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With Christmas Day just around the corner, let's get festive and join Welsh-speakers, Rhys and Eleri, as they enjoy the run up to the big day. You will need at least a basic understanding of Welsh in order to do well on this quiz. Pob lwc i bawb!

A multiple-choice quiz by poshprice. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
poshprice
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
355,803
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
330
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. Ecstatic that school has finished for the holidays, Rhys and Eleri head off to Wales' capital city, Cardiff, to do a spot of Christmas shopping. On arrival, they hear the words to "Tawel Nos", which soon puts a smile on both of their faces, as it is one of their favourite carols. What popular Christmas carol is it that Rhys and Eleri are hearing here? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Having braved the crowds of Cardiff, a tired Rhys and Eleri return home and collapse onto the sofa, before turning their attention to the smells wafting in from the kitchen, where their mam has been baking. "Mmmm!" says Rhys appreciatively, before asking, "Gai mins pei, mam?" What delicious, seasonal treat of his mam's is Rhys hankering after here? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Relatives from Aberystwyth have come to visit, and Rhys and Eleri are tasked with looking after their younger cousin, six-year old Osian, who is refusing to go to bed. Racking her brains for something that will convince her merry, little cousin that sleep is the best option, Eleri finally lands on a plan. No sooner has she uttered the words, "Bydd dim Sin Corn yn dod os nad wyt ti'n fachgen da", then the mischievous, little monkey is tucked up in bed. Undoubtedly, it is the mention of "Sin Corn" that does the trick - but who is he? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. One of Eleri and Rhys' favourite things to do over the Christmas period is to walk down their local High Street, while tucking into a hot bag of chips. Taking their time, they peer into each shop window, before picking their favourite festive display. Sure enough as they turn into their own street, Eleri declares that her favourite is the shop that has the "golygfa'r geni" on display. Which of the following best describes Eleri's favourite Christmas window? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. It's time for the big, Christmas food shop, and Eleri and Rhys, who are accompanied by their parents, are eager to fill their trolley with sugary goodness. They head straight for the chocolate aisle, but are soon stopped by their mam, who reminds them that their first port of call is the meat counter, as she needs to pick up the "twrci" that's been ordered. What Christmas dinner staple is it that their mam is talking about here? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Rhys and Eleri's living room now resembles Santa's grotto, as they are both hard at work wrapping presents. But, as Eleri ploughs on, Rhys decides to take a break, and so wanders over to the window. All of a sudden, he inhales sharply, before calling out excitedly to his sister, "Eleri, mae'n bwrw eira!" What has Rhys seen, which has made him so excited? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. With a thick layer of snow now covering the ground outside, Rhys and Eleri, along with the rest of the children in the street, are eager to be out in it. However they must first pass their mam's rigorous inspection, which Rhys unfortunately fails. Therefore as Eleri makes a mad dash for the front door, Rhys is sent to find his missing "menig", which he needs to be wearing before being allowed to join his sister outside. What item of clothing is it that Rhys needs to locate? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Oh dear! Poor Rhys and Eleri have caught a cold, and are in bed recovering. They are feeling very sorry for themselves, because they are too ill to attend a friend's Christmas party. Trying to cheer them up, their dad surprises them with a hot beverage, which he calls "siocled poeth". What comforting drink has he brought his sickly children? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. It is Christmas Eve, and Rhys and Eleri are getting ready for bed, and are as excited as can be. As they pull back the covers, their mam reminds them to hang their "hosanau Nadolig" on the end of their beds. Which Christmas tradition is their mam reminding them of here? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Finally, it's Christmas Day, and as expected, Eleri and Rhys are up early, before dawn. Together, they burst into their parents' bedroom, dragging their stockings behind them, and yelling "Nadolig Llawen", over and over again. What on earth is it that they are saying to their mam and dad? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Ecstatic that school has finished for the holidays, Rhys and Eleri head off to Wales' capital city, Cardiff, to do a spot of Christmas shopping. On arrival, they hear the words to "Tawel Nos", which soon puts a smile on both of their faces, as it is one of their favourite carols. What popular Christmas carol is it that Rhys and Eleri are hearing here?

