Quiz about The Answer Is Always James
Quiz about The Answer Is Always James

The Answer Is Always James Trivia Quiz


It is true that all of the answers in this quiz are James. However, all of the answer choices are also James. Match the proper King James of Scotland with each description.

A matching quiz by bernie73. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
bernie73
Time
5 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
404,070
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
8 / 15
Plays
133
Mobile instructions: Press on an answer on the right. Then, press on the gray box it matches on the left.
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. Perhaps unfairly associated with the "Black Dinner"  
James VI
2. "The Wisest Fool in Christendom"  
James II
3. Held hostage in England for 18 years  
James V
4. Last Catholic monarch of Scotland  
James V
5. Died not long after the Battle of Solway Moss  
James VI
6. The Orkney Islands and Shetland Islands become part of Scotland  
James VIII
7. First to be named "Defender of the Faith"  
James I
8. Jamestown, Virginia, was named for him  
James II
9. Assassinated at Blackfriars Monastery  
James III
10. Succeeded on the throne by Mary, Queen of Scots  
James III
11. Killed at the Battle of Sauchieburn  
James VII
12. Married into the Tudor family  
James VII
13. Became King of Scotland as an adult  
James IV
14. His birth would lead to his father losing the throne of Scotland  
James IV
15. Had the nickname "Fiery Face"  
James I






Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Perhaps unfairly associated with the "Black Dinner"

Answer: James II

The "Black Dinner" took place in 1440, and involved the murder of William, 6th Earl of Douglas, and his younger brother. The invitation to dinner had been issued in the name of King James II. The ten-year king, however, was not involved in the murder, apart from pleading that the lives of two brothers be spared.

There is some uncertainty who planned the murder, but Lord Chancellor Sir William Crichton and James, 7th Earl of Douglas, are the most probable suspects.
2. "The Wisest Fool in Christendom"

Answer: James VI

James (1566-1625) was both James VI of Scotland (1567-1625) and James I of England (1603-1625). A scholar and writer, James authored several books including "The True Law of Free Monarchies" (1698) and sponsored the King James Bible. The phrase "wisest fool in Christendom" reflected traditional criticism of James as an ineffective ruler, though more recent scholarship argues that he was a relatively successful king.
3. Held hostage in England for 18 years

Answer: James I

James I (1394-1437) became King in 1406, though his coronation was not celebrated until 1424. The youngest son of King Robert III, James was being transported to France in 1406 for his safety when his ship was captured by English pirates who turned him over to King Henry IV of England.

His father died shortly after his capture. His treatment varied greatly over the years. At times James was held prisoner in the Tower of London. At other times, he served the English monarchy in wartime.
4. Last Catholic monarch of Scotland

Answer: James VII

James VII was the only openly Catholic monarch of Scotland since Mary Queen of Scots, apart from Charles II (the brother of James) who converted to Catholicism on his literal deathbed. When it was thought that the successor of James would be one of his two adult daughters (both safely Protestant), the people of England were more willing to accept a few years of rule by a Catholic king.

The birth of a son to the second wife of James, who would be raised as a Catholic, would lead to rebellion against James.
5. Died not long after the Battle of Solway Moss

Answer: James V

James V (1512-1542) would spend the majority of his life as the King of Scotland, succeeding to the throne in September 1513. The father of James V, James IV, had been killed at the Battle of Flodden when the Scottish army was fighting against the English army.

