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Quiz about Writers Homes
Quiz about Writers Homes

Writers' Homes Trivia Quiz


Match the writer to his or her home. These houses have all had some literary impact upon the writer.

A matching quiz by Joepetz. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
Joepetz
Time
4 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
386,563
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Very Easy
Avg Score
9 / 10
Plays
1629
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 86 (6/10), cardsfan_027 (10/10), slay01 (10/10).
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. 6 Gateway Drive in Great Neck, New York, in a wealthy neighborhood known for lavish parties.  
  Daphne du Maurier
2. Rowan Oak in Oxford, Mississippi where visitors can read an outline of "A Fable" which the author wrote on the wall.  
  William Faulkner
3. Menabilly in Cornwall, England, whose name is similar to the estate in the author's 1938 one-word titled novel.   
  Agatha Christie
4. Monk's House in East Sussex, England near the Ouse River where the author wrote many classics in peace.  
  Virginia Woolf
5. Sunnyside in Tarrytown, New York, ironically named since the author's work about a headless horseman is not sunny.  
  F. Scott Fitzgerald
6. Greenway Estate in Devon, England, which served as the inspiration for Nasse House in "Dead Man's Folly".  
  Robert Frost
7. The Mount in Lenox, Massachusetts, which may be haunted and could be a "House of Mirth".  
  Louisa May Alcott
8. Stone House in South Shaftsbury, Vermont, it may be at the end of "the road less traveled by".  
  Anne Frank
9. Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts, which is the inspiration for the setting of "Little Women".  
  Edith Wharton
10. The Secret Annex in Amsterdam where the author lived with several other people before being discovered in 1944.  
  Washington Irving





Select each answer

1. 6 Gateway Drive in Great Neck, New York, in a wealthy neighborhood known for lavish parties.
2. Rowan Oak in Oxford, Mississippi where visitors can read an outline of "A Fable" which the author wrote on the wall.
3. Menabilly in Cornwall, England, whose name is similar to the estate in the author's 1938 one-word titled novel.
4. Monk's House in East Sussex, England near the Ouse River where the author wrote many classics in peace.
5. Sunnyside in Tarrytown, New York, ironically named since the author's work about a headless horseman is not sunny.
6. Greenway Estate in Devon, England, which served as the inspiration for Nasse House in "Dead Man's Folly".
7. The Mount in Lenox, Massachusetts, which may be haunted and could be a "House of Mirth".
8. Stone House in South Shaftsbury, Vermont, it may be at the end of "the road less traveled by".
9. Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts, which is the inspiration for the setting of "Little Women".
10. The Secret Annex in Amsterdam where the author lived with several other people before being discovered in 1944.

Most Recent Scores
Jun 16 2024 : Guest 86: 6/10
Jun 13 2024 : cardsfan_027: 10/10
May 25 2024 : slay01: 10/10
May 13 2024 : Mazee1: 10/10
May 08 2024 : PurpleComet: 10/10
May 04 2024 : polly656: 10/10
Apr 24 2024 : Guest 207: 6/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. 6 Gateway Drive in Great Neck, New York, in a wealthy neighborhood known for lavish parties.

Answer: F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda lived here for two years starting in 1922. The opulence of the house and the neighborhood served as influences for Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby". Fitzgerald wrote the novel's first three chapters here before he and Zelda moved to Paris in 1924.
2. Rowan Oak in Oxford, Mississippi where visitors can read an outline of "A Fable" which the author wrote on the wall.

Answer: William Faulkner

In Faulkner's study, visitors can view and read an outline of "A Fable" which he wrote on the wallpaper when he was planning it out. That novel won Faulkner a Pulitzer Prize in 1954. Rowan Oak is known also for the many plant species that live on the grounds, though the Rowan Oak of the house's name is not a real plant.
3. Menabilly in Cornwall, England, whose name is similar to the estate in the author's 1938 one-word titled novel.

Answer: Daphne du Maurier

Menabilly was the inspiration for Manderley, the fictional estate in "Rebecca". The description of Manderley in the novel fits Menabilly perfectly. Both were large estates that could not be seen from the road as they were hidden by forests and woods. Du Maurier did not live in Menabilly when she wrote "Rebecca" but lived nearby.

She did, however, lease the manor for a few years after "Rebecca" was published.
4. Monk's House in East Sussex, England near the Ouse River where the author wrote many classics in peace.

Answer: Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf wrote some of her most famous novels at Monk's House, including "To The Lighthouse" and "Mrs. Dalloway". Woolf had lived in London mostly but she had always found the solitude of Monk's House to be more suitable for writing, especially during World War II. Virginia Woold drowned herself in the River Ouse which ran near Monk's House in March 1941 after a battle with depression.
5. Sunnyside in Tarrytown, New York, ironically named since the author's work about a headless horseman is not sunny.

Answer: Washington Irving

Irving wrote a short story called "Wolfert's Roost" about Sunnyside, though the name of that story is similar to his previous home's called Wolfert's Nest. Irving designed Sunnyside himself and hoped it would remind visitors of the Mediterranean. During Irving's lifetime, the house was well known by name, akin to that of Mount Vernon, George Washington's plantation.

Irving's classic "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is gloomy and dark in tone. As a result, many readers may find it odd he lived in a house called Sunnyside.
6. Greenway Estate in Devon, England, which served as the inspiration for Nasse House in "Dead Man's Folly".

Answer: Agatha Christie

The "Poirot" series adaptation of "Dead Man's Folly" was actually filmed at Greenway Estate. In that novel, a murder hunt at a fair goes awry when the teenager playing the victim is actually murdered and the hostess disappears. Greenway Estate or parts of it, where also used as inspiration in several other Christie novels.

Christie and her second husband, Max Mallowan, bought Greenway Estate in 1938 and lived their until they died, she in 1976 and he two years later. Christie's daughter, Rosalind Hicks, also lived in the house until she died in 2004.
7. The Mount in Lenox, Massachusetts, which may be haunted and could be a "House of Mirth".

Answer: Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton wrote a few paranormal or ghost stories during her career because she was inspired by the ghostly visions she claimed to see at the Mount. Although she lived there at the time, the Mount is not known to be an inspiration for "The House of Mirth" though Wharton did write "The Decoration of Houses" when she was decorating the Mount.
8. Stone House in South Shaftsbury, Vermont, it may be at the end of "the road less traveled by".

Answer: Robert Frost

Stone House was poet Robert Frost's house where he wrote such classics as "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening". Stone House is a picturesque little red house that embodies that classic Vermont/New England feeling with bright leaves in the fall and snowy banks in the winter. Visitors can also see some of Frost's famous apple trees on the grounds.
9. Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts, which is the inspiration for the setting of "Little Women".

Answer: Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott lives in Orchard House for decades prior to the publishing of "Little Women". She and her husband had actually once sold it to Nathaniel Hawthorne but they bought it back in 1857. According to Alcott, she wrote "Little Women" in the house on a desk her father built. The desk can still be seen in the house today, which is a museum.
10. The Secret Annex in Amsterdam where the author lived with several other people before being discovered in 1944.

Answer: Anne Frank

Anne Frank wrote her famous diary, which was published in 1952 in English with the name "The Diary of a Young Girl," during the Holocaust when she and her family were hiding in what she called the Secret Annex of their home. The Franks were Jewish and went into hiding to avoid capture by Nazis. Anne Frank had always wanted to be a writer and detailed her life in hiding in a journal she had received for her birthday. Anne Frank House is now a well-visited museum in Amsterdam.
Source: Author Joepetz

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