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Quiz about You Say Aluminum I Say Aluminium
Quiz about You Say Aluminum I Say Aluminium

You Say 'Aluminum', I Say 'Aluminium' Quiz


Let's call the whole thing off... Ahem. There are some notable differences in spelling for some words between the American and British vocabulary. Think you can spell well? Come on in and find out. There's a UK bias, but don't let that put you off. ;)

A multiple-choice quiz by eburge. Estimated time: 7 mins.
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Author
eburge
Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
339,144
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
5227
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Johnmcmanners (10/10), Gispepfu (6/10), xxFruitcakexx (8/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. If you've been really naughty, then you'll get sent to jail. But, if you're British, how might you spell 'jail'?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 2 of 10
2. "Waiter! Oh, waiter! I'll have the check, please!" Such a phrase is common in American restaurant parlance, but, believe it or not, the British spell 'check' differently. Think you know how to spell it?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 3 of 10
3. Bling, bling, that's some sweet jewelry you've got. Yes, it's jewelry for our American friends, but we British add a couple of extra letters in our spelling. Can you spell it?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 4 of 10
4. Who can forget Homer Simpson's memorable snow-moving song: "Mr. Plow, that's my name. That name again is Mr. Plow!" Of course, being American, Mr. Simpson spells it 'plow', but how would a Briton spell it?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 5 of 10
5. "Brr, it's cold in here. Is there a draft? Yes, yes there is. It's coming underneath the door. Quick, grab that draft excluder before I freeze." A common scenario in many households, I'm sure, but how might this 'draft' be spelled by the British?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 6 of 10
6. While many have made the switch to digital, there are those who still use analog. Of course, being British, we have to complicate it by having too many letters than are necessary for correct pronunciation. So what would the British spelling of 'analog' be?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 7 of 10
7. "Okay, when you're ready, proceed onwards, making sure to perform the mirror-signal-maneuver routine." My driving instructor's words echo through my head constantly. If an American spells it 'maneuver', how does a Briton spell it? Watch out for those sneaky vowels.

Answer: (One Word)
Question 8 of 10
8. "Ahead, just pull over on the left, not too close to the curb." Yet another piece of great advice from my driving lesson days. It's 'curb' in America, but in Britain, it's...?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 9 of 10
9. Courage. Boldness. Bravery. Valor. Three of these four words are spelled the same in both lexicons, but it's the last one that differs. Only by one letter, though! How would 'valor' be spelled in Britannia?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 10 of 10
10. Let's end on a sweet note. For my American pals, how about a coffee and a donut? For my British brethren and... sisterthren, how about a coffee and a... oh, how do you spell that?

Answer: (One Word)

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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. If you've been really naughty, then you'll get sent to jail. But, if you're British, how might you spell 'jail'?

Answer: gaol

'Gaol' is used in British to refer to a medieval prison. If not for tradition, this spelling would have died out after the Middle Ages.

I have to admit, I thought 'gaol' was an antiquated spelling of the word 'jail' until recently. In some respects, it is, although I haven't seen many instances where the word 'gaol' has been written down.
And you will go there if you've been naughty. Very naughty.
2. "Waiter! Oh, waiter! I'll have the check, please!" Such a phrase is common in American restaurant parlance, but, believe it or not, the British spell 'check' differently. Think you know how to spell it?

Answer: cheque

While the British may ask for the bill, rather than the cheque, it nevertheless is the variant of 'check'. Similarly, the British may wave a chequered flag, whereas the Americans would have a checkered flag.
3. Bling, bling, that's some sweet jewelry you've got. Yes, it's jewelry for our American friends, but we British add a couple of extra letters in our spelling. Can you spell it?

Answer: jewellery

Both 'jewellery' and 'jewelry' are pronounced the same in both dictionaries, despite the difference in the number of syllables. Canada uses both spellings, but more often than not, you'll find it spelled 'jewellery'.

Despite being a member of it myself, I apologise for my use of the words 'bling, bling' in my efforts to appeal to the younger demographic. I'd much rather say, "Oh, what a lovely piece of jewellery you have there."
4. Who can forget Homer Simpson's memorable snow-moving song: "Mr. Plow, that's my name. That name again is Mr. Plow!" Of course, being American, Mr. Simpson spells it 'plow', but how would a Briton spell it?

