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Quiz about Which Station am I
Quiz about Which Station am I

Which Station am I? Trivia Quiz


I'll give you a description of a station and you tell me which it is.

A multiple-choice quiz by VerticalDancer. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
315,914
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
9 / 10
Plays
1194
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 78 (3/10), Guest 86 (10/10), Guest 185 (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. This station was the first to be opened (on 10th January 1863). Its entrance is on a street by the same name, and the most famous address on that street is 221b, even though it doesn't exist! It is close to Regent's Park and Marylebone. Which station is it? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. The next station is on the Piccadilly Line. Its name is actually a corruption - the site near where it sits was once a walled garden belonging to the monks of Westminster Abbey. The surrounding area is now the site of a thriving market, though it's not really a garden market anymore. If one were to catch a train from this station to the nearest station, it would be the most expensive journey in the world. The station is said to be haunted. Which station is it? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. This station is named after a pub, though some people insist that the name is a corruption of Eleanor of Castile. The first baby to be born on the Tube was born in this station. It is on the Bakerloo and Northern Lines in South London. Which station is it? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. This station was named for a famous battle which took place in 1815, in which Wellington finally overthrew Napoleon. The shortest Tube line runs from this station to Bank, but other lines to this station are the Jubilee Line and Northern Line. Which station is it? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The next station was named after the Knights Templar, as it is located very near to where they had their quarters. It is in the heart of legal London, being located near two of the Inns of Court. Its namesake also formed part of Dan Brown's "The da Vinci Code". Where is it? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. This station on the Central and Piccadilly Lines takes its name from part of the River Fleet, although its original name was extended to include the name Kingsway. Part of the station has also been called British Museum. It has now been renamed according to the name of the area which has been so-called since at least 951. The name itself means the stream in the hollow. Which station is it? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This station is in the centre of London, and post-codes are designated by direction from this spot. It is the station at which one would alight for Trafalgar Square, St Martin's in the Fields, the National Gallery or the National Portrait Gallery. The station itself has old pictures painted on the walls, depicting a long journey. A famous film was once made about a road bearing the same name as this station. Which is it? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. This station is in an area which has hardly changed its name since 1294! There are actually two stations here - one which serves the Hammersmith & City Line, and another which serves the Piccadilly and District Lines. The name possibly refers to a mediaeval trade. A well-known venue near the station is the Apollo. Which station is it? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. You'd have to be mad to go to this station! It's on the District Line, near the eastern end of the line. The name - although it sounds like a dog's sound - actually rather boringly means the home of the Bercias. Which station is it? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. The final station sounds very like the surname of Heather Graham's character in "Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me". It is found on the East London Line as well as the Docklands Light Railway. The name actually means shallow well. Which station is it? Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This station was the first to be opened (on 10th January 1863). Its entrance is on a street by the same name, and the most famous address on that street is 221b, even though it doesn't exist! It is close to Regent's Park and Marylebone. Which station is it?

Answer: Baker Street

When Baker Street Station first opened the only line to run through it was the Metropolitan Line. It was the first underground railway line to be opened in the world.

Sherlock Holmes, created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, lived at 221b Baker Street, which is a fictitious address. However the Sherlock Holmes Museum purports to be at that address as it was given permission to use it by the City of Westminster. It is really located at 237-241 Baker Street (www.wikipedia.org).
2. The next station is on the Piccadilly Line. Its name is actually a corruption - the site near where it sits was once a walled garden belonging to the monks of Westminster Abbey. The surrounding area is now the site of a thriving market, though it's not really a garden market anymore. If one were to catch a train from this station to the nearest station, it would be the most expensive journey in the world. The station is said to be haunted. Which station is it?

Answer: Covent Garden

Covent Garden Station was opened on 11 April 1907. The name is a corruption of Convent Garden, as which it was recorded in 1491. The market itself is also a tradition, dating back to a fruit market recorded in 1661.

According to www.wikipedia.org, the ghost of William Terriss, an actor, haunts the station.

Also according to www.wikipedia.org, if one were to take a 4 tube fare from Covent Garden to Leicester Square, it would work out at 24.84 per mile!
3. This station is named after a pub, though some people insist that the name is a corruption of Eleanor of Castile. The first baby to be born on the Tube was born in this station. It is on the Bakerloo and Northern Lines in South London. Which station is it?

