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Quiz about Liechtenstein the Principality that Got Away
Quiz about Liechtenstein the Principality that Got Away

Liechtenstein, the Principality that Got Away Quiz


The sixth smallest country in the world packs a lot of personality in it. What do you know of one of the world's lesser-known principalities?

A multiple-choice quiz by LeoDaVinci. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
LeoDaVinci
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
393,460
Updated
Dec 09 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
1504
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
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Question 1 of 10
1. The tiny country is not only landlocked, it's doubly-landlocked. What is the nearest body of water to Liechtenstein? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Interestingly, Liechtenstein came into existence as its own region in 1699 due to what event? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Liechtenstein is sometimes referred to as the "canton that got away", meaning, that it ought to have been under Swiss governing. Was Liechtenstein ever a part of Switzerland?


Question 4 of 10
4. Some might know that the capital of Liechtenstein is Vaduz, but few know that the largest city in the country is Schaan. In 2015-16, the population of Schaan was nearly 11% larger than in Vaduz. This amounted to how many more people? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Oh, to be "High on the young Rhine"... If you ever hear the anthem of Liechtenstein, it may sound familiar as it carries the same tune as which of the following countries: Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Liechtenstein has been competing at the Olympic Games since 1936. In their first ten medals at the games, what discipline have they all been in? (think of where Liechtenstein is located, in terms of geography) Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. It is well-known that the chief export of Liechtenstein is false teeth. However, with more employees than citizens, Hilti is this landlocked country's largest employer. What do they make, ironically sounding? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Liechtenstein is divided into two major political regions which play a part in local politics and have historical relevance. What might the English translation of these two districts be? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. The highest point in Liechtenstein is the Grauspitz, a mountain peak in the Alps. The bank of what river is the lowest point? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Liechtenstein's National Day is August 15th, and has been celebrated as such since 1940. Strangely enough, which of the following events is NOT a reason that Liechtensteiners celebrate this day? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The tiny country is not only landlocked, it's doubly-landlocked. What is the nearest body of water to Liechtenstein?

Answer: Adriatic Sea

Doubly-landlocked, meaning, you would have to pass over two other countries to reach an open body of water, Liechtenstein shares that distinction with only one other country in the world - Uzbekistan. Surrounded by two landlocked countries, Switzerland and Austria, Liechtenstein's main body of water is the Rhine River.

Only slightly closer to Venice than it is to Genoa, Liechtenstein is closer to the Adriatic Sea than it is to the Ligurian Sea. Farther still from the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay, Liechtenstein is dependent on other countries for its shipping.
2. Interestingly, Liechtenstein came into existence as its own region in 1699 due to what event?

Answer: Sale

The princes of Liechtenstein wanted a seat and a say at the Imperial Council of Princes of the Holy Roman Empire, and the territory of Schellenberg was up for sale. In 1699, the land was sold and occupied by the princes, who gave their name to the land.

As the land was very small, the neighbouring region of Vaduz was bought thirteen years later to quadruple the land area. In 1719, the two regions were officially unified and the principality of Liechtenstein came into existence. According to Walter S.G. Kohn, "the way Liechtenstein came into existence is unique. [...] There were no historic necessities which pressed for the unification of a state and the wishes of the population did not enter into the picture at all."
3. Liechtenstein is sometimes referred to as the "canton that got away", meaning, that it ought to have been under Swiss governing. Was Liechtenstein ever a part of Switzerland?

Answer: No

Though the Swiss supply Liechtenstein with an army, and a rail service, and a postal service, and money, and a football (soccer) league, cheese and Toblerones, Liechtenstein has never been a part of Switzerland. The confusion dates back to 1949. That was when Liechtenstein was applying for member status in the United Nations. The main objection against their application came from the Ukrainian delegate (remember, back then it was an S.S.R., not today's Ukraine) who stated that Liechtenstein might as well be a canton of Switzerland. The application was approved, however, and the members of the Soviet bloc abstained when it was put to a vote.

Wait, wait! How dare I attribute the rail service to the Swiss! It's clearly run by the Lie... er, Austrians.
4. Some might know that the capital of Liechtenstein is Vaduz, but few know that the largest city in the country is Schaan. In 2015-16, the population of Schaan was nearly 11% larger than in Vaduz. This amounted to how many more people?

Answer: about 600

The entire country of Liechtenstein had about 38 thousand people in 2017. That's fewer than many towns around where I live. Vaduz, the capital, had 5407 people living in it at the official census at the end of 2016. Neighbouring Schaan had, in 2015, just fewer than 6000 people. I wouldn't go as far as to categorize these as two sprawling metropolises; nevertheless, they do provide financial and political stability for the rest of the country.
5. Oh, to be "High on the young Rhine"... If you ever hear the anthem of Liechtenstein, it may sound familiar as it carries the same tune as which of the following countries:

Answer: United Kingdom

"Oben am jungen Rhein" is the national anthem of Liechtenstein and has been since 1920. It was written by Jakob Josef Jauch, a pastor from Switzerland, and contained lyrics that spoke of the beauty of the Rhine at a time when German claims west of the river were all contested by the French. Songs written in German all pointed to the beauty of the land and the German claims to the region.

