FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Blue Plaques Were Not Just Londoners
Quiz about Blue Plaques Were Not Just Londoners

Blue Plaques: We're Not Just Londoners Quiz


English Heritage expanded its official Blue Plaque scheme in 1998 to cover Liverpool & Merseyside, Southampton, Birmingham & Portsmouth. The Blue Plaques in these areas invite you to identify the famous people they commemorate.

A multiple-choice quiz by rossian. Estimated time: 4 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. People Trivia
  6. »
  7. U.K. People
  8. »
  9. England

Author
rossian
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
343,967
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
1155
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: gracious1 (6/10), gibbysgab (2/10), bradez (8/10).
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. Just so you know what you're looking at, I'm a Blue Plaque in Portsmouth marking the house where which author and 1907 Nobel Prize winner lived as a boy? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. I am the Blue Plaque at 13 Beach Lawn, Liverpool marking the home of Thomas Henry Ismay. I hope you don't get a sinking feeling when I ask you which of these shipping lines he acquired in 1868? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. I'm the Blue Plaque gracing the building at 42 Hamilton Square, Birkenhead, which is one of the trading places of Sir Henry Tate. Can you be a sweetie, and tell me how he made his money? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. If you're looking at me, you must be visiting 1 Cranbury Place, Southampton, as I'm the Blue Plaque marking the birthplace of John Jellicoe. Can you do some navel gazing to work out with which World War I battle he is associated? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. I'm not on a dairy, and I don't want to milk it, but I'm the Blue Plaque on 32 George Road in Edgbaston, Birmingham. I commemorate the place where which of these men lived between 1872 and 1881? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. There's no need to get into a dogfight or spit fire at me, because I'm only a Blue Plaque at 2 Russell Place, Portswood, Southampton. Which aircraft designer lived here between 1927 and 1937? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This could be called a strange meeting place, but I'm a Blue Plaque on 7 Elm Grove, Birkenhead, where war poet Wilfred Owen lived from 1900 until 1903. Which of these poems did he write? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. I'm not a dinky Blue Plaque, so I hope you'll be on the right track to work out that I'm marking the home of which inventor and toy manufacturer from Liverpool? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Why are you calling me a goon and suggesting I should be pink? I'm the Blue Plaque which you can find on 96 Castle Road, Southsea, Portsmouth to mark the birthplace of which actor and comedian? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Imagine that you are outside 251 Menlove Avenue in Liverpool. You will be able to see me, because I am the Blue Plaque marking the boyhood home of which singer? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
May 30 2024 : gracious1: 6/10
May 30 2024 : gibbysgab: 2/10
May 29 2024 : bradez: 8/10
May 24 2024 : Trish192: 8/10
May 24 2024 : StaysUpLate: 7/10
May 24 2024 : tmc61: 6/10
May 24 2024 : sandysenior: 8/10
May 24 2024 : robbonz: 9/10
May 24 2024 : spidersfull: 10/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Just so you know what you're looking at, I'm a Blue Plaque in Portsmouth marking the house where which author and 1907 Nobel Prize winner lived as a boy?

Answer: Rudyard Kipling

Kipling was born in Bombay (now Mumbai) in 1865 and was sent to England at the age of five, with his three-year-old sister. They lived as boarders with Captain and Mrs Holloway at Lorne Lodge, Campbell Road, Southsea, Portsmouth for six years, and it is this house which bears the Blue Plaque. Kipling was extremely unhappy during his time there, which he described in his autobiography as a mixture of cruelty and neglect and 'calculated torture'.

He did go on to say that it might have formed the basis of his ability to create stories since he learned to tell lies to avoid punishment. Kipling received the Nobel Prize for Literature, becoming the first writer in the English language to be awarded the honour. Among his works are the 'Just So Stories' and 'The Jungle Book'.
2. I am the Blue Plaque at 13 Beach Lawn, Liverpool marking the home of Thomas Henry Ismay. I hope you don't get a sinking feeling when I ask you which of these shipping lines he acquired in 1868?

