Quiz about Clap Hands Here Comes Charlie
Quiz about Clap Hands Here Comes Charlie

Clap Hands, Here Comes Charlie Quiz


Charlie Muffin, Britain's scruffiest spy, surveyed the Cold Case files on his desk. In one he would find the identity of the KGB's most important double agent of the past 100 years. That spy had been born or called Charles, Charlie or Chuck.

A multiple-choice quiz by darksplash. Estimated time: 7 mins.
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Author
darksplash
Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
330,490
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
357
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
1. Charlie Muffin, Britain's scruffiest spy, eased his aching feet from his battered Hush Puppies and sighed; it always felt so good. He picked up one of the cold case files on his desk. In one he would find the identity of a Soviet double agent. The first looked promising, an actor - always suspect in the eyes of the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS). What's more, it was an actor with a funny moustache and a walking stick, (probably tipped with poison). Who did Charlie Muffin think the double agent might be? Hint

Charles Ives
Charles Gray
Charlie Chaplin
Charley Chase

2. Charlie Muffin, leaned back in his SIS-issue office chair and examined a stain on his tie. He sniffed: it smelled like curry sauce. "That'll never come out", sighed Charlie. The tie had cost him $1 on a visit to New York. He bemoaned the wasted greenback and picked up a cold case file still looking for a Soviet agent. Incredibly, he learned that its subject was a man who was loved and dismissed in almost equal measure. This was a man who talked to flowers and loved the planet but threw architects into a rage. Who was the Charles that was born to be king? Hint

Charles Bedford
Charles Brighton
Charles Weston
Charles Windsor

3. Charlie Muffin worked diligently in his SIS office folding a piece of cardboard in two and covering every surface tightly with sticky tape. He placed the finished 'patch' in his shoe. If it didn't rain too heavily, that would keep the sole intact while he continued the search among his cold case files for a Soviet double agent.
He picked up a file and could not help singing to himself:
"Is anybody goin' to San Antone
Or Phoenix Arizona
Anyplace is alright as long as I
Can forget I've ever known her"
Which American country singer was allegedly in the frame to be the Soviet Union's best spy of the last 100 years?
Hint

Charles Gavin
Charley Pride
Charles L. Grant
Charles Webb

4. Charlie Muffin moved closer to the one-bar electric fire concealed behind his desk. It was the end of September, but Civil Service rules said the heating would not come on until October 1st, no matter how cold it was. Charlie had liberated the fire from the typists' pool and successfully concealed it through the resulting full-scale investigation. He picked up a cold case file from his desk Aha! A man who had tried to disguise the fact that he was born with the name Charles by changing it. If he had been a spy he would have earned a Hero of the Soviet Union Medal and it would now have to be plucked from his cold, dead hands. Which rifle-toting, politician-baiting macho actor was the subject of the file? Hint

John Wayne
Charlton Heston
Cary Grant
Alan Alda

5. Charlie Muffin turned the dial on the safe in his office. It was supposed to be for Top Secret files but Charlie used it for his store of blank taxi receipts and the electric fire he had stolen from the typists' pool. Before he could fill in a fictitious bill, he was distracted by one of the cold case files, the subject of which had been judged to be a conman of the highest order. Whose crime became a byword for crooked investments selling? Hint

Charles Davis Tillman
Charlie Brown
Charles Barris
Charles Ponzi

6. Charlie Muffin examined his shirt collar in the mirror behind the office door. It was a bit frayed and he had worn the shirt two days before. With a bit of luck it was fit for one more day this week. The cold case file he opened spoke of a member of an acting dynasty. His father, brothers and sister were all thespians, though confusingly not all shared the same surname. Charlie felt this file packed a lot of potential - maybe this man was a troublemaker like his frequently-arrested father. Whose name was on the cover? Hint

Charles Laughton
Charles Baldwin
Charles Barrymore
Charlie Sheen

7. Charlie Muffin limped across the foyer of Century House, the old SIS headquarters and still home to the SIS dregs not deemed good enough for the palatial new Vauxhall Cross offices overlooking the Thames. He'd had to walk to work this morning because the tube was on strike - again - and it had rained and his right shoe had leaked. He looked at the material in the cold case file pointing to a politician some had called the "Teflon Man", a politician who always seemed to live beyond his means. Which three-times leader of his country must have kissed the Blarney Stone to have got away with it (if there was an it) for so long? Hint