The current lyrics to the anthem have removed Christian religious and German nationalistic verses, and the tune was set to "God Save the King". At the time, it was not the only country to have their anthem to that tune, however, by the 21st century, it was the only other national anthem to still carry it, other than the United Kingdom, of course.
6. Liechtenstein has been competing at the Olympic Games since 1936. In their first ten medals at the games, what discipline have they all been in? (think of where Liechtenstein is located, in terms of geography)

Answer: Alpine skiing

Hanni Wenzel won Liechtenstein's first ever Olympic medal at the 1976 Winter Games at Innsbruck (of course, she did not have that far to go to compete...). She was a champion Alpine skier and won two golds and a silver in the 1980 Winter Games at Lake Placid. Her brother, Andreas, also won a silver medal at that time, and another bronze medal in the 1984 Sarajevo Games. To keep the family tradition alive, her daughter, Tina Weirather, won a bronze medal in the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Games, narrowly missing a second podium finish by 0.16 seconds. Seven medals, one family, impressive.

Liechtenstein, sitting in the Eastern Alps, has won its first ten Olympic medals in Alpine skiing. Per capita, this made Liechtenstein the most successful nation in Olympic history.
7. It is well-known that the chief export of Liechtenstein is false teeth. However, with more employees than citizens, Hilti is this landlocked country's largest employer. What do they make, ironically sounding?

Answer: Anchors

Ok, ok, before you go and yell at me (again), when I say that Hilti makes anchors, I mean that the company manufactures construction anchors, as in, things that screw into a concrete slab, perhaps, and allow you to attach stuff to it, securely. Hilti is a construction company and they also make drills and drill bits, power tools, and saws, to name a few products. They are very successful, and have offices outside of Liechtenstein as well.

The company is based in Schaan and, according to their website, employed more than 27,000 people in 2018. That's nearly as many people as the entire country it is based in, though, to be fair, most of them work outside of Liechtenstein.

In 2018, Liechtenstein also exported the aforementioned dentures, stamps, chemicals and vehicular parts. This is fascinating, as there are very few local resources to use in manufacturing. They imported many raw materials and food for the citizens to eat, but made enough money off of their exports to not have any national debt. Consequently, countries like Austria, Germany and the United States are in debt to this tiny principality.
8. Liechtenstein is divided into two major political regions which play a part in local politics and have historical relevance. What might the English translation of these two districts be?

Answer: Upper and lower land.

Wahlkreis Unterland and Wahlkreis Oberland might be in English the lower and upper land respectively, but, in a country as small as Liechtenstein, such a division is mainly for the local elections and the allocation of the representatives in the Landtag, the legislative branch of the government.

Unterland is the more northern of the two districts, and smaller, taking up about 20% of the land area of the entire country. This was originally the land of Schellenberg and was the original property bought by the princes of Liechtenstein. In the Landtag, the region is given ten representatives. Oberland was the region of Vaduz, and is larger and more populous. It contains the cities of Vaduz and Schaan and is allocated fifteen representatives.
9. The highest point in Liechtenstein is the Grauspitz, a mountain peak in the Alps. The bank of what river is the lowest point?

Answer: Rhine

The western border of the principality is the Rhine river. At its northern point, in the town of Ruggell, is the lowest point of the river as it empties to the north. At that point, about 430m above sea level, is the country's lowest point. Most of the country, however, is mountainous, as it is dominated by the eastern Alps. The Grauspitz sits approximately 2599m above sea level.

Liechtenstein has only one natural lake, Gampriner Seele, and it was formed in 1927 when the Rhine flooded and caused a large erosion of its banks. The resultant lake sits very near the current path of the Rhine. Excessive water drainage causing erosion leading to rock falls is a danger in Liechtenstein. To combat this, a series of canals was built (or extended from other countries) in the country to manage the water flow and to make the country safer. The largest canal is the Binnenkanal, and along with the Samina River and the Spiersbach, help drain the excess water flow, especially Spring snow melting off of the Alpine peaks.
10. Liechtenstein's National Day is August 15th, and has been celebrated as such since 1940. Strangely enough, which of the following events is NOT a reason that Liechtensteiners celebrate this day?

Answer: Independence as a Principality

Surprisingly, the national holiday of Liechtenstein has nothing to do with its independence. The unification between Vaduz and Schellenberg happened on January 23rd, 1718, but, seriously, who wants to be outside watching fireworks in an Alpine country in the middle of the winter?

In Liechtenstein, a banking holiday was already held every August 15th to coincide with the Feast of the Assumption. Seeing as how August 16th was Prince Franz-Josef II's birthday, it was decided to combine these two events into one long celebration. Even after the Prince's death in 1989, August 15th was still celebrated as the national holiday and was enacted as the official holiday in 1990.

On this day all of the residents of Liechtenstein are invited to Castle Vaduz for food, drinks, music, and fireworks. In 2005, Prince Hans-Adam II decided to pass on powers to his son, Alois, as a transition of power, and the 15th of August was symbolically decided as the day to do this.
Source: Author LeoDaVinci

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