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Quiz about You Scurvy Knaves
Quiz about You Scurvy Knaves

You Scurvy Knaves! Trivia Quiz


All at sea with Pirates, Buccaneers, Privateers and the less heroic side of the Royal Navy.

A multiple-choice quiz by Englizzie. Estimated time: 9 mins.
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Author
Englizzie
Time
9 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
318,293
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
406
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. Sir Francis Drake faithfully served Elizabeth I from 1563-1596; filling England's coffers, and his own, with pirated Spanish and Portuguese gold from the New World. He was a brilliant sailor and navigator, and had already circumnavigated the globe prior to the attack by the Spanish Armada in 1588.
What particularly helped the English scuttle the Spanish Armada fleet?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. The English Navy of the 16th Century was generally indistinguishable from piracy and privateering. Much encouraged by the monarchy, who benefited financially from this new influx of wealth, these men flourished. Sir John Hawkins, a cohort of Francis Drake's, was responsible for the redesigning of the English galleons and the reorganization of the navy. Yet he was also an opportunist. He formed a syndicate of wealthy English merchants to finance a new trade venture. What was this new, lucrative trading opportunity? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Naval crews in the 16th century must have been a hardy lot, especially those that sailed around the globe on unknown seas. The early ships of discovery provided little or no comfort for the crew who slept on the hard boards, without the benefit of mattresses or bunks. Wooden cages suspended over the rails addressed the problem of disposal of human waste. What were these contraptions called? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. The dreadful reputation of shipboard food in the Royal Navy, really did not change for nearly 300 years. Food storage was always a problem, so that stores were constantly damp and rotting. Add the infestation of rats and mice and weevils in the biscuits and you have a delightful daily menu. Scurvy was one of the many diseases that was prevalent on long voyages. It was a highly debilitating disease that often proved to be fatal. Before the naval authorities knew the cause of scurvy, how did they deal with the problem? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. With all the wealth that was being carried aboard ships to and from the New World, it was a great time to be a pirate. The most famous of all was Blackbeard, who caused terror and mayhem among the ships that sailed the Caribbean in the first quarter of the 18th century. Despite his fearsome appearance, he is known to have had a weakness for the ladies. About how many wives is he reputed to have had? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Discipline aboard ships was essential, especially in time of war. From the mid 17th century, England was expanding her empire, and the Navy could not function without good order. Punishments for specific offenses were listed in the Admiralty Black Book, such as sleeping on watch. Each offense carried a more and more brutal punishment. What was the punishment for a fourth offense on watch? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Captain William Bligh (of Bounty Mutiny fame) had proven himself a hero and master sailor, prior to taking command of the HMS Bounty in 1787. He was given the mission of sailing to the South Pacific to collect breadfruit trees. Charles Laughton, Trevor Howard and Anthony Hopkins portrayed Bligh, each in their own interpretation. The more empathetic Bligh of Anthony Hopkins was probably nearer the truth. The real reasons for mutiny are somewhat unclear. It would seem that Fletcher Christian and followers would most likely have been hanged, had they ever returned to England.

We know that Fletcher Christian and the other mutineers forced Bligh over the side into the Bounty's cutter with a sextant, cutlasses and several days food and water. What happened to Bligh?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. In the 1780s, the Royal Navy began to dramatically increase its fleet. It grew from 40,000 men in 1782 to 120,000 men in 1799 (bearing in mind that the population of Britain at that time was around 9,000,000). Although the backbone of the navy were volunteers, they were not sufficient to face the increasing threat of war in Europe. What was the primary 'recruiting method' used at this time?

Answer: (Two Words .. this is not Monster.com)
Question 9 of 10
9. "Water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink' - The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Fresh water was scarce and space was limited. Any water, even in casks, did not keep long. Vegetables were cooked in salty water, the steam being cooled in a copper condenser to provide distilled water for the surgeon's use. Beer or wine was the usual tipple, up to a gallon a day per man. The introduction of the rum ration in 1740 was essentially a means to save space. What was the daily ration of rum? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. In fairness to the Royal Navy, I thought we should take a look at the chap that stands atop the column in Trafalgar Square in London, Horatio Nelson. Arguably the finest officer in Royal Navy History. A sort of heroic romanticism seemed to have attached itself to the navy, giving the public an unreal sense of the navy as a whole. Winston Churchill disagreed with such sentiment and uttered the immortal words "Naval Tradition? Monstrous! Nothing but rum, sodomy and the lash". What was one of the main reasons that Nelson was consistently victorious over the French and Spanish fleets? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Sir Francis Drake faithfully served Elizabeth I from 1563-1596; filling England's coffers, and his own, with pirated Spanish and Portuguese gold from the New World. He was a brilliant sailor and navigator, and had already circumnavigated the globe prior to the attack by the Spanish Armada in 1588. What particularly helped the English scuttle the Spanish Armada fleet?

