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Quiz about An Introduction to Brazilian JiuJitsu
Quiz about An Introduction to Brazilian JiuJitsu

An Introduction to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Quiz


Brazilian jiu-jitsu is an offshoot of traditional Kodokan Judo that focuses particularly on ground fighting that has become widely used in mixed martial arts. This is a quick look at some of the history, practices, and people involved.

A multiple-choice quiz by agentofchaos. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
agentofchaos
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
403,702
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
282
Last 3 plays: Guest 69 (6/10), 1231231212321 (6/10), Guest 31 (6/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. In the early years, the terms "judo" and "jiu-jitsu" (also spelled jujutsu) tended to be used interchangeably, and the sport became best known by the latter name in Brazil while in Japan, the term judo eventually became preferred. Although Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu was developed by a number of people, the main originators are usually considered to be the Gracie brothers who developed it in the 1920s after being trained by what Japanese judo master? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Royce Gracie, a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioner who was the son of Hélio Gracie and grandson of Carlos Gracie, was the inaugural winner in 1993 of which famous mixed martial arts competition that was created to identify the most effective martial art in a contest with minimal rules and no weight classes? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. In Brazilian jiu-jitsu practice, sparring with other students is known as what? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Brazilian jiu-jitsu places greater emphasis on ground fighting than many other martial arts and there are several major ground fighting positions. What is it called when one combatant has their back to the ground while attempting to control the other combatant using their legs? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Brazilian jiu-jitsu makes effective use of a number of chokehold techniques derived from judo. What is it called when a fighter encircles an opponent's neck and one of their arms with their legs to press the opponent's arm against their own neck, strangling them? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Although Brazilian jiu-jitsu practitioners aim to gain a dominant position over their opponent during grappling, it is also important to know how to escape an opponent's hold if they are currently in a dominant position. One common escape technique involves keeping one's elbows close to one's body and one's hands close together while attempting to roll away from one's opponent, which is known by what crustacean inspired name? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Like judo and several other Asian martial arts, Brazilian jiu-jitsu organizations use a system of ranked colored belts to indicate a practitioner's level of proficiency, with experts being awarded black belts. Extremely high-level practitioners who have made a significant contribution to the sport may be awarded a special red-and-black belt that is commonly known by what name, after a poisonous reptile? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Legendary martial artist and film star Chuck Norris, among his many other achievements, has a black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.


Question 9 of 10
9. Rafael "Barata" de Freitas, a notable black belt from Brazil trained by Carlos Gracie Junior, developed a novel submission technique he calls the "baratoplata," which involves what? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Although Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu has long been predominantly practiced by men, women have increasingly become involved in the sport. In 1990, who became the first woman to achieve a black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In the early years, the terms "judo" and "jiu-jitsu" (also spelled jujutsu) tended to be used interchangeably, and the sport became best known by the latter name in Brazil while in Japan, the term judo eventually became preferred. Although Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu was developed by a number of people, the main originators are usually considered to be the Gracie brothers who developed it in the 1920s after being trained by what Japanese judo master?

Answer: Mitsuyo Maeda

Mitsuyo Maeda was a 7th dan black belt in judo who travelled widely, teaching judo in a number of countries before settling in Brazil in 1914. He was also a successful prize-fighter and mixed martial artist who participated in no holds barred competitions, frequently challenged practitioners of other arts and sports. In Brazil, he trained Carlos Gracie, who passed on his knowledge to his brothers Oswaldo, Gastão Jr., George, and Hélio Gracie. The Gracie brothers adapted what they learned into their own style that placed more emphasis on ground fighting rather than throwing as Hélio found the throws difficult to master because of his smaller size and the greater strength required by throwing.

Kano Jigoro was the founder of Kodokan Judo and ran the school in which Mitsuyo Maeda trained. Tomita Tsunejiro was the earliest disciple of judo and personally trained Maeda. Bruce Lee, of course, was a practitioner of kung fu, not judo.
2. Royce Gracie, a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioner who was the son of Hélio Gracie and grandson of Carlos Gracie, was the inaugural winner in 1993 of which famous mixed martial arts competition that was created to identify the most effective martial art in a contest with minimal rules and no weight classes?

