Quiz about Italian Body Parts in Common Expressions
Quiz about Italian Body Parts in Common Expressions

Italian Body Parts in Common Expressions Quiz


I will give you the idiom in English and you choose the correct Italian equivalent for the first five questions and then vice versa for the second five questions. No accents are included. All questions are multiple choice. Enjoy!

A multiple-choice quiz by miss g. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
miss g
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
166,610
Updated
Nov 03 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
1294
Last 3 plays: Guest 98 (4/10), Trikeman (6/10), Guest 24 (5/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. How do Italians express the idea of something costing a fortune or 'an arm and a leg' as per the common English expression? Hint

costare un occhio della testa
non chiudere occhio
sognare ad occhi aperti
a quattr'occhi

2. How does an Italian express the idea of a person having 'guts' or being brave? Hint

come un fulmine
mangiarsi il fegato
aver fegato
andare in fume

3. Let's look at how the foot, 'il piede' is used in the Italian language. How does Italian express the idea that a criminal is 'at large'? Hint

a piede libero
cadere in piedi
avere un piede nella bara
un lavoro fatto con i piedi

4. How does an Italian express the idea of 'watching one's back', or 'being ready for anything'? Hint

alzare le spalle
vivere alle spalle di qualcuno
guardarsi le spalle
dietro le spalle

5. How do Italians express the idea of 'catching someone red-handed'? Hint

prendere con le mani nel sacco
rimanere a mani vuote
mordersi le mani
sotto mano

6. Now I will give you an expression in Italian which contains a body part and you select the closest English equivalent. What's the closest English equivalent to 'avere le mani bucate'? Hint

to give a hand
to change hands
for money to burn a hole in one's pockets
to have nothing to be ashamed of

7. What is the nearest English equivalent to 'avere buon naso'? Hint

to make one's flesh crawl
right under one's nose
to know the score
to lose one's life

8. How do Italians express the idea of someone being 'sulla bocca di tutti'? Hint

skin and bones
all ears
the talk of the town
thick-skinned

9. What's the nearest English translation to 'piegare la schiena'? Hint

to go to rack and ruin
to try to look big
to be stark-naked
to admit defeat

10. And finally, what is meant by 'alzare il gomito'? Hint

to rub shoulders with
to drink
not to be all there
to twiddle one's thumbs


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. How do Italians express the idea of something costing a fortune or 'an arm and a leg' as per the common English expression?

Answer: costare un occhio della testa

'Costare un occhio della testa' in Italian means that an eye is given in exchange for something valuable rather than the English 'arm and a leg'. 'Sognare ad occhi aperti' means 'to daydream' or literally 'to dream with eyes open'. 'Non chiudere occhio' means 'to not sleep a wink' or literally 'to not close one's eyes' and 'a quattr'occhi' means 'privately' or literally 'with four eyes' - in other words, with very few people knowing.

There are many Italian expressions involving the eye or 'l'occhio'.
2. How does an Italian express the idea of a person having 'guts' or being brave?

Answer: aver fegato

'Il fegato' literally is 'the liver' but according to the Italian language, it is also the source of bravery. Another expression inolving 'il fegato' is 'mangiarsi il fegato' which although literally means 'to eat one's liver', in practice means 'to kick oneself'.

The idea of courage can also be expressed 'non aver sangue nelle vene' - 'to not have blood in one's veins'. 'Andare in fumo' means 'to go up in smoke' and 'come un fulmine' means to do something 'like lightning' or 'like a shot'.
3. Let's look at how the foot, 'il piede' is used in the Italian language. How does Italian express the idea that a criminal is 'at large'?

Answer: a piede libero

'A piede libero' is literally 'with a free foot'. 'Avere un piede nella bara' literally means 'to have one foot in the coffin' but is close to the English 'one foot in the grave'. 'La bara' is commonly replaced with 'la fossa' which is indeed the 'grave' or 'pit'. 'Cadere in piedi' means 'to land on one's feet' and 'un lavoro fatto con i piedi' is literally 'a job done with one's feet' so therefore a poor piece of work.
4. How does an Italian express the idea of 'watching one's back', or 'being ready for anything'?

Answer: guardarsi le spalle

In Italian, one watches one's 'shoulder' - la spalla (singular), le spalle (plural) instead of one's back as in English. 'Vivere alle spalle di qualcuno' means 'to sponge off someone' or literally 'to live off someone's shoulders'. 'Dietro le spalle' means 'behind someone's back' or literally 'shoulders', and lastly, 'alzare le spalle' means 'to shrug the shoulders'.
5. How do Italians express the idea of 'catching someone red-handed'?

Answer: prendere con le mani nel sacco

'Prendere con le mani nel sacco' literally means 'caught/taken with one's hands in the bag'. 'Mordersi le mani' is literally 'to bite one's hands' but in practice means 'to kick oneself'; 'rimanere a mani vuote' means 'to be left empty-handed' and 'sotto mano' literally means 'under hand' and therefore means 'sly or sneaky'.

The word 'la mano' (hand) is interesting because although it ends in 'o', it is in fact feminine. The plural is formed by changing the 'o' to an 'i' as per regular grammar but it's important to remember that any subsequent adjectives must follow the feminine endings where applicable e.g le mani vuote.
6. Now I will give you an expression in Italian which contains a body part and you select the closest English equivalent. What's the closest English equivalent to 'avere le mani bucate'?

Answer: for money to burn a hole in one's pockets

Literally this expression refers to the hands themselves having holes and not the pockets! 'To change hands' is 'cambiare di mano', 'to give a hand' is 'dare una mano' and finally 'to have nothing to be ashamed of' is 'avere le mani pulite' or literally 'to have clean hands'.
7. What is the nearest English equivalent to 'avere buon naso'?

Answer: to know the score

'Avere buon naso' is literally 'to have a good nose'. 'To be right under one's nose' is expressed 'proprio sotto il naso'. 'Far accapponare la pelle' is 'to make the flesh crawl', and finally, 'to lose one's life' is 'lasciarsi la pelle' or literally 'to lose one's skin'.
8. How do Italians express the idea of someone being 'sulla bocca di tutti'?

Answer: the talk of the town

'Sulla bocca di tutti' is similar to the English expression of being the name 'on everyone's lips', but is intended in a more negative manner. 'La bocca' means 'mouth'. 'All ears' is expressed as 'con le orecchie tese' (with tense ears) and also more literally 'tutt'orecchie'. 'Thick-skinned' is expressed as 'hard skin' in the expression 'avere pelle dura' and finally 'skin and bones' is literally translated 'pelle e ossa'.
9. What's the nearest English translation to 'piegare la schiena'?

Answer: to admit defeat

'Piegare la schiena' is literally 'to bend one's back'. 'La schiena' is the 'back'. 'To go to rack and ruin' is 'andare a rovina', 'to be stark-naked' is 'essere nudo come un verme' or literally 'to be as nude as a worm' and finally 'to try to look big' is 'darsi importanza', or literally 'to give oneself importance'.
10. And finally, what is meant by 'alzare il gomito'?

Answer: to drink

'Alzare il gomito' literally means 'to raise or lift the elbow'. 'To rub shoulders with' also uses the Italian word for 'elbow' in 'trovarsi gomito a gomito' which is 'to find oneself elbow to elbow'. 'Not to be all there' is 'mancare un venerdi', 'to lack a Friday' and lastly 'to twiddle one's thumbs' is expressed 'grattarsi la pancia', 'to scratch one's belly'. I hope you've enjoyed this quiz! Thanks for playing.
Source: Author miss g

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