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Quiz about Mini ManEaters
Quiz about Mini ManEaters

Mini Man-Eaters Trivia Quiz


Tiny parasites. They're eating you right now!

A multiple-choice quiz by quogequox. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
quogequox
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
197,325
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
3103
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
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Question 1 of 10
1. The humble flea, bane of the unclean pet, is the animal kingdom's long jumping champion. It is also responsible for approximately 200 million human deaths, more than all wars combined, due to it spreading which disease? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Sarcoptes scabiei lives its entire life on its human host, its lifecycle varying from between 10 and 17 days. The female digs burrows into the skin in which to lay eggs, eating the skin and fluid she excavates. When the mite's eggs hatch, the larvae clamber to the surface whereupon they dig themselves a burrow of their own in which to molt. An infestation of these mites is referred to as what? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. It is estimated that about 200 million people worldwide have these little fellows swimming about within the veins of the abdominal cavity. They can happily eat and mate for up to 20 years, producing hundreds of eggs every day. An estimated 1 million people a year die from complications attributed to Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma japonicum. What other name are these beasties known by? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. This little flea is not content with grabbing a quick bite and heading off. Oh no, it knows when it's onto a good thing; having found a meal it isn't about to give it up. Tunga penetrans burrows below the surface into cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues and isn't likely to leave without surgical assistance. What is the common name for this flea? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. It is estimated that around 25 percent of the world's population is infected with Ascaris lumbricoides. The parasite can live its entire life snuggled happily in our innards.
The adult dwells in the small intestine, where a female can produce a lazy 200,000 eggs per day. When the eggs hatch within the small intestine, the youngsters burrow into the circulatory system and swim their way to the lungs. From there they crawl up to the pharynx where they are swallowed and end up back where they started! What is Ascaris lumbricoides also known as?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Don't let the bedbugs bite. We've all heard that goodnight advice. What's wrong with letting bedbugs sip some of your blood while you're asleep? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. The body louse causes irritation and itching but does not transmit disease.


Question 8 of 10
8. Entamoeba histolytica to scientists, to us it's an amoeba which causes gastrointestinal complaints such as diarrhea and even dysentery. During the feeding stage of the amoeba's lifecycle they are known as a trophozoites. It is during this stage that the amoeba snacks on our innards. Specifically what do they feed on? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus are estimated to infect some 800 million people worldwide. The larvae of these creatures live in soil until they come into contact with a host. They then burrow through the skin, generally a bare foot, and make their way to the intestines. Living hooked firmly onto the small intestine of the host, these parasites feed on the host's blood. Severe infection can cause serious problems for the host, especially in infants and young children, due to blood loss alone. What are Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus also known as? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Fat, bloated ticks love nothing better than to bury their tiny heads into your skin and drink. The tick is infamous for spreading any of a number of diseases, including Lyme disease, encephalitis and Q-fever. Encephalitis is a viral disease; what causes Lyme disease? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
May 30 2024 : GoodwinPD: 10/10
Apr 24 2024 : debray2001: 6/10

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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The humble flea, bane of the unclean pet, is the animal kingdom's long jumping champion. It is also responsible for approximately 200 million human deaths, more than all wars combined, due to it spreading which disease?

Answer: Bubonic plague

Yep, highly specialized and designed by Mother Nature to take your blood and eat it! The flea crouches down low against its victim and uses its saw-like mouthparts to penetrate the skin. An anti-coagulant is placed into the open wound via the flea's saliva allowing for easier siphoning of the host's blood. The flea is from the Order Siphonaptera (notice the "siphon").
2. Sarcoptes scabiei lives its entire life on its human host, its lifecycle varying from between 10 and 17 days. The female digs burrows into the skin in which to lay eggs, eating the skin and fluid she excavates. When the mite's eggs hatch, the larvae clamber to the surface whereupon they dig themselves a burrow of their own in which to molt. An infestation of these mites is referred to as what?

Answer: Scabies

Untreated scabies may lead to enormous numbers of female mites. So many, in fact, that the honeycomb of burrows causes a condition known as "Norwegian" or "crusted" scabies. These advanced infections can be, not surprisingly, sources of local epidemics.
3. It is estimated that about 200 million people worldwide have these little fellows swimming about within the veins of the abdominal cavity. They can happily eat and mate for up to 20 years, producing hundreds of eggs every day. An estimated 1 million people a year die from complications attributed to Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma japonicum. What other name are these beasties known by?