Answer: Ultimate Fighting Championship

The first ever Ultimate Fighting Championship event, which was later to be known as UFC1, was held at the McNichols Sports Arena in Denver, Colorado, on November 12, 1993. The concept was that it would feature martial artists from different disciplines such as boxing, kickboxing, sambo, wrestling, Muay Thai, karate, taekwondo, and of course Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, facing each other in no-holds-barred combat to determine which style was most effective. This first tournament had no weight classes, rounds, or judges. Methods of winning were knockout, tapout (submission by a fighter), or corner stoppage (a fighter refuses to continue, also known as "throwing in the towel"). There were only three rules: no biting, no eye gouging, and no groin shots. Wearing gloves was optional. There were eight contenders who progressed through three rounds in a knockout style tournament where only winners of each bout would progress to the next round, until the final bout between two fighters. Royce Gracie won the final bout by defeating savate and karate practitioner Gerard Gordeau using his ground fighting skills and successfully choking him into submission. Gracie's win was particularly notable as he was able to defeat opponents who were larger and stronger than himself. Gracie went on to win two other Ultimate Fighting Championship events, namely UFC2 and UFC4, and played a large role in popularizing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu among mixed martial artists.

Although the Ultimate Fighting Championship continued holding fights in the original "no hold barred" format for several years, the company eventually came under pressure from the US government and sporting authorities to require more restrictions on what techniques fighters could use to reduce the violence of the sport. Additionally, weight classes and time limits for combat rounds were later introduced.

Global Fighting Championship, Cage Fury Fighting Championship, and Maximum Fighting Championship are the name of other organizations that have promoted mixed martial arts.
3. In Brazilian jiu-jitsu practice, sparring with other students is known as what?

Answer: Rolling

During rolling, students practice grappling with each other to test and improve their skills. This is done on special mats. Students may practice particular techniques such as joint locks and chokeholds or focus on other skills such as practicing defence from specific situations or submissions. If a student is caught in a submission hold, they may tap on their opponent's body to submit; if unable to touch their opponent, they may yell "tap, tap, tap."
4. Brazilian jiu-jitsu places greater emphasis on ground fighting than many other martial arts and there are several major ground fighting positions. What is it called when one combatant has their back to the ground while attempting to control the other combatant using their legs?

Answer: Guard

There are several variations of the guard position that allow one to attack with various joint locks and chokeholds. For example, transitioning directly from standing to the guard position is known as pulling guard. Once on the ground, there are various ways to apply the guard position depending on the situation. The combatant who does not have their back to the ground may attempt to "pass the guard," that is, assume the guard position themselves to gain a more dominant position, or they may attempt to strike their opponent from above if their hands are free.

Side control, full mount, and back mount are different grappling techniques that are not performed with one's back on the ground.
5. Brazilian jiu-jitsu makes effective use of a number of chokehold techniques derived from judo. What is it called when a fighter encircles an opponent's neck and one of their arms with their legs to press the opponent's arm against their own neck, strangling them?

Answer: Triangle choke

The triangle choke, also known as the figure 4 choke (a rough translation of the Japanese judo term "sankaku-jime"), is typically performed from a lying position with one's back to the ground. More advanced practitioners may apply it from other positions, even by taking a flying leap from a standing position for those who are very daring! Although commonly referred to as a chokehold, some people use the term choking to refer strictly to cutting off a person's air supply, whereas this technique is technically strangulation as it involves putting pressure on the carotid arteries of the neck to block blood flow to the brain rather than blocking the airway. The technique works by using one leg to put pressure directly on one side of the opponent's neck and using the other leg to press their arm to the other side of their neck. The legs therefore form a triangular shape, hence the name.

Rear naked, anaconda, and north-south choke are all real names of other distinctive kinds of choking techniques.
6. Although Brazilian jiu-jitsu practitioners aim to gain a dominant position over their opponent during grappling, it is also important to know how to escape an opponent's hold if they are currently in a dominant position. One common escape technique involves keeping one's elbows close to one's body and one's hands close together while attempting to roll away from one's opponent, which is known by what crustacean inspired name?

