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Quiz about Seneca Falls 1848 Women Demand their Rights
Quiz about Seneca Falls 1848 Women Demand their Rights

Seneca Falls 1848: Women Demand their Rights Quiz


The convention held at Seneca Falls, NY June 19-20, 1848 was often claimed to be the beginning of the modern women's rights movement in America. Here's a quiz, with some helpful hints.

A multiple-choice quiz by littlepup. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
littlepup
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
384,731
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
266
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
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Question 1 of 10
1. Elizabeth Cady Stanton helped organize the 1848 Seneca Falls convention, but she was the only organizer not a member of a particular religion. What was this religion so concerned with women's rights? They cared about slavery, too. Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Who was the only African-American person attending the 1848 Seneca Falls women's rights convention? Seems he was into everything, publishing a newspaper, writing an autobiography, speaking ... Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. The first session of the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention was advertised for women only, but about 40 men showed up, expecting to attend. What compromise was made? Revenge must have felt sweet, after Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Stanton were previously told they could attend but not speak at an anti-slavery meeting. Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. What document was the Declaration of Sentiments based on, at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention? The declaration was presented on the first day and it included a sentence beginning: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal..." Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The Declaration of Sentiments presented at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention included a list of grievances that the signers felt were forced on women by men. What was an example of one? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. The Declaration of Sentiments presented at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention included specific grievances that the writers felt men forced on women. What was another example of one of the grievances? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Once more, the Declaration of Sentiments presented at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention included a list of grievances that the signers felt were forced on women by men. What was another example of one from the list? This one encompassed many others, because even if careers were opened to women, they needed to feel they could succeed at them; if they were given the right to vote, they needed the belief they could participate in politics. Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. On the second day of the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, those present voted on the resolutions, and Frederick Douglass, a man, was finally allowed to give his opinion. What did he think of the controversial resolution saying women should seek the vote? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. The Declaration of Sentiments at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention ended, "We hope this Convention will be followed by a series of conventions embracing every part of the country." Did that come true? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Did any of the signers of the Declaration of Sentiments at the 1848 Seneca Falls convention live long enough to see women able to vote, or to vote themselves? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Elizabeth Cady Stanton helped organize the 1848 Seneca Falls convention, but she was the only organizer not a member of a particular religion. What was this religion so concerned with women's rights? They cared about slavery, too.

Answer: Quakers

Lucretia Mott of Philadelphia, a Quaker, was planning to be in Seneca Falls, and the meeting was planned around her visit, because she was known as a good orator -- something unusual for a woman in those days. The most radical Quakers, the Progressive Friends, gave women an equal voice with men, and even the less radical branches of the religion accepted women's influence more than most others.
2. Who was the only African-American person attending the 1848 Seneca Falls women's rights convention? Seems he was into everything, publishing a newspaper, writing an autobiography, speaking ...

Answer: Frederick Douglass

Douglass helped publicize the convention in his "North Star" newspaper, and was friends with many of the women, having been in anti-slavery societies or attended anti-slavery meetings with them. He especially encouraged women to enter the political sphere.
3. The first session of the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention was advertised for women only, but about 40 men showed up, expecting to attend. What compromise was made? Revenge must have felt sweet, after Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Stanton were previously told they could attend but not speak at an anti-slavery meeting.

Answer: the men were told they could attend but not speak or participate

Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton had gone to London for the World's Anti-Slavery Convention in 1840, assuming the motion to let women speak would be controversial but hoped it would pass. After a long debate, women were allowed to listen but not speak or vote. Stanton and Mott told the same thing to the men who assumed they would be welcomed at a women's convention. Men were welcome at the later sessions of the convention, as had always been promised, and nobody really minded the few mothers who brought their young boys along with their female children to the first session, but the adult women wanted to work out their Declaration of Sentiments themselves, on the first day.
4. What document was the Declaration of Sentiments based on, at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention? The declaration was presented on the first day and it included a sentence beginning: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal..."

Answer: the Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Sentiments began "When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one portion of the family of man ..." and was meant to be a parallel to the Declaration of Independence, a document that the women felt most Americans would agree with. By showing their grievances were similar and equally justified, they felt they could produce a document just as historic.
5. The Declaration of Sentiments presented at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention included a list of grievances that the signers felt were forced on women by men. What was an example of one?

Answer: women were prevented from following certain careers

Two of the grievances noted in the declaration applied to the subject of work and careers: "He [mankind in general] has monopolized nearly all the profitable employments, and from those she [womankind] is permitted to follow, she receives but a scanty remuneration," and the following one, "He closes against her all the avenues to wealth and distinction, which he considers most honorable to himself.