Answer: Silent Night

As with most popular Christmas carols, "Silent Night," has been translated into Welsh, and is a firm favourite in Wales' churches and chapels. Moreover it is also regularly included in school Christmas concerts. The Welsh title, "Tawel Nos", is a literal translation of the English one, yet in everyday conversation, while the English adjective "silent" has numerous synonyms that can be used in its place, the Welsh adjective, "tawel", has considerably less.
2. Having braved the crowds of Cardiff, a tired Rhys and Eleri return home and collapse onto the sofa, before turning their attention to the smells wafting in from the kitchen, where their mam has been baking. "Mmmm!" says Rhys appreciatively, before asking, "Gai mins pei, mam?" What delicious, seasonal treat of his mam's is Rhys hankering after here?

Answer: Mince pies

Unlike most other Welsh words, "mins pei" looks and sounds quite similar to its English counterpart, which is, of course, the humble "mince pie". Though the word "pei" is the most widely used Welsh word for "pie", the word "pastai" can also be used for it. However if you hear a Welsh speaker mention the word "pastai", they may in fact not be eating a pie, but rather a pasty or a tart, as the word can also be used for these two foods.

As for the incorrect answers, in Welsh, "Welsh cakes" are known as "picau ar y maen", while "mulled wine" translates to "gwin gaeaf" and "stuffing" turns to "stwffin".
3. Relatives from Aberystwyth have come to visit, and Rhys and Eleri are tasked with looking after their younger cousin, six-year old Osian, who is refusing to go to bed. Racking her brains for something that will convince her merry, little cousin that sleep is the best option, Eleri finally lands on a plan. No sooner has she uttered the words, "Bydd dim Sin Corn yn dod os nad wyt ti'n fachgen da", then the mischievous, little monkey is tucked up in bed. Undoubtedly, it is the mention of "Sin Corn" that does the trick - but who is he?

Answer: Father Christmas

The above sentence of Eleri's loosely translates to "If you aren't a good boy, then Father Christmas won't come". Meanwhile, the Welsh word, "Sin Corn", bears no resemblance to the English word, "Father Christmas", and is certainly not a literal translation. Rather, the name derives from the term, "corne simne", which is Welsh for "chimney stack". However "Sin" is also a popular Welsh name for a boy, and is the equivalent of the Irish name, Sean.

As for the incorrect answers, in Welsh, "Jack Frost" is known as "Jack Rhew", while "Jesus Christ" is "Iesu Grist" and the "boogeyman" translates to "bwgan" or "bwgi-bo".
4. One of Eleri and Rhys' favourite things to do over the Christmas period is to walk down their local High Street, while tucking into a hot bag of chips. Taking their time, they peer into each shop window, before picking their favourite festive display. Sure enough as they turn into their own street, Eleri declares that her favourite is the shop that has the "golygfa'r geni" on display. Which of the following best describes Eleri's favourite Christmas window?

Answer: A nativity scene

It is the nativity scene that is Eleri's favourite, and the Welsh for it, "golygfa'r geni", is not a literal translation of the English phrase. However, as is quite common with Welsh translations of English phrases, the words are back to front, as "golygfa" means "scene", while "geni" means "birth". Thus, when put together, the loose translation is actually "scene of the birth".
5. It's time for the big, Christmas food shop, and Eleri and Rhys, who are accompanied by their parents, are eager to fill their trolley with sugary goodness. They head straight for the chocolate aisle, but are soon stopped by their mam, who reminds them that their first port of call is the meat counter, as she needs to pick up the "twrci" that's been ordered. What Christmas dinner staple is it that their mam is talking about here?