Answer: Blood fluke

The blood fluke's eggs depart the human body via feces or urine. Of course first they must burrow through the walls of the small intestine or urinary bladder, causing internal bleeding. Some of the eggs may remain in the blood stream and find their way to the liver where the eggs are encapsulated in fibrous granuloma. Either way the conditions can lead to chronic disease and death.
Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma japonicum are the three species of blood flukes that infect the most humans. Infection occurs via contact with water contaminated with eggs.
4. This little flea is not content with grabbing a quick bite and heading off. Oh no, it knows when it's onto a good thing; having found a meal it isn't about to give it up. Tunga penetrans burrows below the surface into cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues and isn't likely to leave without surgical assistance. What is the common name for this flea?

Answer: Jigger

The jigger or chigoe flea is found throughout Central and South America as well as Africa and the Indian sub-continent.
5. It is estimated that around 25 percent of the world's population is infected with Ascaris lumbricoides. The parasite can live its entire life snuggled happily in our innards. The adult dwells in the small intestine, where a female can produce a lazy 200,000 eggs per day. When the eggs hatch within the small intestine, the youngsters burrow into the circulatory system and swim their way to the lungs. From there they crawl up to the pharynx where they are swallowed and end up back where they started! What is Ascaris lumbricoides also known as?

Answer: Intestinal roundworm

Roundworms can do all sorts of damage. The large size of the worm (females can grow to eighteen inches in length) can cause it to block the gastrointestinal tract or even the bile or pancreatic ducts, which may lead to potentially fatal peritonitis. The worms' migration through the lungs can also lead to hemorrhaging, and fluid buildup within the lungs can cause pneumonia.
And here's a nice story to finish with. Acaris doesn't take kindly to anesthetics and there have been numerous cases where the worms have decided to vacate their host during surgery via the nose and mouth. Nice.
6. Don't let the bedbugs bite. We've all heard that goodnight advice. What's wrong with letting bedbugs sip some of your blood while you're asleep?

Answer: They make you itch

The bedbug is a little critter that feeds exclusively on blood. Although the bedbug has many characteristics that make it a potential transmitter of disease, no known disease is in fact spread by it. Extensive bedbug bites may result in iron deficiencies due to blood loss.
7. The body louse causes irritation and itching but does not transmit disease.

Answer: False

Generally irritation and itchingis as bad as things get with the body louse, however the louse does transmit disease. Typhus, trench fever and relapsing fever can be spread via spirochetes and rickettsia from the lice. Epidemics can occur when unhygienic conditions and close contact with others occur, such as during wartime.
8. Entamoeba histolytica to scientists, to us it's an amoeba which causes gastrointestinal complaints such as diarrhea and even dysentery. During the feeding stage of the amoeba's lifecycle they are known as a trophozoites. It is during this stage that the amoeba snacks on our innards. Specifically what do they feed on?

Answer: Intestinal lining

Upon occasion, the trophozoites won't be satisfied with gnawing on intestine and will enter the circulatory system to venture off to infect other organs, generally the liver.
Penetration of the gastrointestinal tract by Entamoeba histolyica can result in potentially fatal peritonitis.
9. Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus are estimated to infect some 800 million people worldwide. The larvae of these creatures live in soil until they come into contact with a host. They then burrow through the skin, generally a bare foot, and make their way to the intestines. Living hooked firmly onto the small intestine of the host, these parasites feed on the host's blood. Severe infection can cause serious problems for the host, especially in infants and young children, due to blood loss alone. What are Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus also known as?

Answer: Hookworm

Ancylostoma duodenale is spread throughout Europe, Africa and Asia as well as parts of South America. Necator americanus was once common in the southeastern United States, but has been controlled since early in the twentieth century.
10. Fat, bloated ticks love nothing better than to bury their tiny heads into your skin and drink. The tick is infamous for spreading any of a number of diseases, including Lyme disease, encephalitis and Q-fever. Encephalitis is a viral disease; what causes Lyme disease?

Answer: Spirochaete bacterium

The first stage of Lyme disease includes symptoms such as fever, fatigue and headaches. A skin lesion resembling a bull's eye appears, generally at the site of the tick bite. Later stages of the disease have earned it the nickname "The Great Imitator" as symptoms resemble any one of a number of other diseases, including another spirochete-spread disease- syphilis.
Source: Author quogequox

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor crisw before going online.
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