As a teacher of theology, medicine, or law, she is not known." Amelia Bloomer was at the convention and she along with some of the other women would indeed show their disdain for traditional female clothing by creating the more practical reform dress or "Bloomer costume" as it came to be known, but none of that was in the Declaration of Sentiments.
6. The Declaration of Sentiments presented at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention included specific grievances that the writers felt men forced on women. What was another example of one of the grievances?

Answer: men could get away with immoral behavior while condemning women for the same thing

The declaration included: "He [mankind] has created a false public sentiment by giving to the world a different code of morals for men and women, by which moral delinquencies which exclude women from society, are not only tolerated but deemed of little account in man." The underlying implication seemed to be that men could have mistresses on the side, but it's unclear if women wanted the right to have mistresses too or if they wanted the men to stop doing it. Either way, the point was clear: men should behave the same as women and be treated the same, for better or worse, not claiming that "boys will be boys" to justify their actions, while shaming women for the same thing. And of course other things applied, too: a man could go out for a night of drinking and gambling and be considered a jolly fellow, while a woman doing the same thing would be considered dissipated and shocking.
7. Once more, the Declaration of Sentiments presented at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention included a list of grievances that the signers felt were forced on women by men. What was another example of one from the list? This one encompassed many others, because even if careers were opened to women, they needed to feel they could succeed at them; if they were given the right to vote, they needed the belief they could participate in politics.

Answer: men took away women's confidence in themselves

The declaration included the complaint: "He [mankind] has endeavored, in every way that he could to destroy her [women's] confidence in her own powers, to lessen her self-respect, and to make her willing to lead a dependent and abject life." The idea of giving women confidence in their own abilities still resonates tday, as society struggles with how to get more female scientists, mathematicians or engineers.

Although Frederick Douglass was present, the issue of black women's rights didn't come up much. New York had some free blacks, but the women's rights movement at this time was mostly about whites. Black women's rights were framed as an anti-slavery issue, not an equality issue.

There was concern that if white women demanded black women be treated equally, it would hurt the cause of white women's rights among racist men (and women), and the concern continued long after the Civil War, when the Jim Crow era was strong.
8. On the second day of the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, those present voted on the resolutions, and Frederick Douglass, a man, was finally allowed to give his opinion. What did he think of the controversial resolution saying women should seek the vote?

Answer: he was strongly for it, and said if he could vote, women should vote

Frederick Douglass spoke briefly but eloquently about the importance of women voting, to secure further rights for themselves, and said that if he as a black man could vote, a white woman should be allowed to vote. His speech turned the tide in favor of the resolution, which passed despite some of the women's objections. One subject seemed to be glossed over: if women could vote, did that mean free black women would be allowed to vote also? The question never seemed to be asked directly and surely each person at the convention pictured the answer. New York had a property ownership requirement for black men but not white men, and had strongly voted to uphold it two years before.

Some other northern states allowed black men to vote the same as whites, while others didn't allow black men to vote at all. No state allowed women to vote, black or white.
9. The Declaration of Sentiments at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention ended, "We hope this Convention will be followed by a series of conventions embracing every part of the country." Did that come true?

Answer: yes, in the north at least; various meetings were held in different states over the next few years, and some laws were changed

Another convention was held in Rochester, NY two weeks later. Over the following two years, conventions were held in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana. The movement also gained successes in state legislatures, in the area of divorce and women's rights to money they brought into marriage or earned or inherited during a marriage.

The Civil War and the Constitutional Amendment freeing slaves both helped and hurt the movement. They ushered in an era where people were given rights they never had before, which should carry over into women getting rights also.

But the backlash and fear of Jim Crow laws made white women hesitant to include the equality of black women as one of their planks in their platform. Eventually, though, some western states granted the vote to women and finally women received the nationwide vote in 1919, a huge step forward in political equality. Social equality continued more slowly, surely at a pace that would have frustrated the women of 1848, but they wanted everything right then, a pace that even they realized was hopeful but impractical.
10. Did any of the signers of the Declaration of Sentiments at the 1848 Seneca Falls convention live long enough to see women able to vote, or to vote themselves?

Answer: yes, at least one voted

Rhoda Palmer (1816-1919) legally voted when her home state, New York, allowed women to vote in 1918. She was the only signer who actually got to vote. But it's complicated. Several western territories allowed women to vote while many of the attendees were still alive -- Wyoming in 1869, Utah in 1870 -- but none of the women were citizens of those territories (or states as they gained statehood), so they heard of women voting but could not vote. According to the National Park Service's website for the Women's Rights National Historical Park in New York, another signer, Charlotte Woodward Pierce (c.1830-1921) was ill on the first federal election day that women could vote in 1920, and she was home-bound with poor eyesight in 1921.

The NPS quotes her as saying "I'm too old. I'm afraid I'll never vote," and says she never did.
Source: Author littlepup

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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