Charles Foster Kane
Charles Montgomery Burns
Charles Darnay
Charles Haughey

8. Charlie Muffin began to study the "Expenses Allowable" section of the Civil Service Handbook. It was his favourite section, the pages were now dog-eared, while the rest of the book was pristine. Maybe he could claim for ripping his trousers on a casually abandoned bike. He began to study the cold case file of Soviet spy suspect who preferred a nickname to his real first name. Could Charlie pin this on him? "That'll be the day" he snorted. Think it over: which of these was the subject of the reports and photographs in the MI6 folder? Hint

Magic Johnson
Bobby Dazzler
Tiger Woods
Buddy Holly

9. Charlie Muffin caught sight of his reflection in the mirror in the lift to his office on the third floor. The suit was looking a bit shiny about the knees. He'd read about the £30 suits that a German store now on every British high street was advertising. If he caught the tube out to Croydon in his hunt for the cold case spy but claimed a taxi fare, maybe he could make up the money. It was funny, Charlie mused, how so many Americans preferred the diminutive 'Chuck' to their given first name. Charlie Muffin doodled X-1 on the file. Who was the the one-time fastest man in the world that the Secret Intelligence Service pondered just might have been a Soviet spy? Hint

Chuck Yeagar
Chuck Larson
Chuck Hayes
Chuck E. Cheese

10. Charlie Muffin knew it was going to be a bad day. Other people knew it when they saw a single magpie; Charlie could tell by the amount of pain in his feet. Today it had reached nine on a scale of one to ten. He picked up the last cold case file from his desk. He knew this was the one that would reveal the KGB's top spy in the west for 100 years. It read like a novel, the story of a secret agent who had betrayed the SIS chief and the CIA boss to the Soviets; a spy who had an affair with a glamorous Russian agent. Whose name was on the cover of the file? Hint

Chuck Berry
Charles M. Schultz
Charlie Muffin
Chas Chandler


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Charlie Muffin, Britain's scruffiest spy, eased his aching feet from his battered Hush Puppies and sighed; it always felt so good. He picked up one of the cold case files on his desk. In one he would find the identity of a Soviet double agent. The first looked promising, an actor - always suspect in the eyes of the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS). What's more, it was an actor with a funny moustache and a walking stick, (probably tipped with poison). Who did Charlie Muffin think the double agent might be?

Answer: Charlie Chaplin

Charlie Chaplin (16th April 1889 to 25th December 1977) was probably one of the first giants of the silver screen. He first appeared in movies in 1910, and his career spanned 75 years, with most of his really famous roles coming in the comedies of the silent era. Just one look at his doleful mustachioed face and the way he twirled his trademark cane were enough to set audiences into peals of laughter.
2. Charlie Muffin, leaned back in his SIS-issue office chair and examined a stain on his tie. He sniffed: it smelled like curry sauce. "That'll never come out", sighed Charlie. The tie had cost him $1 on a visit to New York. He bemoaned the wasted greenback and picked up a cold case file still looking for a Soviet agent. Incredibly, he learned that its subject was a man who was loved and dismissed in almost equal measure. This was a man who talked to flowers and loved the planet but threw architects into a rage. Who was the Charles that was born to be king?

Answer: Charles Windsor

Charles Windsor was, of course, Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales. Windsor was the family named adopted by the British monarchy in the early part of the 20th Century. Prince Charles was unabashed at admitting he talked to the plants in his gardens and he also championed many eco-friendly causes. He was a bitter opponent of many modernist architectural designs.
3. Charlie Muffin worked diligently in his SIS office folding a piece of cardboard in two and covering every surface tightly with sticky tape. He placed the finished 'patch' in his shoe. If it didn't rain too heavily, that would keep the sole intact while he continued the search among his cold case files for a Soviet double agent. He picked up a file and could not help singing to himself: "Is anybody goin' to San Antone Or Phoenix Arizona Anyplace is alright as long as I Can forget I've ever known her" Which American country singer was allegedly in the frame to be the Soviet Union's best spy of the last 100 years?