Answer: White Star

Thomas Ismay was apprenticed at the age of sixteen to Imrie and Tomlinson, a Liverpool based firm of shipbrokers. He purchased the name, flag and goodwill of the White Star Line in 1868, as the original company had gone into bankruptcy. He established the agreement with Harland and Wolff in Belfast that they should build all of the ships for the White Star Line.

The most famous ship belonging to the line was 'Titanic', which was ordered in 1908 and sank in 1912. By this time Thomas Ismay had died (in 1899) and management of the White Star Line had passed to his son, J. Bruce Ismay, who controversially survived the 'Titanic' sinking.
3. I'm the Blue Plaque gracing the building at 42 Hamilton Square, Birkenhead, which is one of the trading places of Sir Henry Tate. Can you be a sweetie, and tell me how he made his money?

Answer: Sugar

Tate began his working life at the age of thirteen as an apprentice to a grocer in Liverpool. After serving for seven years, he was able to set up in business himself and the property in Birkenhead was his first shop (between 1851 and 1861). Having acquired the patent for making sugar cubes, Tate's fortune grew rapidly.

He was a philanthropist and made generous and regular charitable contributions. The Tate art galleries in London, Liverpool and St. Ives in Cornwall all bear his name in recognition of his generosity in donating both money and works of art.
4. If you're looking at me, you must be visiting 1 Cranbury Place, Southampton, as I'm the Blue Plaque marking the birthplace of John Jellicoe. Can you do some navel gazing to work out with which World War I battle he is associated?

Answer: Jutland

Although all these battles took place during the World War I, only Jutland was fought at sea and thus was a naval battle (sorry for the bad clue). The Battle of Jutland took place in 1916 in the waters near the Jutland peninsula in Denmark. It was the only major sea battle of the war and was inconclusive with neither Britain nor Germany being able to claim a decisive victory. Jellicoe was in overall command of the British Grand Fleet and has been criticised for not pressing home the advantage initially gained.

He was appointed as First Sea Lord in November 1916, but lost the position at the end of 1917, with his pessimistic and negative views leading to the loss of his role. He was created an Earl in 1925, becoming the 1st Earl Jellicoe.
5. I'm not on a dairy, and I don't want to milk it, but I'm the Blue Plaque on 32 George Road in Edgbaston, Birmingham. I commemorate the place where which of these men lived between 1872 and 1881?

Answer: George Cadbury

The Cadbury company was founded by John Cadbury, father of George and Richard, who were the sons who took over the business. Richard is also commemorated with a Blue Plaque on his home at 17 Wheeley's Road, Edgaston, Birmingham. The Cadbury family were Quakers, and their interest in chocolate was originally prompted by their wish to provide an alternative drink to alcohol.

The Cadbury brothers acquired a site in south Birmingham where they built a factory and housing for their workers. This became known as Bourneville and both the factory and housing still exist. Among Cadbury's products are the chocolate bar named 'Dairy Milk'. Fry and Rowntree were also founders of chocolate companies, and Quakers, in Bristol and York respectively. John Mackintosh was a confectioner in Halifax, Yorkshire.
6. There's no need to get into a dogfight or spit fire at me, because I'm only a Blue Plaque at 2 Russell Place, Portswood, Southampton. Which aircraft designer lived here between 1927 and 1937?

Answer: R J Mitchell

Reginald Joseph Mitchell was born in 1895 in Staffordshire and moved to Southampton in 1917 to become an aircraft designer for the Supermarine Aviation Company. He was responsible for the design of over twenty aircraft, including several flying boats and racing aircraft to compete in the Schneider Trophy competitions. Mitchell is mainly remembered for the design work on the Spitfire, which played a major role in the Battle of Britain. Sadly, he died from cancer in 1937 at the age of only forty-two. Southampton also boasts a Blue Plaque on 38 Chessel Avenue, Bitterne to mark the fact that Roy Chadwick lived there from 1922 until 1929.

He was the designer of the Lancaster and Vulcan bombers, built by Avro, so the designers of two of the most important World War II aircraft both lived in Southampton at the same time, although only briefly.

The other people named are all well known aircraft designers.
7. This could be called a strange meeting place, but I'm a Blue Plaque on 7 Elm Grove, Birkenhead, where war poet Wilfred Owen lived from 1900 until 1903. Which of these poems did he write?

