Quiz about Have Fun or Aisle be Upset
Quiz about Have Fun or Aisle be Upset

Have Fun or Aisle be Upset Trivia Quiz


This quiz looks at ten different wedding traditions throughout the world. How many do you know?

A multiple-choice quiz by Creedy. Estimated time: 4 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. World Trivia
  6. »
  7. Cultures

Author
Creedy
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
389,510
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
547
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 159 (0/10), Guest 207 (8/10), BarbaraMcI (8/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. In which traditional wedding ceremony does the groom step on an empty glass? Hint

Jewish
Indian
Fijian
Swedish

2. In which religion is polygyny permissible, though seldom carried out in practice? Hint

Catholic
Presbyterian
Methodist
Islam

3. In which traditional Asian wedding does the bride hope to meet a gold chicken on the way to the ceremony? Hint

Polynesian
Greek
Russian
Chinese

4. A handfasting ceremony was a legal contract between a couple prior to an official church wedding one month later - in which country of monarchs? Hint

England
New Zealand
Ireland
Australia

5. In a Korean wedding, what does the expression "sokdowebaan" ("speeding over the limit") signify? Hint

They have run out of rice
The husband left the bride at the altar
The bride has disappeared
Pregnancy preceded the marriage

6. In Japan, what is the comical term applied to an unintended pregnancy before a wedding? Hint

A family disgrace
Oops we did it marriage
Eyebrows
Tsk tsk tsk

7. Is it true that a forced marriage in olden times in England was once known as a knobstick wedding?

Yes
No

8. For which security reason were bridesmaids dressed in identical outfits as their brides in feudal China? Hint

To stop photographers
To attract husbands of their own
To confuse kidnappers
To confuse the parents

9. In which western religion were premarital relations a perfectly normal part of life until parliament legislated against it in 1753? Hint

Hinduism
Mormon
Anglican
Buddhist

10. The Marriage Act of 1836 legalised which form of marriage in England and Wales? Hint

Multiple marriages
Same gender marriage
Marriage between divorced couples
Civil marriages


(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In which traditional wedding ceremony does the groom step on an empty glass?

Answer: Jewish

A traditional Jewish wedding sees the couple being married under a canopy of some kind to symbolise their new home together as husband and wife, but before that begins, they both sign a marriage contract to formally state the husband's obligations to his wife, and the process to follow should a divorce occur. That of course originated long ago in the times where the wife was a home maker, and the husband brought home the income. Following a variety of blessings and vows, the couple then sip from a glass of wine together, after which the groom crushes the glass with his right foot.

This symbolises the destruction and loss of Jerusalem's second Holy Temple which was destroyed by the Romans, circa 70 CE.
2. In which religion is polygyny permissible, though seldom carried out in practice?

Answer: Islam

A Muslim couple must always marry publicly and never in secret. The actual ceremony itself varies from culture to culture throughout the Muslim world. Apart from the romantic side of acting as each other's comforter and protector and the belief that they are meant for each other, a Muslim wedding is also viewed as a legal contract between the couple. Neither couple can be forced or tricked into marriage, and although polygyny is allowed under the practice of Islam - with definite restrictions in place - the vast majority of Muslims in our modern world do not practice this. One wife is enough for any man to handle it would seem, a thought that is just a tiny bit amusing.
3. In which traditional Asian wedding does the bride hope to meet a gold chicken on the way to the ceremony?

Answer: Chinese

In a traditional Chinese marriage ceremony, the bride is escorted to her wedding by a "Good Luck Woman" who carries a red umbrella over the bride's head. This woman is chosen on the grounds that her own marriage was a fruitful and happy one, and this is seen as a good omen for the young couple entering into married life.

The family and friends of the bride also scatter seeds and beans in front of the bride as she makes her way to the ceremony. If these attract a gold chicken along the way, this is considered to be an extra good omen for the marriage.
4. A handfasting ceremony was a legal contract between a couple prior to an official church wedding one month later - in which country of monarchs?

Answer: England

An English handfasting was not actually a wedding ceremony at all as many believe, but was looked on more as a type of engagement period before the union of a couple became permanent in a follow up church wedding. In pagan ceremonies this period lasted for a year and a day and was also called a handfasting, but in normal English society the handfasting only lasted for a month before the wedding.

This ceremony existed from the 12th to the 17th century in England, and it was considered legally binding, only to be dissolved on the death of either partner.

It was also known as a troth-plight. Part of the ritual of such a ceremony consisted of wrapping a red ribbon around the joined hands of the couple and tying it with a knot. This is where we get the expression "to tie the knot" today when referring to a wedding.
5. In a Korean wedding, what does the expression "sokdowebaan" ("speeding over the limit") signify?