Answer: Charley Pride

"Is anybody goin' to San Antone" was one of a multitude of US Country Number One hits for Charley Pride in a career that started in 1965. Pride also won many awards, including a Grammy.
4. Charlie Muffin moved closer to the one-bar electric fire concealed behind his desk. It was the end of September, but Civil Service rules said the heating would not come on until October 1st, no matter how cold it was. Charlie had liberated the fire from the typists' pool and successfully concealed it through the resulting full-scale investigation. He picked up a cold case file from his desk Aha! A man who had tried to disguise the fact that he was born with the name Charles by changing it. If he had been a spy he would have earned a Hero of the Soviet Union Medal and it would now have to be plucked from his cold, dead hands. Which rifle-toting, politician-baiting macho actor was the subject of the file?

Answer: Charlton Heston

Charlton Heston was born John Charles Carter on October 4th 1923 and died on April 5th 2008.
He was known as something of an action hero, and among his best-known movies were "The Greatest Show on Earth" (1952); "Pony Express" (1953); "The Ten Commandments" (1956); "El Cid" (1961) and "Planet of the Apes" (1968). He won as Oscar for his role in "Ben-Hur" (1961).
Throughout his career, Heston was politically active. He was a supporter of John Kennedy and the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and in later years was president of the National Rifle Association from 1998 to 2003. In that role, he taunted gun-control campaigners in 2001 by brandishing a musket and paraphrasing the NRA's motto "I have only five words for you: From my cold, dead hands."
5. Charlie Muffin turned the dial on the safe in his office. It was supposed to be for Top Secret files but Charlie used it for his store of blank taxi receipts and the electric fire he had stolen from the typists' pool. Before he could fill in a fictitious bill, he was distracted by one of the cold case files, the subject of which had been judged to be a conman of the highest order. Whose crime became a byword for crooked investments selling?

Answer: Charles Ponzi

The Italian financier Charles Ponzi (March 3rd, 1882 to January 18th, 1949) became known as one of the greatest swindlers of his time. After settling in America, he was involved in several frauds and spent time in jail. One involved exploiting a loophole that Ponzi spotted in the International Reply Coupon postage system that seemingly offered huge returns.

He was soon taking in money hand over fist and paying out huge returns. But the scheme depended on money continuing to come in, and when it dried up, the later investors were left with nothing.

When the scheme was finally exposed by 'The Boston Globe' in 1920, Ponzi was jailed. The failure of his financial empire brought five banks down with it.
6. Charlie Muffin examined his shirt collar in the mirror behind the office door. It was a bit frayed and he had worn the shirt two days before. With a bit of luck it was fit for one more day this week. The cold case file he opened spoke of a member of an acting dynasty. His father, brothers and sister were all thespians, though confusingly not all shared the same surname. Charlie felt this file packed a lot of potential - maybe this man was a troublemaker like his frequently-arrested father. Whose name was on the cover?

Answer: Charlie Sheen

Charlie Sheen, or to give him his real name, Carlos Irwin Estévez was born on September 3rd, 1965. He was the son of Martin Sheen and brother of Emilio Estévez, Ramón Estévez, and Renée Estévez. Among his movies were "Platoon" (1986) and "Hot Shots!" (1991). His father, Martin, had strong political views and was frequently arrested on various protests.
7. Charlie Muffin limped across the foyer of Century House, the old SIS headquarters and still home to the SIS dregs not deemed good enough for the palatial new Vauxhall Cross offices overlooking the Thames. He'd had to walk to work this morning because the tube was on strike - again - and it had rained and his right shoe had leaked. He looked at the material in the cold case file pointing to a politician some had called the "Teflon Man", a politician who always seemed to live beyond his means. Which three-times leader of his country must have kissed the Blarney Stone to have got away with it (if there was an it) for so long?

Answer: Charles Haughey

Charles James Haughey (16th September 1925 to 13th June 2006) was Taoiseach (Prime Minister) of the Republic of Ireland from December 1979 to June 1981; March 1982 to December 1982; and March 1987 to February 1992. His political career was frequently embroiled in controversy, and many opponents could not understand how he enjoyed a lifestyle that seemed at odds with his known income as a politician and Prime Minister.

In the mid 1960s, Haughey, by then a Government Minister, was implicated in a plot to import arms to Ireland for the use of the IRA in their campaign in Northern Ireland. No guilt was ever established.