Answer: Turkey

Once again, the Welsh word, "twrci", is reasonably similar to the English word, "turkey". Moreover the last syllable in each of these two words is identical in sound, despite being spelled differently. As for the incorrect answers, "goose" translates to "gŵydd", and "pheasant" to "ffesant", while "ham" needs no translation, as it remains the same in both languages.
6. Rhys and Eleri's living room now resembles Santa's grotto, as they are both hard at work wrapping presents. But, as Eleri ploughs on, Rhys decides to take a break, and so wanders over to the window. All of a sudden, he inhales sharply, before calling out excitedly to his sister, "Eleri, mae'n bwrw eira!" What has Rhys seen, which has made him so excited?

Answer: Snow

That which Rhys says to Eleri translates to "Eleri, it is snowing", as "eira" is "snow" in Welsh. "Eira" is also a popular, Welsh girl's name.

As for the incorrect answers, "lightning" is "mellt", "hailstones" is either "cenllysg" or "cesair", and the "sun" is known as "haul" in Welsh.
7. With a thick layer of snow now covering the ground outside, Rhys and Eleri, along with the rest of the children in the street, are eager to be out in it. However they must first pass their mam's rigorous inspection, which Rhys unfortunately fails. Therefore as Eleri makes a mad dash for the front door, Rhys is sent to find his missing "menig", which he needs to be wearing before being allowed to join his sister outside. What item of clothing is it that Rhys needs to locate?

Answer: His gloves

"Menig" is the Welsh word for "gloves" or "mittens", and is, like these latter English words, a plural form. However, unlike "gloves" and "mittens", which only need the "s" to be dropped in order to change the words to their singular form, the singular form of "menig" is more complicated, as it is "maneg".

As for the incorrect answers, "hat" is "het" in Welsh, "scarf" is "sgarff", and "coat" is "cot".
8. Oh dear! Poor Rhys and Eleri have caught a cold, and are in bed recovering. They are feeling very sorry for themselves, because they are too ill to attend a friend's Christmas party. Trying to cheer them up, their dad surprises them with a hot beverage, which he calls "siocled poeth". What comforting drink has he brought his sickly children?

Answer: Hot chocolate

"Siocled poeth" is the Welsh word for "hot chocolate", but while "siocled" means "chocolate", and "poeth" is "hot", the order of the words are different in Welsh. Indeed if they were to be literally translated into English, they would read "chocolate hot".

As for the incorrect answers, "tea" is called "te" in Welsh, while "coffee" is "coffi", and "hot milk" is "llaeth poeth".
9. It is Christmas Eve, and Rhys and Eleri are getting ready for bed, and are as excited as can be. As they pull back the covers, their mam reminds them to hang their "hosanau Nadolig" on the end of their beds. Which Christmas tradition is their mam reminding them of here?

Answer: Christmas stockings

"Hosanau Nadolig" is "Christmas stockings" in Welsh, and is, once again, a literal translation of the latter, as "hosanau" is the plural word for "stockings", while "Nadolig" is the Welsh word for "Christmas". You only need to drop the final two letters of "hosanau" in order to make the singular word for "stocking", which is "hosan".
10. Finally, it's Christmas Day, and as expected, Eleri and Rhys are up early, before dawn. Together, they burst into their parents' bedroom, dragging their stockings behind them, and yelling "Nadolig Llawen", over and over again. What on earth is it that they are saying to their mam and dad?

Answer: Merry Christmas

"Nadolig Llawen" is the Welsh way of saying "Merry Christmas", but is not a literal translation, as the words are in the wrong order, with "Nadolig" meaning "Christmas", and "llawen" meaning "merry". Therefore a literal translation of the Welsh way of saying "Merry Christmas" would be "Christmas Merry".

As for the incorrect answers, "Happy Hanukkah" would be "Hanukkah Hapus" in Welsh, and "wake up" would simply be "deffrowch". Finally, "it's late" would translate to "Mae'n hwyr" in Welsh.
Source: Author poshprice

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