Answer: Pregnancy preceded the marriage

The English spelling for this Korean expression is "Sokdowebaan". It translates to "speeding over the limit" and refers to a bride's pregnancy preceding her marriage. Korea's nearby neighbour, China, refers to conception preceding a wedding as "Married by order of the child" ("Fengzichengun").

This suggests that the marriage was approved by imperial edict. Because the increasing percentage of pre-wedding pregnancies is on the rise in that nation - and is somewhat frowned upon - the hint of official approval gives it an acceptable quality instead.
6. In Japan, what is the comical term applied to an unintended pregnancy before a wedding?

Answer: Oops we did it marriage

The Japanese term "Dekichatta kekkon" (in English), which arose in the early 1990s, translate to "Oops we did it marriage" and refers to a wedding in which the bride is visibly pregnant. According to the Japanese Health, Labor and Welfare ministry, almost one quarter of Japanese brides are pregnant on their wedding day. All things considered, what with the condition of the bride and all, "Labor" is a most appropriate term for this ministry.
7. Is it true that a forced marriage in olden times in England was once known as a knobstick wedding?

Answer: Yes

Most prevalent in the United Kingdom during the early years of the 18th century, a knobstick wedding was one in which a single pregnant girl, and the father of her child, were forced to the marriage altar by the authorities of the time. The term derives from the staves of office carried by the church wardens who were always present at these weddings to ensure they were carried out. One of the reasons behind these forced marriages was that, until a Parliamentary Act was passed in 1733 that stated the father of a child had to pay for that child's maintenance, a single mother and her child became the responsibility of her local parish.

Other countries sometimes use the term "a shotgun wedding" to refer to a forced marriage between a pregnant girl and the child's father, but "knobstick wedding" referred specifically to a wedding enforced by a local parish.
8. For which security reason were bridesmaids dressed in identical outfits as their brides in feudal China?

Answer: To confuse kidnappers

Going back to older times in England, the purpose of the maid of honour and bridesmaids were to assist a queen at her wedding, with the maid of honour given the top position. This evolved over time into the western marriage ceremonies of today. In feudal China however, bridesmaids served a darker purpose than simply assisting a blushing bride at her wedding.

They were there to protect the bride from being kidnapped by rival clans, or, to be more precise, to protect the blushing bride's womb because of its value in producing an heir.

The bridesmaids were therefore dressed up in identical clothing to the bride herself in order to confuse any attempts at kidnapping, or to prevent the bride from being singled out and robbed.
9. In which western religion were premarital relations a perfectly normal part of life until parliament legislated against it in 1753?

Answer: Anglican

The Marriage Act of 1753 in England and Wales was also known as "An Act for the Better Preventing of Clandestine Marriage" and was the first government legislation in these two countries that required a formally approved marriage - with several preconditions to the marriage written into the Act. Prior to this a simple exchange of consent was considered enough proof that a couple were bound to one another, to be later married by an Anglican minister.

The act was instigated by an argument over whether a Scottish marriage was considered legal or not, and to prevent clandestine weddings taking place.

This Act decreed, among other things, that the marriage had to be announced publicly in a church beforehand, or a licence obtained, and that parental consent was required for any member of the couple under the age of twenty-one.

There were ways and means of circumventing these laws, but it was difficult to achieve this.
10. The Marriage Act of 1836 legalised which form of marriage in England and Wales?

Answer: Civil marriages

Prior to the Marriage Act of 1836, the only legally recognised form of marriage in England and Wales was one carried out by a Church of England (Anglican) minister. This meant that marriages between Jews, Quakers, Hindus, Roman Catholics, atheists, Muslims or those from any other faith had to be carried out in an Anglican setting to be legally recognised, even if the relevant couple had been previously married in their own institutions.

Otherwise, there were no recognised legal rights between a couple should the marriage fail.

The Marriage Act of 1836 allowed civil marriages to be carried out in buildings belonging to all these other establishments if a registrar and two other witnesses to the wedding were in attendance.
Source: Author Creedy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor stedman before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Most Recent Scores
Feb 01 2023 : Guest 159: 0/10
Feb 01 2023 : Guest 207: 8/10
Jan 28 2023 : BarbaraMcI: 8/10
Jan 26 2023 : Guest 99: 5/10
Jan 26 2023 : Guest 209: 7/10
Jan 24 2023 : Guest 32: 0/10
Jan 16 2023 : Guest 172: 7/10
Jan 06 2023 : bmrsnr: 10/10
Dec 29 2022 : Possum1: 8/10

Related Quizzes
1. Fantastic Fa'a Samoa! Average
2. Grin and Bare It! Average
3. Guildmade Maidens Difficult
4. Justa Word in Spanish Average
5. Last Rites Average
6. LGBT Signs and Symbols Difficult
7. Polynesia, Melanesia and Micronesia Average
8. Anglo-American Cultures Average
9. Australian-American Culture Difficult

2/2/2023, Copyright 2023 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us