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Quiz about Overboard
Quiz about Overboard

Overboard! Trivia Quiz


My best friend approached me a while back and said, "Hey! We should go somewhere and do something!" I responded, "Okay!" So he asked, "What about SCUBA diving?" And here's what happened:

A multiple-choice quiz by reedy. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
reedy
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
345,919
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
667
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Before I get into my story, I have to admit that I always thought that SCUBA was a word, maybe named after some guy who invented it! I wasn't sure whether to believe my friend John when he told me that SCUBA is actually an acronym that stands for "Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Articles". Is he right?

Yes
No

2. My friend John and I decided that it would be a great idea to travel the world to experience all the best dive spots. We thought that we'd start out by seeing what other divers had to say on the subject. So, we looked up a SCUBA travel website that had a top ten list of diving sites around the world, based on reader voting. Decision made, we began planning out trip to see 'The Yongala'. Do you know what that is? Hint

A reef off the coast of Bali, Indonesia
An underwater cave off the coast of the Yucatan, Mexico
A sunken ruin off the coast of Yonaguni-jima, Japan
A shipwreck off the coast of Queensland, Australia

3. Having settled on our destination, we still faced a rather large obstacle before getting on the plane; we needed to learn how to SCUBA dive! I asked John to do the legwork and come up with some options for taking lessons. A little while later he presented a list of companies that could train us and certify us as SCUBA ready. Which of these was NOT on that list? Hint

USPA
NAUI
PADI
CMAS

4. John and I signed up for a beginner's SCUBA class called 'Open Water Diving' and proceeded to get a crash course in all the SCUBA basics. We learned about the equipment, about how buoyancy works, and about the effects that pressure has on our bodies as we go deep and also when we ascend from the deep. They said that if you come up from deep water too quickly, it's possible to suffer from something called 'decompression sickness', or 'diver's disease'. What's that other name for it, the one that starts with a 'b' and is just one word?

Answer: (One Word (starts with 'b'))
5. We finally got into the pool, and got to gear up with all the necessities for doing a basic dive. I was most concerned with making sure that I had all the pieces needed to be able to breathe! Which of these pieces is not part of the breathing apparatus? Hint

Open circuit regulator
Bailout bottle
Primary cylinder
Buoyancy compensator

6. After completing the classroom stuff and the basics in the pool (confined water dives), it was time for us to do our first open water dive. As we prepped our equipment, I asked our instructor if there would be a buoy of some kind to mark our diving area. He explained that the SMB (surface marker buoy) was typically only used during drift dives, night dives, misty conditions, or in disturbed sea conditions, although he was quick to say that there was no standardized rule. He then showed us the buoy. It was inflatable, and showed a flag when fully inflated. What did the flag look like? Hint

All white with a diagonal red stripe
All white with a diagonal blue stripe
All blue with a diagonal white stripe
All red with a diagonal white stripe

7. Our first open water dive! John and I went out with our instructor, and as we got ready to descend, we went through our buddy check. Satisfied we'd done it right, we inflated each other's BCD and then stood and jumped into the water from the boat's diving platform. Which of the four standard water entries was that? Hint

Wading entry method
Seated entry method
Giant-stride entry method
Back roll method

8. Once we got going, we dove down a ways, and I couldn't help but turn to John and give him a fist pump of victory at our awesome accomplishment! To my surprise, the instructor came swimming over and grabbed my SPG, looking at it in alarm. Then he looked at me with a puzzled look. What had I inadvertently signalled? Hint

That I was low on air
That I had lost a weight from my weight belt
That my buoyancy compensator was malfunctioning
That I was out of air

9. It took another couple of dives, but we finally passed our certification! After John and I shook our instructor's hand, we decided to go out for a bit on our own. We had some fun chasing the fish around, and examining some debris at the bottom of the lake, and then I was ready to go home. I signaled to John that I was ready to ascend. How did I do that? Hint

Hand and index finger pointed up
Open hand patting top of head
Open hand circling above head
Thumb up

10. Finally, SPRING BREAK! John and I headed off on our adventure to dive at 'The Yongala'. After a couple of days diving at the incredible site, we decided that we were ready to take on the another level of diving certification. Thinking of the possibility of caverns and under-ice diving, what course did we sign up for? Hint

Master SCUBA Diver
Advanced Open Water Diver
Divemaster
Rescue Diver


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Before I get into my story, I have to admit that I always thought that SCUBA was a word, maybe named after some guy who invented it! I wasn't sure whether to believe my friend John when he told me that SCUBA is actually an acronym that stands for "Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Articles". Is he right?

Answer: No

I found it interesting to learn that SCUBA (Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus) has been around for a very long time. Leonardo da Vinci actually designed a SCUBA-type system, with the intent of potential amphibious attacks on enemy ships. It had a bag-like mask that went around the head, along with two cane tubes that extended up to a cork diving bell that floated on the surface.

