Baez's one-time lover Bob Dylan, but she became more associated with it than he ever did.
10. "I was on leave at the time, just duckin' the fog Nosin' around like a hungry dog In that crazy place called Washington DC I saw a crowd of people on the White House lawn All carryin' signs about Vietnam So I went over to see what was goin' on It was a strange lookin' bunch But then I never could understand some people..." Which real-life veteran of the war wrote of his amazement at the anti-war protests in a song called "Vietnam Blues"?

Answer: Kris Kristofferson

Born in Brownsville, Texas in 1936. Kris Kristofferson was something of a sportsman in his early life and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford in 1960, where he began writing songs. He came from a military family and joined the US Army, rising to the rank of Captain and flying helicopters. He left the Army in 1965 and embarked on a career of songwriting, singing and acting.
Dave Dudley recorded "Vietnam Blues" in 1966, becoming one of many to cover Kristofferson songs.
Well known compositions included "Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)", "Help Me Make It Through the Night", "Sunday Mornin' Comin' Down" and, of course, "Me And Bobby McGee".
Kristofferson sympathised with the soldiers who had served in Vietnam but in a 1993 interview he said: "My attitude towards Vietnam today is 180 degree different. We killed two million Vietnamese as well as killing 56,000 Americans. We did worse than that, though, I think we killed, for a lot of Americans, the notion that America stands for liberty and justice for everybody."
11. "Got on a plane in 'Frisco and got off in Vietnam I walked into a different world the past forever gone I could have gone to Canada or I could have stayed in school But I was brought up differently I couldn't break the rules..." Which group had their feet firmly on the ground when they told the tale of a young man who decided that serving was more honourable than running away, but ten years afterwards found himself "Still In Saigon"?

Answer: Charlie Daniels Band

"The ground at home was covered in snow
and I was covered in sweat
My younger brother calls me a killer
and my daddy calls me a vet

Everybody says I'm someone else
and I'm sick and there's no cure
Damned if I know who I am
where was only one place I was sure
When I was -
[Chorus]
Still in Saigon
Still in Saigon
I am still in Saigon
in my mind"

Born in 1936 in North Carolina, Charlie Daniels was noted for his country and rock songs. His biggest hit was "The Devil Went Down to Georgia", which topped the Country charts in 1979.
12. "I got a friend named Whiskey Sam He was my boonierat buddy for a year in Nam He said is my country just a little off track Took 'em twenty-five years to welcome me back But, it's better than not coming back at all Many a good man I saw fall And even now, every time I dream I hear the men and the monkeys in the jungle scream..." Which country singer noted for apparel of a noir hue wrote about the length of time it took some in America to become reconciled to those who served?

Answer: Johnny Cash

Johnny Cash, "The Man in Black" was born in Arkansas in 1932 and died in Nashville, Tennessee, in 2003.
He had several US country number ones including "There You Go" (1956); "Don't Take Your Guns to Town (1958); "Ring of Fire" (1963) and "A Boy Named Sue" (1968).
"Folsom Prison Blues" was a number one in 1968, and his concerts in Folsom and San Quentin prisons were career highlights.
13. "Here we are again my friends We're back in Vietnam Back in Vietnam We're back in Vietnam Back in Vietnam..." This was the chorus of a song that portrayed combatants in Vietnam as pirates. Which four-in-a-row Grammy winner wrote it?

Answer: Lenny Kravitz

"We are like pirates and we are comin' with the biggest ego
We're gonna bring it down and give it to you, that's how we go
We're gonna drop from the sky like a killer tornado".

Born in New York City in 1964, Kravitz covered most genres as a writer, performer and producer. He won four successive Grammys between 1999 and 2002.
"It Ain't Over 'til It's Over" was his top selling single in the US pop charts, in 1992, but he had several alternative and mainstream rock number 1s, including "Fly Away" in 1998.
"Back In Vietnam' was on the 2008 "It Is Time For A Love Revolution" album.
14. "In 1965 Vietnam seemed like just another foreign war but it wasn't It was different in many ways, as so were those that did the fighting In World War II the average age of the combat soldier was 26 In Vietnam he was 19..." Who was the English singer behind this UK chart-topping hit that (inaccurately) claimed the average age at which US soldiers in Vietnam died was 19?

Answer: Paul Hardcastle

The song was top of the UK charts for five weeks in 1985 and also reached the US top 20.
Letting the facts get in the way of a good story, the actual average age of US soldiers killed in Vietnam was 23. [Source: Southeast Asia Combat Area Casualties Current File (CACCF)].
Hardcastle was born in London in 1957 and was regarded as a keyboards virtuoso who had a number of dance chart hits, including "Sound Chaser" and "Rain Forest".
In 1989, he released "19" and it hit the top of the charts in ten countries. It peaked at number 15 in the US. This was a mixed sung/spoken narrative set over a dance beat.
Trivia note: Hardcastle was the composer of a number of UK TV themes, including 'Top of the Pops' and 'Holiday'.
(The three 'wrong' answers were all Scottish.)
15. Many of the songs that were written about the Vietnam War questioned, or even opposed, America's involvement. Which Okie from Muskogee took a contrary view when he sang: "I hear people talkin' bad, About the way we have to live here in this country, Harpin' on the wars we fight, An' gripin' 'bout the way things oughta be. An' I don't mind 'em switchin' sides, An' standin' up for things they believe in. When they're runnin' down my country, man, They're walkin' on the fightin' side of me."?

Answer: Merle Haggard

"I read about some squirrely guy,
Who claims, he just don't believe in fightin'.
An' I wonder just how long,
The rest of us can count on bein' free.
They love our milk an' honey,
But they preach about some other way of livin'.
When they're runnin' down my country, hoss,
They're walkin' on the fightin' side of me."

One of Haggard's most famous songs was called "Okie From Muskogee". ("I'm proud to be an Okie from Muskogee/A place where even squares can have a ball...").
Merle Haggard was born in California in 1937 and had an early life of crime that included spells in juvenile and adult correctional facilities.
He was 'discovered' singing along at a Lefty Frizzell concert and turned his life around and became a popular singer. Between the mid 1960s and mid 1980s. Haggard recorded 38 Country number one hits and received a catalogue of awards, including three Grammys.
Haggard's songs were often seen as mainstream and 'Establishment'-supporting. He was regarded in protest song circles as a right-winger, but even that arch leftie, Phil Ochs, admired him, including "Okie From Muskogee" in his live "Gunfight At Carnegie Hall" album.
Joan Baez, another darling of the left, covered Haggard's "Sing Me Back Home" and "Mama Tried".
Source: Author darksplash

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor agony before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
4/17/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us