Answer: Shrimping

This defensive technique, which is also known as the "elbow escape" and "hip escape," is so-named because one aims to curl one's body into a shape that looks somewhat like a shrimp. This technique is particularly used when one's opponent is attempting to gain control through a back mount, in which they are grappling on the ground from behind from a position atop oneself. The elbows are kept close to the body to prevent the opponent from trying to pin one's arms, while the hands are held high and close together with the chin tucked in to protect one from being strangled. The aim is to create space between oneself and one's opponent and use one's arms to break free of their grip while attempting to roll one's back onto the ground so that the opponent can no longer attack from behind. Once one's back is to the ground, a number of grappling counterattacks become possible.

Lobstering, seahorsing, and spidering are just words that I made up!
7. Like judo and several other Asian martial arts, Brazilian jiu-jitsu organizations use a system of ranked colored belts to indicate a practitioner's level of proficiency, with experts being awarded black belts. Extremely high-level practitioners who have made a significant contribution to the sport may be awarded a special red-and-black belt that is commonly known by what name, after a poisonous reptile?

Answer: Coral

Beginning practitioners wear a white belt, then typically advance through blue, purple, brown, and finally black belt, although some organizations may have their own variations and a different color scheme may be used for children practitioners. Modern Brazilian jiu-jitsu organizations recognize nine different black belt levels, similar to the "dan" system used in judo.

Individuals who reach the seventh level receive an alternating red-and-black belt that is referred to as a coral belt, after the coral snake, which has black and red markings, presumably because they are considered to be as deadly as this animal. Eighth level practitioners receive an alternating red-and-white belt, also called a coral belt. Practitioners who reach the seventh and eight levels are entitled to be referred to as "master," while the very few individuals who advance to ninth level receive a red belt and the title of "grandmaster." These highly advanced levels, which require decades to achieve, not only recognize an individual's experience but their impact on Brazilian jiu-jitsu in the wider world.

The pioneers of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, including the Gracie brothers, Carlos, Oswaldo, George, Gaston, and Helio, were recognized as tenth level black belts, but there are no living practitioners at this level, which is no longer conferred.
8. Legendary martial artist and film star Chuck Norris, among his many other achievements, has a black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

Answer: True

Norris has black belts in several styles of martial arts and became a third degree black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in 2015. He first learned Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in the 1980s from Carlos Machado, a former world master's champion who is a relative of the Gracie brothers and who trained under them. Norris has been instrumental in promoting Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in the United States and helped bring over several members of the Gracie and Machado families to teach the sport.
9. Rafael "Barata" de Freitas, a notable black belt from Brazil trained by Carlos Gracie Junior, developed a novel submission technique he calls the "baratoplata," which involves what?

Answer: Shoulder lock

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu includes a number of submission techniques that include the suffix "plata," starting with "omoplata" (Portuguese for scapula), a kind of armlock, as well as the "gogoplata," a type of chokehold that utilizes the shin bone ("gogo" is Portuguese for adam's apple), and the "monoplata," a type of shoulder lock. Rafael de Freitas is known by the nickname "Barata," Portuguese for "cockroach," a name which he claims was given to him as a young soccer player because of his quickness and frenetic pace. Accordingly, when he developed a novel kind of shoulder lock, he named it the "baratoplata." The technique is based on isolating the shoulder joint via immobilizing the elbow.

The user traps the opponent's elbow between their legs and threads one of their arms behind the opponent's elbow, while grasping their own thigh.

When successful this produces a painful hold that is difficult to escape.
10. Although Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu has long been predominantly practiced by men, women have increasingly become involved in the sport. In 1990, who became the first woman to achieve a black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu?

Answer: Yvone Duarte

Yvone Duarte was born in 1963 in Rio de Janeiro. She began training in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in 1978, being at first coached by her older brother Pascoal Duarte, who would later go on to earn a coral belt (7th degree black belt). She was instrumental in encouraging the Rio de Janeiro federation to open a female division, which held the first competition with a female category in 1985, which she won. Duarte was also the first woman to start her own team in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in the 1980s. She was awarded a first degree black belt in 1990 by her master Osvaldo Alves. In January 2020, she was awarded a 6th degree black belt by the International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federation, becoming the first woman to attain this grade and therefore the highest ranked woman in the world at the time. (Another woman, Patricia Lage, was awarded this grade in April the same year.)

Mackenzie Dern, Rikako Yuasa, and Tammi Musumeci are also prominent practitioners who have reached the black belt level.
Source: Author agentofchaos

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