Quiz about Old Fogeyisms
Quiz about Old Fogeyisms

Old Fogeyisms Trivia Quiz


If you know these terms then you know fogeys. If, like the author of this quiz, you use these terms, then perhaps...you too are a...

A multiple-choice quiz by uglybird. Estimated time: 3 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Humanities Trivia
  6. »
  7. Varieties of English
  8. »
  9. American Slang

Author
uglybird
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
182,494
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
9 / 10
Plays
17419
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: CaJiPaDo (9/10), PhNurse (10/10), cms4613 (8/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. The old fellow crawling along ahead of you thinks his old Nash Rambler is pretty snazzy. You think he is an old fuddy duddy. How would you characterize a "fuddy-duddy"? Hint

Old fashioned and resistant to change
Dimwitted and biddable
Heartless and unfeeling
Opinionated and inflexible

2. You can't "keep your shirt on" and have a "hollow leg". What is your problem? Hint

Scruffiness and petty thievery
Immodesty and stinginess
Impatience and a voracious appetite for food or drink
Mental slowness and clumsiness

3. An old fogey exclaims, "Hotdog!" What could she or he mean? Hint

Either "Wow" or "What a show off" depending on context
Always "What a show off" never "wow"
Always "Wow" never "what a show off"
Neither "Wow!" nor "what a show off"

4. Are these questions making you a titch discombobulated? If you were "just a titch discombobulated", what would you be feeling? Hint

Very angry
Confused, but just a smidgeon
Tickled pink
Mildly euphoric

5. If the old fuddy-duddy says something is "piddly", what is it? Hint

Gross and smelly
Just silly
Confusing and arcane
Small, insignificant

6. My folks always warned me not to "dilly-dally", but sometimes I did. Which of the following was the most likely consequence of my dilly-dallying? Hint

Barking up the wrong tree
Looking like a doofus
Making the family late for church
Getting on my high horse

7. I was frequently told not to be any of the following (usually at times when I was undeniably being one). But which of these words has a meaning least like the other three? Hint

Cocky
Numbskull
Nitwit
Doofus

8. There was a word we used to employ to mean that a person was out of date and not cool. Now I suspect that using that word in that fashion means you're out of date and not cool. The word is also a shape. To which word am I referring?

Answer: (Four sides)
9. If a fogey's situation is "dicey", which of the following best describes the fogey's circumstances? Hint

Hilarious
Hopeful
Hackneyed
Hazardous

10. Things are "hunky dory". Which of the following is most likely to be a description of your mood? Hint

Under the gun
Cracker jack
In the doldrums
Under the weather


(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The old fellow crawling along ahead of you thinks his old Nash Rambler is pretty snazzy. You think he is an old fuddy duddy. How would you characterize a "fuddy-duddy"?

Answer: Old fashioned and resistant to change

The origin of "fuddy-duddy" has not been confidently established. It first appears in published writings in the early 20th century. I remember it as the phrase my father used to describe the old, slow drivers ahead of him on the long hill up to our house.
2. You can't "keep your shirt on" and have a "hollow leg". What is your problem?

Answer: Impatience and a voracious appetite for food or drink

I was often told, "keep your shirt on" and informed that I "must have a hollow leg" as I grew up. I am unable to determine the origin of the expression "hollow leg". I do know that the hollow space can be filled with either alcoholic beverages or with food. Please inform me if you know the origin.
3. An old fogey exclaims, "Hotdog!" What could she or he mean?

Answer: Either "Wow" or "What a show off" depending on context

"Hot dog!" before the 60s was an expression of delight. The "hotdog" of the 60s was an insufferable show off. This old fogey could be recalling either usage.
4. Are these questions making you a titch discombobulated? If you were "just a titch discombobulated", what would you be feeling?

Answer: Confused, but just a smidgeon

"Discombobulate" is thought to have derived from "decompose". Young fogeys often mistakenly pronounce the word "discomBOOBulate". Old fogeys never make that error. Titch may have originally been a term for a small child. "Smidgeon", like titch, refers to a very small amount.
5. If the old fuddy-duddy says something is "piddly", what is it?

Answer: Small, insignificant

If something is "piddly", it is small; but it is also likely to be trifling. Apparently "piffling", British slang term, is equivalent to "piddling".
6. My folks always warned me not to "dilly-dally", but sometimes I did. Which of the following was the most likely consequence of my dilly-dallying?

Answer: Making the family late for church

"Folks" is fogey-speak for parents. "Dilly" may have derived from "delightful". I still find dallying delightful.

"What love? Time to go? All right. I'll come as soon as I finish this quiz question."
7. I was frequently told not to be any of the following (usually at times when I was undeniably being one). But which of these words has a meaning least like the other three?

Answer: Cocky

"Doof" is Scots for "fool". "Nit" is apparently from the Middle High German "niht" meaning "nothing"; "brainless" is therefore a near synonym for "nitwit". "Numbskull" speaks for itself.
8. There was a word we used to employ to mean that a person was out of date and not cool. Now I suspect that using that word in that fashion means you're out of date and not cool. The word is also a shape. To which word am I referring?

Answer: Square

I remember that when I recited that Cub Scout's pledge I promised, "to be square and obey the law of the pack". Little did I know that I was uttering prophecy!
9. If a fogey's situation is "dicey", which of the following best describes the fogey's circumstances?

Answer: Hazardous

"Dicey" derives from "dice". It refers to perilous situations and expects a poor outcome.
10. Things are "hunky dory". Which of the following is most likely to be a description of your mood?

Answer: Cracker jack

"Hunky dory" has been in use since at least the 1860's. It may have originally referred to being on "home base" while playing childhood games. If very many of these words are in your everyday vocabulary, you may want to consider joining FunTrivia's "Fogeys" group.
Source: Author uglybird

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Bruyere before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Most Recent Scores
Dec 01 2022 : CaJiPaDo: 9/10
Nov 29 2022 : PhNurse: 10/10
Nov 28 2022 : cms4613: 8/10
Nov 27 2022 : Guest 75: 8/10
Nov 25 2022 : zorba_scank: 10/10
Nov 24 2022 : Guest 24: 10/10
Nov 23 2022 : Guest 98: 10/10
Nov 23 2022 : Guest 96: 10/10
Nov 22 2022 : Guest 172: 9/10

Score Distribution

quiz
12/3/2022, Copyright 2022 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us