Answer: Elephant and Castle

Although the Elephant and Castle pub was destroyed in 1959, the crest which showed the elephant and the castle was preserved. It can now be found in the shopping centre in Elephant and Castle.

The first baby to be born on the Tube was Marie Cordery in 1924, and she was born at Elephant and Castle Station.
4. This station was named for a famous battle which took place in 1815, in which Wellington finally overthrew Napoleon. The shortest Tube line runs from this station to Bank, but other lines to this station are the Jubilee Line and Northern Line. Which station is it?

Answer: Waterloo

The battle of Waterloo took place in France in 1815 in Belgium. There were really two armies against the French - the Anglo-Allied army, which was led by the Duke of Wellington, and the Prussian army which was led by Gebhard von Blucher. The Anglo/Prussian victory restored Louis XVIII to the throne after he had been exiled for 100 days.
5. The next station was named after the Knights Templar, as it is located very near to where they had their quarters. It is in the heart of legal London, being located near two of the Inns of Court. Its namesake also formed part of Dan Brown's "The da Vinci Code". Where is it?

Answer: Temple

Temple is on the Circle and District Lines, and opens onto the Embankment. Temple Church itself is located in the Middle Temple, and has survived for approximately 800 years nearly intact. The Temple and the Knights Templar feature in "The da Vinci Code", which suggests that the Knights Templar was an order which was set up to protect a secret surrounding the Holy Grail.
6. This station on the Central and Piccadilly Lines takes its name from part of the River Fleet, although its original name was extended to include the name Kingsway. Part of the station has also been called British Museum. It has now been renamed according to the name of the area which has been so-called since at least 951. The name itself means the stream in the hollow. Which station is it?

Answer: Holborn

The station was originally called Holborn-Kingsway, Kingsway being the name of the cross-street onto which it opens (the other street being High Holborn). Kingsway itself was a street which was created in 1901 to clear the slums around the area, which is hard to believe looking at the lovely area now!
7. This station is in the centre of London, and post-codes are designated by direction from this spot. It is the station at which one would alight for Trafalgar Square, St Martin's in the Fields, the National Gallery or the National Portrait Gallery. The station itself has old pictures painted on the walls, depicting a long journey. A famous film was once made about a road bearing the same name as this station. Which is it?

Answer: Charing Cross

Charing Cross is so-named because King Edward I set up a stone cross in the area to mark the last resting place of the cortege of his wife, Queen Eleanor. The pictures painted on the walls of the station depict the cortege.

The Charing part comes from the Anglo-Saxon village, which was called Cyrringe.

The film referred to above is "84 Charing Cross Road".
8. This station is in an area which has hardly changed its name since 1294! There are actually two stations here - one which serves the Hammersmith & City Line, and another which serves the Piccadilly and District Lines. The name possibly refers to a mediaeval trade. A well-known venue near the station is the Apollo. Which station is it?

Answer: Hammersmith

Hammersmith was recorded as Hammersmyth in 1294, and as Hammersmith in 1675. Although there is some doubt about the name - some people believe that it means village (ham) on the river (hythe) - it is generally accepted that it refers to the blacksmith trade.
9. You'd have to be mad to go to this station! It's on the District Line, near the eastern end of the line. The name - although it sounds like a dog's sound - actually rather boringly means the home of the Bercias. Which station is it?

Answer: Barking

Phil on EastEnders used to regularly use the phrase "gone to Dagenham", meaning gone crazy, as Dagenham is three stops short of Barking on the District Line (though Phil for some reason always said it was two stops short of Barking. Perhaps he'd gone to Dagenham himself!).

Barking was originally an overground station, but was converted to a Tube station in 1902.
10. The final station sounds very like the surname of Heather Graham's character in "Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me". It is found on the East London Line as well as the Docklands Light Railway. The name actually means shallow well. Which station is it?

Answer: Shadwell

Heather Graham played Felicity Shagwell in "Austin Power: The Spy Who Shagged Me", which always makes me snigger when I go past Shadwell on the Tube! The area has been called a variation of Shadwell since 1233, when it was recorded in the Domesday Book as Shadewell.
Source: Author VerticalDancer

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor stedman before going online.
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