His enemies called Charles Haughey a "Teflon Man" because no scandal ever seemed to stick to him.
8. Charlie Muffin began to study the "Expenses Allowable" section of the Civil Service Handbook. It was his favourite section, the pages were now dog-eared, while the rest of the book was pristine. Maybe he could claim for ripping his trousers on a casually abandoned bike. He began to study the cold case file of Soviet spy suspect who preferred a nickname to his real first name. Could Charlie pin this on him? "That'll be the day" he snorted. Think it over: which of these was the subject of the reports and photographs in the MI6 folder?

Answer: Buddy Holly

Charles Hardin Holley, aka Buddy Holly, was born in September 7th 1936 in Lubbock, Texas, and died in a plane crash in Cerro Gordo County, Iowa on February 3rd 1959. For someone whose professional career lasted just about 18 months, Holly had a phenomenal influence on rock and roll music. With his band, 'The Crickets', Holly created a style of music that was to influence many other artists, including The Beatles and Bob Dylan. Only three albums were released by Buddy Holly and The Crickets, but so many tracks were laid down that many more were released after his death. Two of the best-known songs were "That'll Be The Day" and "Think It Over".
9. Charlie Muffin caught sight of his reflection in the mirror in the lift to his office on the third floor. The suit was looking a bit shiny about the knees. He'd read about the £30 suits that a German store now on every British high street was advertising. If he caught the tube out to Croydon in his hunt for the cold case spy but claimed a taxi fare, maybe he could make up the money. It was funny, Charlie mused, how so many Americans preferred the diminutive 'Chuck' to their given first name. Charlie Muffin doodled X-1 on the file. Who was the the one-time fastest man in the world that the Secret Intelligence Service pondered just might have been a Soviet spy?

Answer: Chuck Yeagar

The US Air Force major general Charles Elwood "Chuck" Yeager was born on February 13th , 1923) in Myra, West Virginia. He flew Mustang P51 fighter planes during WW2, and after the war became a test pilot. On October 14th 1947 he became the first man to break the sound barrier when his experimental Bell X-1 reached Mach 1, 768mph. Subsequently he went on to set or better a number of other world aeronautical records.
10. Charlie Muffin knew it was going to be a bad day. Other people knew it when they saw a single magpie; Charlie could tell by the amount of pain in his feet. Today it had reached nine on a scale of one to ten. He picked up the last cold case file from his desk. He knew this was the one that would reveal the KGB's top spy in the west for 100 years. It read like a novel, the story of a secret agent who had betrayed the SIS chief and the CIA boss to the Soviets; a spy who had an affair with a glamorous Russian agent. Whose name was on the cover of the file?

Answer: Charlie Muffin

Charlie Muffin heard footsteps - heavy men moving with menace - in the corridor. He had long known this moment would come. Moving quickly, Charlie upended the wooden hat stand and put one end in the gap between the safe and the wall. The other he wedged behind a filing cabinet screwed to the floor. From the safe he took a rope ladder. Long ago Charlie had freed the catches that were meant to stop the window opening more than two inches. Opening it fully, he attached the rope ladder to the radiator and threw it (the ladder) out of the window. Charlie looked around, briefly preparing for his escape. Moments later the door burst open. Four ex-SAS heavies and 'C', the head of MI6 entered. "He's gone out the window", someone shouted, "quick, downstairs!" The five men left the room. Charlie Muffin emerged from under the desk shaking his head at the grammar. He strolled out the door and climbed the stairs and through the fire door onto the roof. It was the work of a moment to cross to the roof next door and go downstairs and to Kings Cross Station, where his 'pension plan' left luggage box waited.
Charlie had a plan. A train to Harwich; ferry to Hook of Holland; bus to Amsterdam and then a plane. They would expect him to go east, so he would go west. Canada was the place, Charlie decided. He knew of a funtrivia.com editor who lived in Alberta and would surely take him in. Charlie hoped the weather was warm in Alberta. Charlie didn't like cold weather. Not with his feet...

The question in part summarises the 'life story' of Charlie Muffin, probably Britain's best fictional spy. Charlie Muffin was the creation of Brian Freemantle and appeared in 13 novels.
Source: Author darksplash

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Snowman before going online.
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