Answer: The use of fire ships.

130 Spanish ships began the attack on England. They dropped anchor off Calais to wait for their Dutch allies. In the meantime, the Spaniards were unprotected. The English floated fire ships toward the Spaniards, causing both damage and chaos among their ships. Behind cover of the smoke and confusion, the English were able to move in close enough for their cannons to be really effective.

The Spaniards found themselves blown into the North Sea, eventually limping home with nearly 60 ships lost. The Spanish were never again considered a major naval power, and Britannia virtually ruled the waves for the next 300 years. Drake died of dysentery in 1596, having unsuccessfully tried to attack San Juan, Puerto Rico.
2. The English Navy of the 16th Century was generally indistinguishable from piracy and privateering. Much encouraged by the monarchy, who benefited financially from this new influx of wealth, these men flourished. Sir John Hawkins, a cohort of Francis Drake's, was responsible for the redesigning of the English galleons and the reorganization of the navy. Yet he was also an opportunist. He formed a syndicate of wealthy English merchants to finance a new trade venture. What was this new, lucrative trading opportunity?

Answer: Slave trade from Africa

John Hawkins knew that the Spanish colonies in the New World were desperately short of manpower. Slave trading was against Spanish law, so they welcomed the opportunity to trade such things as pearls, ginger and sugar (great luxuries at the time) for African slaves.

He made three voyages to what is now Sierra Leone, between 1562 and 1569, enslaving over 1,000 Africans. It was a violent, bloody affair, that probably required killing three times as many people as were taken. They were transported to the Caribbean. Queen Elizabeth, now part of the syndicate, presented Hawkins with his own coat of arms, in thanks. It was not until 1833 that the British Parliament passed the Abolition of Slavery Act, emancipating enslaved people in the British West Indies.
3. Naval crews in the 16th century must have been a hardy lot, especially those that sailed around the globe on unknown seas. The early ships of discovery provided little or no comfort for the crew who slept on the hard boards, without the benefit of mattresses or bunks. Wooden cages suspended over the rails addressed the problem of disposal of human waste. What were these contraptions called?

Answer: Jardines

The jardines or gardens worked reasonably well during calm seas, however in a roaring gale they proved useless. In rough seas the men used the bilges at the bottom of the ship. Despite the bilges being cleaned and scrubbed several times during a long voyage, the ships always carried a noxious odor.
4. The dreadful reputation of shipboard food in the Royal Navy, really did not change for nearly 300 years. Food storage was always a problem, so that stores were constantly damp and rotting. Add the infestation of rats and mice and weevils in the biscuits and you have a delightful daily menu. Scurvy was one of the many diseases that was prevalent on long voyages. It was a highly debilitating disease that often proved to be fatal. Before the naval authorities knew the cause of scurvy, how did they deal with the problem?

Answer: Added additional crew to each extended voyage to make up for those that died.

The truth is that the Naval authorities really didn't care that much what caused scurvy, as long as each ship had their full compliment of crew when they arrived at their destination. It was a matter of having enough able bodied men to do the work.
5. With all the wealth that was being carried aboard ships to and from the New World, it was a great time to be a pirate. The most famous of all was Blackbeard, who caused terror and mayhem among the ships that sailed the Caribbean in the first quarter of the 18th century. Despite his fearsome appearance, he is known to have had a weakness for the ladies. About how many wives is he reputed to have had?

Answer: 14

Blackbeard's real name is uncertain, although he called himself Edward Teach, presented a terrifying appearance. His long black beard covered his face, although he would separate it into tails with colored ribbons. He carried three pairs of pistols, a cutlass and several knives. He was reported to have married at least 14 times, although it is believed that only his final marriage to 14 year-old Mary Ormond was legitimate.

He plundered and pillaged for two or so years, until he was hunted down and killed in a fierce battle, by Royal Naval Lieutenant Robert Maynard, in November of 1718. Maynard displayed 'Blackbeard's head below the bowsprit of his ship, HMS Jane.
6. Discipline aboard ships was essential, especially in time of war. From the mid 17th century, England was expanding her empire, and the Navy could not function without good order. Punishments for specific offenses were listed in the Admiralty Black Book, such as sleeping on watch. Each offense carried a more and more brutal punishment. What was the punishment for a fourth offense on watch?

Answer: Left hanging below the bowsprit in a basket

Sleeping on watch was considered a very serious offense, especially in wartime, when an enemy ship could creep up unnoticed. The ultimate punishment for repeating this offense, was to be put in a covered basket below the bowsprit, with a sharp knife,a mug of ale and half a loaf of bread. A sentry stood watch to prevent the poor offender from returning on board. He was then left with two choices - starve to death or cut himself adrift and drown at sea. It was fiendishly nasty.

