Quiz about Orienteering Orientation
Quiz about Orienteering Orientation

Orienteering Orientation Trivia Quiz


The basics of land navigation using map and compass, appropriate for scouts or other beginning outdoor enthusiasts.

A multiple-choice quiz by wjames. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
wjames
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
386,018
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
290
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Magnetic compasses point to the north magnetic pole, but on most maps, "north" points to the geographic pole. What is the term for the angular difference between the magnetic and geographic pole at a particular spot on the Earth? Hint

Derivation
Declination
Deviation
Right Ascension

2. When using a magnetic compass, you should take care to keep it away from ferrous metal objects or electrical devices that produce a magnetic field. What is the term for the error caused by local magnetic fields acting on a compass? Hint

Deviation
Declension
Derogation
Malattraction

3. An orienteering compass has a (usually) rectangular base surrounding the compass itself. While the compass needle points to magnetic north, what is the large fixed arrow printed on the base of the compass called, the one you point towards your destination to get a bearing or keep on track? Hint

Headline
Direction of travel arrow
Lubber line
Leading mark

4. What units are compass courses measured in, that are marked around the circumference of the compass dial? Hint

Points
Radians
Mils
Degrees

5. To keep your orienteering compass handy for frequent measurements while walking or running, what is the most common way to attach the compass to yourself? Hint

Head strap
Wrist strap
Neck lanyard
Big safety pin

6. A special kind of map is used in orienteering, one that represents the three-dimensional earth surface on a two-dimensional piece of paper. What is this type of map? Hint

Gnomonic
Orthographic
Topographic
Geographic

7. Most maps use the traditional latitude and longitude to define locations on the map. Some maps, used for orienteering and other purposes, use another coordinate system abbreviated as UTM. What does UTM stand for? Hint

Unified Time Meridian
Universal Transport Medium
Universal Transverse Mercator
Ultrasonic Testing Machine

8. What is the procedure used to find your location by taking and plotting compass bearings to prominent objects marked on a topographic map? This word can also mean a surgical procedure. Hint

Redaction
Trepaning
Biopsy
Resection

9. Which U.S. government agency produces the land maps used in orienteering? Hint

Bureau of Land Management (BLM)
US Geological Survey (USGS)
Coast & Geodetic Survey (USC&GS)
National Geographical Society (NGS)

10. How do you measure distance traveled when orienteering, while walking or running the course? Hint

Distance scale on map
GPS
Pace count
Pedometer


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Magnetic compasses point to the north magnetic pole, but on most maps, "north" points to the geographic pole. What is the term for the angular difference between the magnetic and geographic pole at a particular spot on the Earth?

Answer: Declination

Declination is the term for this angular difference, although in some places, the bearing to the magnetic and geographic poles line up and the difference is zero. The north magnetic pole is located in northern Canada, while the geographic pole is where all the lines of longitude come together at 90 degrees north latitude.

The magnetic pole moves ever so slightly, causing small annual changes in the local declination.
2. When using a magnetic compass, you should take care to keep it away from ferrous metal objects or electrical devices that produce a magnetic field. What is the term for the error caused by local magnetic fields acting on a compass?

Answer: Deviation

A close-by magnetic field attracts the compass needle, which is itself magnetized, deviating it away from pointing at the earth's magnetic pole: this error is thus known as deviation. Ferrous metals - iron, steel - and electronics like wristwatches and the various "smart" devices are the usual causes of deviation when orienteering. Also beware of bolts, nails and the framework of any table you use to calculate your course before you hit the trail.
3. An orienteering compass has a (usually) rectangular base surrounding the compass itself. While the compass needle points to magnetic north, what is the large fixed arrow printed on the base of the compass called, the one you point towards your destination to get a bearing or keep on track?

Answer: Direction of travel arrow

The direction of travel (DoT) arrow is usually very prominent running down the center of the the base of an orienteering compass, parallel to the long edge of the base. You point the DoT arrow at an object, then rotate the compass to line "000" with the compass needle to read the magnetic bearing to the object.
4. What units are compass courses measured in, that are marked around the circumference of the compass dial?

Answer: Degrees

The compass dial is circular, so is best described as comprising 360 degrees. One of the first things you should do when you pick up your compass is determine how many degrees are indicated by each mark on the compass ring. Due to the small size of most compasses, the usual marking is every two degrees, with longer or bolder marks every 10 degrees. North is 0 degrees, East is 90, South is 180 and West is 270 degrees.
5. To keep your orienteering compass handy for frequent measurements while walking or running, what is the most common way to attach the compass to yourself?

Answer: Neck lanyard

The neck lanyard is the most common attachment, keeping the compass readily available and able to be raised to eye level to take a bearing or laid on a map to calculate a course. A wrist strap would work, but the compass couldn't be easily used with a map.

A safety pin would likely be made of steel and so would introduce deviation, and a compass on a head strap couldn't be read by the wearer.
6. A special kind of map is used in orienteering, one that represents the three-dimensional earth surface on a two-dimensional piece of paper. What is this type of map?

Answer: Topographic

Topographic maps show land elevation by using contour lines that represent an equal elevation above a reference, usually sea level. The elevation difference between contour lines is indicated on each map, and is one of the first things you need to determine when using one. Contour lines that are close together indicate a steeper area such as a cliff or prominent hill or ridge. Water courses are indicated by "v"-shaped contour lines with the "v" pointing upstream.
7. Most maps use the traditional latitude and longitude to define locations on the map. Some maps, used for orienteering and other purposes, use another coordinate system abbreviated as UTM. What does UTM stand for?

Answer: Universal Transverse Mercator

UTM, or Universal Transverse Mercator, divides the earth into 60 numbered zones of 6 degrees of longitude each, with lettered latitude bands defined in each zone to indicate grid squares. For instance, a location near Toronto, Canada would be in the "17T" grid zone. Positions within that grid are then defined with reference to a defined point in the grid, usually the central meridian.
8. What is the procedure used to find your location by taking and plotting compass bearings to prominent objects marked on a topographic map? This word can also mean a surgical procedure.

Answer: Resection

Intersection was used by early map makers who worked from a known point and took bearings to establish the position of a previously unknown object such as a mountain peak. The reverse of intersection is Resection. Objects on a topographic map are accurately plotted and you can use resection to take and plot bearings to two or more of them to establish your position if you get lost.
9. Which U.S. government agency produces the land maps used in orienteering?

Answer: US Geological Survey (USGS)

The US Geological Survey (USGS) is an agency of the U.S. Department of the Interior. The detailed 15- and 7.5 minute topographic map sheets show the natural and man-made features of the entire U.S. These maps can be purchased at outdoor outfitters or can be downloaded for free from their web site and printed at home.

The purchased maps are larger and easier to work with than those printed at home on standard sized paper.
10. How do you measure distance traveled when orienteering, while walking or running the course?

Answer: Pace count

An essential and basic preparation for orienteering is determining the average length of your pace, both walking and running. This is done by measuring how much distance you cover taking a certain number of steps, then dividing the distance by the number of steps. Your pace distance is different not only when walking and running, but on different types of terrain, so it's a good practice to check your pace length frequently.

When running an orienteering course, you first use your map and compass to determine the course and distance between waypoints. On the course, you use your compass to stay on course and count the number of paces you take to determine how far you've traveled.
Source: Author wjames

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
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