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Quiz about More Educational Pub Signs
Quiz about More Educational Pub Signs

More Educational Pub Signs Trivia Quiz


For your enjoyment, I will show you ten more British pub signs, with some general knowledge questions inspired by them.

A photo quiz by stedman. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
stedman
Time
5 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
336,728
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
6790
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Bluebottle2 (9/10), Bluebottle2 (9/10), JSKYY56 (6/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. The pub sign "The White Hart" generally derives from the coat of arms of King Richard II. But which London football team plays its home games at White Hart Lane? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Pubs named the "Saracen's Head" can be found across England. The term was commonly used throughout Europe, during the Middle Ages and later, as a blanket term for all members of what religious group? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Pubs called the "Bear and Staff" (often more specifically a "Ragged Staff") usually take their names from the coat of arms of the Earls of Warwick. By what name is the fifteenth-century Duke of Warwick, Richard Neville, commonly known? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. The Tan Hill Inn is generally accepted to be, as this pub sign states, the highest pub in England. The route of which officially-designated Long Distance Pathway passes directly by the pub? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The "Spread Eagle" is another pub name that probably owes its origins to the eagle motif found on several heraldic coats of arms. In what of these sporting activities would you be most likely to see someone do a "spread eagle"? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Unsurprisingly, pubs named "The White Bear" usually feature a picture of a polar bear, as does this one in Stillington, Yorkshire. What was the name of Berlin Zoo's famous polar bear which sadly died in March 2011? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. What is the correct name for the variety of wide-brimmed ecclesiastical headgear shown on this sign outside a pub in Friar Street, Worcester? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Despite what you might assume, seeing the picture on this sign, a tontine is NOT a type of bridge. So what is it? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Britannia as a female symbol of Britain dates back to Roman times. She is traditionally depicted as armed with helmet, shield and trident, as in this pub sign for the "Britannia Inn" in Dungeness, Kent. Another artefact taking the name is the Britannia Bridge, which links which two parts of the United Kingdom? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. You might expect the sign for a pub with the name "The Mallard" to feature a breed of common green-headed duck. But the steam locomotive featured here does have its own particular claim to fame. What is it? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
May 09 2024 : Bluebottle2: 9/10
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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The pub sign "The White Hart" generally derives from the coat of arms of King Richard II. But which London football team plays its home games at White Hart Lane?

Answer: Tottenham Hotspur

The stadium doesn't actually stand on a street called "White Hart Lane" in Tottenham, but was built on ground obtained from the landlord of a local pub named "The White Hart" on the High Road. The land, owned by the Charrington brewery, had previously been used as a nursery (of the vegetable, not childcare, variety). Arsenal play at the Emirates Stadium, Chelsea at Stamford Bridge, and Charlton at The Valley.

The pub with this sign outside is in Pirbright, Surrey.
2. Pubs named the "Saracen's Head" can be found across England. The term was commonly used throughout Europe, during the Middle Ages and later, as a blanket term for all members of what religious group?

Answer: Muslims

The term "Saracen" originated as a Roman term specifically for the natives of Arabia. The term acquired its wider application to Muslims generally during the Crusades fought during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, in which Roman Catholic Europe attempted to recapture Jerusalem and the Holy Land from Muslim (or "Saracen") occupation. Nowadays, the word really only remains in current use in the context of pub names, and the Saracens Rugby Union Club based in St Albans.

The pub with this sign outside is in Diss, Norfolk.
3. Pubs called the "Bear and Staff" (often more specifically a "Ragged Staff") usually take their names from the coat of arms of the Earls of Warwick. By what name is the fifteenth-century Duke of Warwick, Richard Neville, commonly known?

Answer: Warwick the Kingmaker

During the fifteenth-century dynastic wrangling known as the "Wars of the Roses", Richard Neville became extremely powerful, with both the Lancastrian and Yorkist sides vying for his support. His shifting allegiance was instrumental in bringing both Henry VI and Edward IV to the throne, which earned him the sobriquet of "Warwick the Kingmaker".

In the present day, a number of organisations associated with the English county of Warwickshire have adopted the "Bear and Staff" motif, including Warwickshire County Council and the Warwickshire Constabulary. This particular sign, however, is outside a pub on Bear Street in London, on the corner of Charing Cross Road.
4. The Tan Hill Inn is generally accepted to be, as this pub sign states, the highest pub in England. The route of which officially-designated Long Distance Pathway passes directly by the pub?