Keel-hauling, where the unfortunate was tied to a rope and dragged under the ship, was discontinued by the Royal Navy in 1720. It was usually fatal. Hanging from the yardarm was the standard punishment for mutiny. While public beatings and floggings, sometimes within an inch of your life, were quite usual for minor offenses.
7. Captain William Bligh (of Bounty Mutiny fame) had proven himself a hero and master sailor, prior to taking command of the HMS Bounty in 1787. He was given the mission of sailing to the South Pacific to collect breadfruit trees. Charles Laughton, Trevor Howard and Anthony Hopkins portrayed Bligh, each in their own interpretation. The more empathetic Bligh of Anthony Hopkins was probably nearer the truth. The real reasons for mutiny are somewhat unclear. It would seem that Fletcher Christian and followers would most likely have been hanged, had they ever returned to England. We know that Fletcher Christian and the other mutineers forced Bligh over the side into the Bounty's cutter with a sextant, cutlasses and several days food and water. What happened to Bligh?

Answer: He was eventually promoted to Vice Admiral

Abandoned at sea, Bligh set course for Timor, the nearest European outpost. Despite a very overloaded cutter, he managed to bring the boat safely to Timor after 47 days. Bligh was able to find transport back to England and in October of 1790 Bligh was honorably acquitted for the loss of the Bounty, and records showed him to have been a compassionate commander.

He went on to become Governor of the colony of New South Wales, where he created many enemies in his efforts to stem the rum trade. He was deposed in the 1808 Rum Rebellion. Returning to England in 1810, he was made Rear Admiral and then Vice Admiral a year later. He never went to sea again, and died peacefully at his Bond Street residence, in London, on 7th December 1817.
8. In the 1780s, the Royal Navy began to dramatically increase its fleet. It grew from 40,000 men in 1782 to 120,000 men in 1799 (bearing in mind that the population of Britain at that time was around 9,000,000). Although the backbone of the navy were volunteers, they were not sufficient to face the increasing threat of war in Europe. What was the primary 'recruiting method' used at this time?

Answer: The Press Gang

The Impress Service covered every port in Great Britain, with a captain in charge. The Captain was rarely a seagoing man, and the gangs were rarely made up of sailors, but rather local ruffians and thugs.

These gangs then roamed the countryside looking for likely candidates, being paid by the government for each successfully pressed man. In general their primary targets were merchant seamen, who had some experience at sea. A very old Admiralty rule, still in effect today, made it perfectly legal to press-gang any British subject.

Many times the unwilling participants would be dragged aboard ship and held in a drunken state until sailing. They might not see the shores of England again for several years. Yet it seems to have been an accepted way of life. In addition, in 1795, William Pitt introduced two quota Acts, which allowed those convicted of petty crimes to go to sea, rather than serve out their sentence in prison. Georgian prison sentences at the time were exceptionally harsh for petty crime, which made the idea of going to sea very attractive to many.
9. "Water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink' - The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Fresh water was scarce and space was limited. Any water, even in casks, did not keep long. Vegetables were cooked in salty water, the steam being cooled in a copper condenser to provide distilled water for the surgeon's use. Beer or wine was the usual tipple, up to a gallon a day per man. The introduction of the rum ration in 1740 was essentially a means to save space. What was the daily ration of rum?

Answer: 1 pint for men and 1/2 pint for boys

In 1740, Admiral Vernon, commander in chief of the West Indies, made the decision regarding the rum issue after discusison with captains and surgeons. The resulting mixture was known as Grog, after Admiral Vernon's nickname 'Old Grog'. Additional tots of rum might be ordered up for special occasions, victories and the toasting of the Monarch etc.

In 1850, the ration of rum was reduced to 1/2 gill. A gill is one 1/4 of an Imperial (20 oz) pint, therefore 1/2 a gill would 2-1/2 ounces of grog.
10. In fairness to the Royal Navy, I thought we should take a look at the chap that stands atop the column in Trafalgar Square in London, Horatio Nelson. Arguably the finest officer in Royal Navy History. A sort of heroic romanticism seemed to have attached itself to the navy, giving the public an unreal sense of the navy as a whole. Winston Churchill disagreed with such sentiment and uttered the immortal words "Naval Tradition? Monstrous! Nothing but rum, sodomy and the lash". What was one of the main reasons that Nelson was consistently victorious over the French and Spanish fleets?

Answer: A healthy, well fed crew

Nelson did everything that he could to improve the health and welfare of his men. Good food and the daily ration of lemon juice virtually eliminated scurvy. While there was no cure for Yyllow fever and dysentery, extreme cleanliness was introduced to stop the contagion. The surgeons were given clean accommodations, and began to get a greater understanding of what they could do to save life, gradually giving surgeons greater respect and professional status.

There is much evidence to show that a healthy crew was paramount to victory in war. There are, indeed many historians who believe that if scurvy had been eradicated earlier, England might not have lost their American Colonies.
Source: Author Englizzie

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