Answer: Dulce et Decorum Est

Wilfred Owen was born in Oswestry, Shropshire, but his family moved to Birkenhead in 1897 following the death of his grandfather, which forced them to leave the property in which they had been living. He served as a Second Lieutenant in the Manchester Regiment during World War I and met Siegfried Sassoon when both of them were being treated for 'shell shock' in Edinburgh. Sassoon encouraged Owen's poetry writing, and Owen went on to produce some of the most powerful poems to come out of the war. He was killed just one week before the end of the war. Among his poems are 'Strange Meeting', 'Anthem for Doomed Youth' and 'Futility' as well as 'Dulce et Decorum Est'. 'The Soldier' was written by Rupert Brooke and 'How to Die' by Siegfried Sassoon. Julian Grenfell wrote 'Into Battle'.
8. I'm not a dinky Blue Plaque, so I hope you'll be on the right track to work out that I'm marking the home of which inventor and toy manufacturer from Liverpool?

Answer: Frank Hornby

The plaque is on The Hollies, 32 Station Road, Maghull, Liverpool which is where Frank Hornby lived. He was responsible for inventing the construction toy which he called 'Mechanics Made Easy' but which was renamed and registered using the trade mark Meccano. Meccano Ltd was set up in 1908 and and has continued in existence ever since. Hornby also invented model railways, originally as part of the Meccano operation but later manufactured by a separate company bearing his name.

He also began the production of die-cast miniature vehicles which were called Dinky Toys. Philip Ullmann set up Mettoy, who produced the Corgi range of die-cast vehicles, and James Galt founded the toy company bearing his name. Hans Beck was German, and the inventor behind Playmobil.
9. Why are you calling me a goon and suggesting I should be pink? I'm the Blue Plaque which you can find on 96 Castle Road, Southsea, Portsmouth to mark the birthplace of which actor and comedian?

Answer: Peter Sellers

Peter Sellers was born in Southsea in 1925 and came to public attention in The Goon Show on BBC radio. He was particularly good at adopting different accents, and his Goon Show characters included Major Bloodnok and Bluebottle. Sellers began his film career in British made comedies, including 'The Ladykillers'(1955) and 'I'm All Right Jack' (1959).

He then moved into Hollywood films, with 'Dr. Strangelove' (1964) in which he played several roles. He is probably best remembered for his role of Inspector Clouseau in several of the 'Pink Panther' movies. Dudley Moore died in 2002 and has not been dead for the required twenty years to qualify for a plaque and Rowan Atkinson is still alive. Hancock was born in Birmingham.
10. Imagine that you are outside 251 Menlove Avenue in Liverpool. You will be able to see me, because I am the Blue Plaque marking the boyhood home of which singer?

Answer: John Lennon

The house is called 'Mendips' and is where John Lennon lived with his Aunt Mimi from the age of five until mid 1963. It was bought by John's widow, Yoko Ono, who donated it to the National Trust. The property has now been returned to a 1950s style and was opened to the public in 2003. Among John's many compositions was 'Imagine', lines from which appear at Liverpool's airport which has been named in his honour. Before qualifying for an English Heritage Blue Plaque, the person honoured must have been dead for twenty years so George Harrison, who died in 2001, cannot qualify till 2021 at the earliest.

Although Billy Fury died in 1983 the hospital where he was born has been demolished, so there is no Blue Plaque for him although there is a statue of him by the Albert Dock in Liverpool. Michael Holliday was probably not considered to be famous enough for the scheme.
Source: Author rossian

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series UK People Quizzes:

Various quizzes about people from or associated with the United Kingdom.

  1. Don't I Know You? Average
  2. Deride and Prejudice Average
  3. Will Work for Chocolate Average
  4. Blue Plaques: We're Not Just Londoners Average
  5. From Britain to Hollywood Easier
  6. Parliamentary, My Dear Watson Average
  7. That Snow Leopard! Average
  8. Water, Water Everywhere Average
  9. Zed People Easier
  10. The Bells are Ringing Average
  11. Iconic British Females Average
  12. Born in Gloucestershire Easier

Also part of quiz list
6/18/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us