Answer: The Pennine Way

The Pennine Way is a 267-mile long path between Edale in Derbyshire and Kirk Yetholm in the Scottish Borders. Most Pennine Way walkers stop for a drink at the Tan Hill Inn as they tramp past, although over-indulgence at lunchtime is not recommended if you need to navigate across the open moors in the afternoon.

It also does bed-and-breakfast and has space for camping, so is an ideal overnight stop in an otherwise bleak landscape.
5. The "Spread Eagle" is another pub name that probably owes its origins to the eagle motif found on several heraldic coats of arms. In what of these sporting activities would you be most likely to see someone do a "spread eagle"?

Answer: Figure skating

The "spread eagle" is an officially-designated figure-skating move. As the name suggests, it requires the skater to spread their arms and legs in the form of a diagonal cross. An exhausted marathon runner may finish his or her run spread-eagled flat on the ground, but not as an integral part of the activity!

The pub outside which this sign hangs is in Stokesley, Yorkshire.
6. Unsurprisingly, pubs named "The White Bear" usually feature a picture of a polar bear, as does this one in Stillington, Yorkshire. What was the name of Berlin Zoo's famous polar bear which sadly died in March 2011?

Answer: Knut

Knut was born in Berlin Zoo in 2006. When his mother rejected him at birth, the zoo made a decision that he should be hand-raised. Arguments between supporters of the zoo's decision and animal rights fanatics claiming that he should have been allowed to die ensured that Knut was famous even before he made his "public debut". He continued to be a popular attraction at the zoo until his premature death from drowning following a brain seizure.

For those old enough to remember, Pipaluk was a polar bear cub born at London Zoo in 1967. In his day, he was just as famous as Knut, and was a much-loved attraction until 1985, when he moved to a zoo in Poland following the closure of London Zoo's bear enclosure.
7. What is the correct name for the variety of wide-brimmed ecclesiastical headgear shown on this sign outside a pub in Friar Street, Worcester?

Answer: Galero

The galero was once a common form of headgear in the Roman Catholic Church, but is now more commonly seen as a heraldic emblem for members of the clergy. The coat of arms of a bishop will normally show a green galero with 12 tassels, while an archbishop will have 20. A cardinal will - as this picture shows - have a red hat with 30 red tassels, 15 on either side.
8. Despite what you might assume, seeing the picture on this sign, a tontine is NOT a type of bridge. So what is it?

Answer: A type of money-making scheme

A tontine is a scheme in which a group of people each contributes a sum of money to a central fund, which is usually then placed in some form of high-interest savings account. All of the money then goes to whichever of them is the last to die. The temptation for foul play offered by such schemes has inspired numerous fictional accounts of murder and skulduggery by members of tontines, all eager to be the last to survive and get the money. It is likely that a pub named the "Tontine Inn" would have been built with the profits from such a scheme.

The pub in this picture stands opposite the famous Iron Bridge in Shropshire, and has chosen to show this on the sign, perhaps because a tontine is a hard thing to illustrate!
9. Britannia as a female symbol of Britain dates back to Roman times. She is traditionally depicted as armed with helmet, shield and trident, as in this pub sign for the "Britannia Inn" in Dungeness, Kent. Another artefact taking the name is the Britannia Bridge, which links which two parts of the United Kingdom?

Answer: Wales and the Isle of Anglesey

The Britannia Bridge is one of two bridges linking Wales and Anglesey across the Menai Strait, the other being the Menai Bridge itself. The bridge linking Carrick Island with the Northern Irish mainland is a rope bridge for pedestrian use only. The bridge between Scotland and the Isle of Skye opened in 1995, replacing a ferry service.

There is no bridge between England and the Isle of Wight.
10. You might expect the sign for a pub with the name "The Mallard" to feature a breed of common green-headed duck. But the steam locomotive featured here does have its own particular claim to fame. What is it?

Answer: Holder of the official world speed record for steam locomotives

In July 1938, Mallard was officially recognised as reaching a speed of 125.88 miles per hour, on what was then the London and North Eastern Railway's (LNER) East Coast Main Line near Grantham in Lincolnshire. Mallard retired from service in 1963, and is now part of the collection at the UK's National Railway Museum in York.

This sign hangs outside the "Mallard Inn" in Worksop, Nottinghamshire.
Source: Author stedman

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Pagiedamon before going online.
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