In 1542, the Scottish army would suffer a defeat from the English army at the Battle of Solway Moss. James died less than a month later--perhaps of a fever--while he was at Falkland Palace.
6. The Orkney Islands and Shetland Islands become part of Scotland

Answer: James III

Margaret of Denmark (1456-1486) brought the Shetland Islands and Orkney Islands as a dowry when she wed James III (1451/2-1488) in 1469. Perhaps it is appropriate that Margaret was not overly fond of her husband, as James was not a popular monarch during his reign (1460-1488). James was seen as unfair in his rule and was, in fact, imprisoned by some nobles briefly in 1482.
7. First to be named "Defender of the Faith"

Answer: James IV

James IV (1473-1513) was named "Protector and Defender of the Christian Faith" by the Papal Legate to Scotland, Robert Bellenden, in 1507, on behalf of Pope Julius II. This occurred at a ceremony of Holyrood Abbey. The awarding of this title to James predates his brother-in-law, Henry VII of England, by 14 years. Previously, James had felt guilt over his role in overthrowing his father, the previous king, and performed penance by the wearing of a cilice or sackcloth.
8. Jamestown, Virginia, was named for him

Answer: James VI

Jamestown, founded in 1607 and located in what is now Virginia, is considered the first long-term English settlement in mainland North America. The colony was founded and sponsored by the London Company, which received a royal charter from James VI in 1606.

Interestingly, though settlers at or near Jamestown found tobacco to be a popular cash crop, James VI was very critical of tobacco, even writing a book to express his criticisms.
9. Assassinated at Blackfriars Monastery

Answer: James I

With his relatively harsh method of ruling, James had no shortage of enemies. While staying at the Blackfriars Monastery in Perth, in April 1437, King James and his wife, Queen Joan, found themselves separated from many of their servants one evening. With a few moments to make a plan, James attempted to hide in a sewer tunnel from the killers--about 30 in number.

He was trapped there and murdered.
10. Succeeded on the throne by Mary, Queen of Scots

Answer: James V

James was married twice: first briefly to Madeline of France and later to Mary of Guise. James and Mary had three children--two sons who died in infancy and Mary, Queen of Scots. At the time of the death of James, Mary was only six days old. When near death, James is thought to have said "it came wi a lass, it'll gang wi a lass" (it began with a girl, it will end with a girl).
11. Killed at the Battle of Sauchieburn

Answer: James III

By the late 1480s, many Scottish nobles were again in rebellion against James III. This time, they claimed his son--the future James IV--as a leader, even if only as a figurehead. James was killed at the battle, though it is unclear whether he died while fighting in the battle or while trying to flee from the battle. James is buried at Cambuskenneth Abbey along with his wife, Margaret.
12. Married into the Tudor family

Answer: James IV

James IV was King of Scotland from 1488 until 1513. In 1503, he married Margaret Tudor, sister of King Henry VIII of England (1509-1547). Though James and Margaret had six children, only one, a son (the future James V), would live to see his second birthday. The death of James IV at the Battle of Flodden would lead to James V becoming king before his second birthday.
13. Became King of Scotland as an adult

Answer: James VII

Though there were seven ruling kings and one king in pretence for Scotland, James VII (1633-1701) was the only one who ascended to the throne as an adult. James became King of England and Scotland in 1685 at the age of 54. The other monarchs became king between the ages of one and fifteen.

The reign of James would be relatively brief, lasting less than four years (1685-1688). Although Parliament would declare that James abdicated the throne when he fled England during the Glorious Revolution, James felt that he never gave up the throne.
14. His birth would lead to his father losing the throne of Scotland

Answer: James VIII

James VIII (1688-1766), known as the Old Pretender, would claim the throne of England/Great Britain, but never control it. The birth of James Francis Edward Stuart (James VIII) would lead to his father, James VII, losing control of England and Scotland.

Many people in England were uncomfortable with the idea of a Catholic dynasty (represented by James VII and James VIII) ruling England. Had James ruled Scotland from his father's death to his own (1701-1766) he would have the longest reign of any ruler of Scotland before Queen Elizabeth II.
15. Had the nickname "Fiery Face"

Answer: James II

James II (1430-1460) was the King of Scotland from 1437 until his death. His nickname of "Fiery Face" came from a conspicuous reddish birthmark on his face. At the time, many thought it was a outward sign of a hot temperament. Nonetheless, he was a successful and popular monarch. His untimely death came from an injury received from an a piece of a cannon that broke while being fired.
Source: Author bernie73

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