It was British engineer John Smeaton who invented the air pump that allowed for much greater depth of exploration. His invention in 1771 was followed closely by French inventor Sieur Freminet's rebreathing device, which made for the first self-contained system. It wasn't perfect, though. Freminet died of asphyxiation after 20 minutes on his invention.

Other inventors contributed better breathing systems over the years, namely William James in 1825 with his iron belt/copper helmet system that allowed for a seven minute dive, as well as Henry Fleuss in 1876 and his closed-circuit oxygen rebreather (he also died, this time from the toxic effect of pure oxygen under pressure), and Yves Leprieur in 1926 with his 2,000-psi steel tank.

The term SCUBA, however, didn't come into use until Dr. Christian Lambertsen designed a system by that name for the US military in 1939. The self-contained underwater breathing apparatus was what he called it, and the effort was code-named, appropriately enough, SCUBA.

In 1943, Jacques Cousteau and Emile Gagnan developed the 'demand regulator', which adjusted the air pressure as needed, and this led (with improvements) to their development of the 'Aqua-lung', which is the basis for modern SCUBA breathing equipment.
2. My friend John and I decided that it would be a great idea to travel the world to experience all the best dive spots. We thought that we'd start out by seeing what other divers had to say on the subject. So, we looked up a SCUBA travel website that had a top ten list of diving sites around the world, based on reader voting. Decision made, we began planning out trip to see 'The Yongala'. Do you know what that is?

Answer: A shipwreck off the coast of Queensland, Australia

The S.S. Yongala was a freight and passenger steamship on her 99th voyage bound for Cairns (Queensland) out of Melbourne (Victoria) when she encountered a cyclone and sank off Cape Bowling Green (Queensland). The date was March 23rd, 1911, and the entire crew and all passengers, 122 in all, perished. The wreck was not discovered until 47 years had passed. Two skindivers out of nearby Townsville, Don Macmillan and Noel Cook, followed up on previous reports of a potential wreck, and they brought up a safe that was proven to be from the Yongala. There was nothing in it but sludge.

Now a heritage site, the resting place of the S.S. Yongala is visited by over 10,000 divers a year, popular not only because of the largely intact 110-meter ship, but also because of the abundance of marine life to be seen.
3. Having settled on our destination, we still faced a rather large obstacle before getting on the plane; we needed to learn how to SCUBA dive! I asked John to do the legwork and come up with some options for taking lessons. A little while later he presented a list of companies that could train us and certify us as SCUBA ready. Which of these was NOT on that list?

Answer: USPA

I suppose that technically, the USPA *does* involve diving. Mind you, I don't think SKYdiving is quite the same thing. USPA stands for United States Parachute Association.

PADI (Professional Association of Diving Instructors), NAUI (National Association of Underwater Instructors), and CMAS (Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques) are each long-standing companies that provide excellent instruction towards the acquisition of a SCUBA diving certificate. CMAS (also known by the English 'World Underwater Federation') was founded in 1958, NAUI in 1959, and PADI in 1966.

Not to be overly partial, here is a list of further acronymical diving instruction companies that you could also check out: IANTD, NASE, PSAI, SSI, and UTD.
4. John and I signed up for a beginner's SCUBA class called 'Open Water Diving' and proceeded to get a crash course in all the SCUBA basics. We learned about the equipment, about how buoyancy works, and about the effects that pressure has on our bodies as we go deep and also when we ascend from the deep. They said that if you come up from deep water too quickly, it's possible to suffer from something called 'decompression sickness', or 'diver's disease'. What's that other name for it, the one that starts with a 'b' and is just one word?

Answer: Bends

According to the website decompressionsickness.org, the bends can be described as follows: "Due to the different pressures underwater, sometimes the diver breathes in gas that is from a higher pressure and this causes the nitrogen to be improperly absorbed by the bodily tissues. When the body does not safely absorb the nitrogen, it causes bubbles to form in the bodily tissues."

This can affect people differently, and some people not at all. When it does, it can be very uncomfortable, with sharp pains at the joints, sometimes itching and swelling, and if your brain becomes affected, it could cause amnesia, vision problems, or unconsciousness.

Treatment typically involves a compression chamber of some kind or having pure oxygen administered to you to combat the effects. Of course, the best treatment is proper preventive action - do not ascend faster than the bubbles you are expelling, and take the proper safety stops as you ascend from the depths to allow your body to adjust to the pressure changes.
5. We finally got into the pool, and got to gear up with all the necessities for doing a basic dive. I was most concerned with making sure that I had all the pieces needed to be able to breathe! Which of these pieces is not part of the breathing apparatus?

Answer: Buoyancy compensator

The primary cylinder is the diver's main air source while diving, while a bailout bottle is a smaller canister of air intended for emergency use in the event of the failure of the primary cylinder. The open circuit regulator works to regulate the pressurized air from the primary cylinder so that it matches the ambient pressure of the diving depth.

