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Quiz about American History by Decade The 1920s
Quiz about American History by Decade The 1920s

American History by Decade: The 1920s Quiz


It's the Jazz Age where you might see Al Capone doing the Charleston on top of a flag pole while playing mahjong. How much do you know about the 1920s?

A multiple-choice quiz by LIBGOV. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
LIBGOV
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
400,395
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
449
Last 3 plays: Guest 107 (2/10), ScreaminCoyote (8/10), Guest 96 (0/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. In the 1920 presidential election, Republican Senator Warren Harding of Ohio delivered a landslide victory over Democratic Governor James Cox (also from Ohio!). What was unique about the election of 1920? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Which annual event, started as a publicity stunt to bring tourists to the Atlantic City boardwalk, begins in September 1920? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. The Teapot Dome scandal was to discredit the Harding Presidency in the eyes of historians. What was Teapot Dome? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. In August 1923, President Harding died of a heart attack in San Francisco, and his vice president, Calvin Coolidge took over. Who are the other U.S. Presidents who died of natural causes while in office? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. In 1924, what frighteningly powerful super bureaucrat was appointed to the head of the organization he is to lead for the next 47 years? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. In the presidential election of 1924, incumbent Republican Calvin Coolidge handily defeated Democrat John Davis. Who was the candidate of the Progressive Party, nicknamed "Fighting Bob", who only won his home state of Wisconsin in the election? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. In July 1925 the Scopes Monkey Trial begins in Dayton, Tennessee when high school teacher John Scopes is tried for illegally teaching evolution in a public school. What was the outcome of the case? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. It's the jazz age! Which musician, generally regarded as the central figure of Jazz music, records several masterpieces in November 1925 at the Okeh studios in Chicago with his band, the Hot Five? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Incumbent Republican Calvin Coolidge decided not to run for re-election in 1928. Instead, the Republicans nominated Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover who defeated Democrat Al Smith, Governor of New York in another Republican landslide. What was special about Al Smith? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. On October 28, 1929, the New York Stock exchange experiences its largest single day loss up to that time. What is the nickname for this day that ushered in the Great Depression? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Feb 08 2024 : Guest 107: 2/10
Feb 05 2024 : ScreaminCoyote: 8/10
Jan 22 2024 : Guest 96: 0/10
Jan 20 2024 : Guest 107: 5/10
Jan 15 2024 : Guest 174: 7/10
Jan 05 2024 : Limecity: 7/10
Jan 02 2024 : Guest 24: 7/10

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In the 1920 presidential election, Republican Senator Warren Harding of Ohio delivered a landslide victory over Democratic Governor James Cox (also from Ohio!). What was unique about the election of 1920?

Answer: The first presidential election in which women could vote

The 19th Amendment allowing women the right to vote had passed Congress in 1919. Harding won popular vote 60% to 34% which is the largest margin in U.S. Presidential election history.
2. Which annual event, started as a publicity stunt to bring tourists to the Atlantic City boardwalk, begins in September 1920?

Answer: The Miss America Pageant

The Pageant was scheduled for the weekend after Labor Day in order to encourage summer tourists to stay in Atlantic City an extra week. In the original Miss America, eight East Coast cities sent a contestant, and Miss Washington, D.C. won the $100 first prize.
3. The Teapot Dome scandal was to discredit the Harding Presidency in the eyes of historians. What was Teapot Dome?

Answer: An oil field in Wyoming

Albert Fall, Harding's Secretary of the Interior, had taken bribes from two oil companies in order to grant them the lease to the Teapot Dome oil field without going through competitive bidding. Fall was convicted of conspiracy and bribery, and was the first sitting U.S. Cabinet member to be sent to jail.
4. In August 1923, President Harding died of a heart attack in San Francisco, and his vice president, Calvin Coolidge took over. Who are the other U.S. Presidents who died of natural causes while in office?

Answer: Zachary Taylor, Franklin Roosevelt, and William Henry Harrison

William Henry Harrison died of pneumonia in 1841, Zachary Taylor died of indigestion in 1850, and Franklin Roosevelt died of a cerebral hemorrhage in 1945. Harding's wife Florence refused to allow an autopsy after his death leading to accusations in the 1930s that she had poisoned him.
5. In 1924, what frighteningly powerful super bureaucrat was appointed to the head of the organization he is to lead for the next 47 years?

Answer: J. Edgar Hoover

J. Edgar Hoover was appointed the director of what was to become the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) when he was only 29. Hoover and his "G-men" fought the bank robbers in the 1930s and the Reds in the 1950s. Hoover is infamous for using his power to illegally amass secret files on prominent Americans.
6. In the presidential election of 1924, incumbent Republican Calvin Coolidge handily defeated Democrat John Davis. Who was the candidate of the Progressive Party, nicknamed "Fighting Bob", who only won his home state of Wisconsin in the election?

Answer: Robert M. La Follette

The 1924 election marked the high tide of conservatism in the United States with both the Republican and Democratic candidates favoring low tax, pro-business policies. Left-wing "Fighting Bob" La Follette had served as both Governor and U.S. Senator from Wisconsin as a progressive Republican.

A 1982 survey of historians named La Follette (tied with Henry Clay) as the greatest senators in U.S. History.
7. In July 1925 the Scopes Monkey Trial begins in Dayton, Tennessee when high school teacher John Scopes is tried for illegally teaching evolution in a public school. What was the outcome of the case?

Answer: Scopes was found guilty and fined $100

In March 1925, the ACLU had offered to defend anyone accused of teaching evolution in violation of Tennessee law. Legal heavyweights William Jennings Bryan (prosecution) and Clarence Darrow (defense) were the attorneys in the famous case. The verdict was eventually thrown out on a legal technicality (the amount of the fine had been set by the judge rather than the jury).
8. It's the jazz age! Which musician, generally regarded as the central figure of Jazz music, records several masterpieces in November 1925 at the Okeh studios in Chicago with his band, the Hot Five?

Answer: Louis Armstrong

Louis Armstrong's career lasted from the 1920s to the 1970s. The Hot Five versions of "Heebie Jeebies" "Potato Head Blues" and particularly "West End Blues" are considered to be among the greatest jazz recordings of all time.
9. Incumbent Republican Calvin Coolidge decided not to run for re-election in 1928. Instead, the Republicans nominated Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover who defeated Democrat Al Smith, Governor of New York in another Republican landslide. What was special about Al Smith?

Answer: He was the first Catholic to be nominated for president by a major party

Smith's Catholicism, thick New York accent, and urban theme song ("Sidewalks of New York") were big turn-offs to rural voters. Although Smith's candidacy was a failure, it was the first time that urban blue collar workers and Catholics (who became the backbone of FDR's coalition) voted majority Democratic.
10. On October 28, 1929, the New York Stock exchange experiences its largest single day loss up to that time. What is the nickname for this day that ushered in the Great Depression?

Answer: Black Monday

Rampant buying of stocks on credit led to a bubble that eventually exploded. The crash caused passage of the Glass-Steagall Act the next year which separated commercial banks from investment banks.
Source: Author LIBGOV

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