Answer: plough

While the US may predominantly use 'plow', their Canadian neighbours use both spellings. Plowing snow, ploughing a field...it's all the same, although in rare cases in the US when 'plough' is used, it usually refers to a horse-drawn device, with 'plow' indicating a powered machine.
5. "Brr, it's cold in here. Is there a draft? Yes, yes there is. It's coming underneath the door. Quick, grab that draft excluder before I freeze." A common scenario in many households, I'm sure, but how might this 'draft' be spelled by the British?

Answer: draught

'Draught' is used in British to refer to a gust of wind and the game draughts (called checkers in America), among others. 'Draft' is used as a verb, for instance, to draft a document.

I must say, those draught excluders are very useful for keeping out the cold winds that howl underneath doors and freeze many a lounge. That is, until a cat decides to claw it up and the little beads inside suddenly fly everywhere. They still turn up now and again under various pieces of furniture, a constant reminder that it's probably best to use a towel next time.
6. While many have made the switch to digital, there are those who still use analog. Of course, being British, we have to complicate it by having too many letters than are necessary for correct pronunciation. So what would the British spelling of 'analog' be?

Answer: analogue

Words ending in -ogue and -og are chiefly Greek in origin. American spellings of these words tend to favour the -og ending, and vice versa. Analogue is sometimes used in American English when used as a noun, but when used as an adjective, the -og ending prevails.

Confession time! Until I was about 12, I actually thought the big hand on the clock told the hour, and the little hand the minute. When I was told that was wrong, I remember only wearing digital watches from then on to save embarrassment. But you'll be happy to know, I can now tell the time properly on an analogue clock.
7. "Okay, when you're ready, proceed onwards, making sure to perform the mirror-signal-maneuver routine." My driving instructor's words echo through my head constantly. If an American spells it 'maneuver', how does a Briton spell it? Watch out for those sneaky vowels.

Answer: manoeuvre

British English favours 'oe' instead of just 'e' in words like 'oesophagus' and 'foetal', and an 're' ending as opposed to an 'er' ('metre', 'centre', 'theatre', etc). Thus, the American 'maneuver' gets the 'oe' in the middle and the 're' at the end to make the British 'manoeuvre'.

The important thing to know about the mirror-signal-manoeuvre routine is that you first check the mirrors for any nearby traffic, then indicate and move off. It also helps to be in first gear and not reverse. I missed the car behind me by a hair's breadth. Thankfully, I'm not as clumsy anymore.
8. "Ahead, just pull over on the left, not too close to the curb." Yet another piece of great advice from my driving lesson days. It's 'curb' in America, but in Britain, it's...?

Answer: kerb

When referring to the side of a road, then the 'kerb'/'curb' difference applies. However, when using the word as a synonym of 'restrain', then it is 'curb' in both lexicons.

You'll be happy to know I successfully pulled up next to the kerb. Although there was some debate as to what the instructor meant by close. Apparently, if the passenger door opens and the bottom of it scrapes along the pavement, you're too close. I learnt that the hard way.
9. Courage. Boldness. Bravery. Valor. Three of these four words are spelled the same in both lexicons, but it's the last one that differs. Only by one letter, though! How would 'valor' be spelled in Britannia?

Answer: valour

The majority of words in the British dictionary that end in -our end in -or in the American dictionary. The pronunciation still stays the same, no matter the spelling.

Even though I know it's pronounced 'valor', that little voice in my head always says 'val-hour' when I see the British spelling. Anyone else? No? Just me, then.
10. Let's end on a sweet note. For my American pals, how about a coffee and a donut? For my British brethren and... sisterthren, how about a coffee and a... oh, how do you spell that?

Answer: doughnut

Americans will use both spellings of the word, though 'donut' is seen more commonly. In British English, 'doughnut' will prevail, and 'donut' will be indicated as the American variant.

The doughnut was a staple item in my school lunchbox. Sandwich, piece of fruit, packet of crisps, muesli bar, doughnut. And always the type that's covered in delicious cinnamon. Mmmm, cinnamon.
Source: Author eburge

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor looney_tunes before going online.
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