A rebreather is another type of regulator designed to combine exhaled air with an oxygen source. This type of breathing system (a CCUBA system - closed circuit underwater breathing apparatus) is smaller and lighter than the open circuit (standard) variety.

The buoyancy compensator (BCD) is not related to the breathing system, but rather is a device designed to help the diver control their up and down motion in the water. They typically come in the form of a vest with an inflatable bladder to allow the diver to raise or lower their buoyancy.
6. After completing the classroom stuff and the basics in the pool (confined water dives), it was time for us to do our first open water dive. As we prepped our equipment, I asked our instructor if there would be a buoy of some kind to mark our diving area. He explained that the SMB (surface marker buoy) was typically only used during drift dives, night dives, misty conditions, or in disturbed sea conditions, although he was quick to say that there was no standardized rule. He then showed us the buoy. It was inflatable, and showed a flag when fully inflated. What did the flag look like?

Answer: All red with a diagonal white stripe

Known as the SCUBA flag, or diver down flag, it indicates that there is a diver swimming (down below) in the area below where the flag is present. It is not the only flag used internationally, and another commonly used one is the maritime signal flag for Alfa, which signifies "I have a diver down; keep well clear at slow speed".

The red and white diver down flag was developed by Denzel James Dockery in 1949 after his discharge from the US Navy. At first, he tried to utilize the military's flagging system of a red flag, indicating a danger area where divers were working underwater, but the civilian world did not recognize it. Dockery (along with his wife Ruth) soon came up with the white stripe to mark it as a special flag (although the diagonal direction of the stripe came a little later). By 1957, it was in regular use by many divers.
7. Our first open water dive! John and I went out with our instructor, and as we got ready to descend, we went through our buddy check. Satisfied we'd done it right, we inflated each other's BCD and then stood and jumped into the water from the boat's diving platform. Which of the four standard water entries was that?

Answer: Giant-stride entry method

The giant-stride entry method is used when on a large boats where standing will not unduly upset the boat's equilibrium. You take a giant step off the edge of the boat (or dive platform, or dock) with one hand holding the regulator and mask in place, with the other hand securing the weight belt.

The wading entry method is used to wade in from the shore, walking backwards and shuffling the feet to avoid stepping on sharp rocks and to scare away marine life (and not step on them either).

The seated entry method is used when the water is too shallow to use the giant-stride entry method, and essentially has you begin by seating yourself on the edge of the boat or dive platform, then push off with your hands and lower yourself into the water. Care must be taken to ensure that your air tank does not catch on the side of the boat.

The back roll method is the preferred choice for smaller boats where a standing entry would be untenable. This time you seat yourself with your back to the water and do a backwards somersault, while securing your regulator and face mask with one hand.
8. Once we got going, we dove down a ways, and I couldn't help but turn to John and give him a fist pump of victory at our awesome accomplishment! To my surprise, the instructor came swimming over and grabbed my SPG, looking at it in alarm. Then he looked at me with a puzzled look. What had I inadvertently signalled?

Answer: That I was low on air

Making a fist can mean one of two things, depending on how it is shown. If you make a fist, then point to a part of your anatomy, you are indicating that you have a cramp at the indicated site. If you make a fist in front of your chest in a circular motion, it means that your SPG (submersible pressure gauge) is showing 50 bars - meaning that it has reached the reserve level.

The signal for no air is typically a flat hand in a sawing motion across the throat.
9. It took another couple of dives, but we finally passed our certification! After John and I shook our instructor's hand, we decided to go out for a bit on our own. We had some fun chasing the fish around, and examining some debris at the bottom of the lake, and then I was ready to go home. I signaled to John that I was ready to ascend. How did I do that?

Answer: Thumb up

There are many different hand signals utilized to communicate underwater, and as long as you and your buddy are on the same page with what you're using, they will be effective. A number of websites will inform you of the different signals that can be used, although if you have taken, or decide to take, a SCUBA course, that information will have been included.
10. Finally, SPRING BREAK! John and I headed off on our adventure to dive at 'The Yongala'. After a couple of days diving at the incredible site, we decided that we were ready to take on the another level of diving certification. Thinking of the possibility of caverns and under-ice diving, what course did we sign up for?

Answer: Advanced Open Water Diver

All of the course listed are specifically taken from the PADI course offerings, but other SCUBA certification companies offer a similar range of qualification levels. The Advanced Open Water Dive course focuses on underwater navigation, deep water diving (18-30 m / 60-100 ft) and three options of adventure diving (such as caverns, ice diving, wrecks, or underwater digital photography).

The other three courses listed are MORE advanced diving courses, for the experienced diver wanting to master his or her skills.
Source: Author reedy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
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