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Quiz about Ten Clues to Ten Treasures
Quiz about Ten Clues to Ten Treasures

Ten Clues to Ten Treasures Trivia Quiz


Norman Rockwell bequeathed us a treasure trove. Here are ten of the 322 pictures that were featured as "The Saturday Evening Post" covers. Rockwell didn't name his paintings, so I have tried to use the "popular" names.

A multiple-choice quiz by mlcmlc. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
mlcmlc
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
340,765
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
933
Last 3 plays: jonnowales (7/10), Guest 99 (5/10), slay01 (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Rockwell's first cover for "The Saturday Evening Post" was published on May 20, 1916. The picture is of three boys. Two of the boys are dressed for baseball with caps and glove. The third is very unhappy boy in his finest clothes with a bottle in his pocket and a baby carriage to push. Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. "The Saturday Evening Post" published this Rockwell cover in 1929. The picture depicts a girl who has brought her sickly baby (doll) to the doctor for a cure. The doctor, sitting in front of his work desk and with his black bag at his feet, is listening to the doll's heart with his stethoscope. Which cover might this be? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. On April 3, 1943, "The Saturday Evening Post" published an April Fools' Day cover that Rockwell had painted. The picture portrays a couple playing a board game. Which of these would be the title of that painting? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. During World War II, eleven paintings detailing a soldier's life were created. The last of these Rockwell pictures was published on "The Saturday Evening Post" cover in 1946, the subject, Willie Gillis, now home and safe. Which of these was the last of the series? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. In April 1946, "The Saturday Evening Post" published one of Rockwell's most recognizable pictures. Two women with their cleaning tools around them, are reading a playbill in a deserted theatre. Which of these fits that description? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. The Rockwell cover of "The Saturday Evening Post" on April 29, 1950 was of a group of musicians playing in the back room, probably after a hard day's work. Which of these paintings would that be? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. On January 3, 1953, just after the holiday season, "The Saturday Evening Post" published a Rockwell picture of an overweight man, surrounded by tempting dishes. He sits in a bakery with cakes filling the shelves while he eats a plate of vegetables and reads "How to Diet". Which of these pictures fits that description? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. In this 1953 cover for "The Saturday Evening Post" Rockwell turned again to a theme with a child. A disheveled girl child sits on the bench by the principal's door. Her shirt is untucked, her hair awry, one shoe untied, socks falling, and a huge grin. Which other feature is also mentioned in the title? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. For the February 14, 1959, cover for "The Saturday Evening Post", Rockwell portrayed a room with eleven men and one woman in disagreement. The room is littered with paper and the smoke haze is heavy. What scene does this depict?

Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. In January of 1962, "The Saturday Evening Post" published what is now a famous Rockwell picture. A dapper man is viewing a large piece of art, perhaps on a museum wall. Which of these would that be? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Apr 13 2024 : jonnowales: 7/10
Mar 25 2024 : Guest 99: 5/10
Mar 19 2024 : slay01: 10/10
Feb 29 2024 : Trufflesss: 9/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Rockwell's first cover for "The Saturday Evening Post" was published on May 20, 1916. The picture is of three boys. Two of the boys are dressed for baseball with caps and glove. The third is very unhappy boy in his finest clothes with a bottle in his pocket and a baby carriage to push.

Answer: Boy with Baby Carriage

Rockwell had gone to the art editor with two paintings, both of which were purchased for covers. The second, "The Circus Barker and the Strongman", was published on June 3, 1916. Thus began his career as a cover artist for "The Saturday Evening Post".

Until 1926, the "Post" covers were done with two colors, typically black and then red.
2. "The Saturday Evening Post" published this Rockwell cover in 1929. The picture depicts a girl who has brought her sickly baby (doll) to the doctor for a cure. The doctor, sitting in front of his work desk and with his black bag at his feet, is listening to the doll's heart with his stethoscope. Which cover might this be?

Answer: Doctor and Doll

Rockwell painted another "Doctor and Doll" picture in 1942, though it was not a "Post" cover. The 1942 picture portrays the doctor measuring the doll's pulse, rather than listening to a heartbeat. Rockwell painted many pictures with a health focus, such as "Before the Shot", "Doctor and Boy Looking at Thermometer", "Girl in Sick Bed", etc.
3. On April 3, 1943, "The Saturday Evening Post" published an April Fools' Day cover that Rockwell had painted. The picture portrays a couple playing a board game. Which of these would be the title of that painting?

Answer: April Fool: Checkers

Rockwell painted three April Fools' Day covers for the "Post". The second was "April Fool: Fishing" in 1945, and the third was "April Fool: Girl with Shopkeeper" in 1948. The story goes that the first was painted as a response to all of the mails he received from folk about the errors in his paintings, so these paintings were filled with as many errors as he could imagine. How many can you find?
4. During World War II, eleven paintings detailing a soldier's life were created. The last of these Rockwell pictures was published on "The Saturday Evening Post" cover in 1946, the subject, Willie Gillis, now home and safe. Which of these was the last of the series?

Answer: Willie Gillis In College

Many did not realize that Willie Gillis was a fictional character and sent mails to the "Post" asking for updates on him. Bob Buck was the model used for this series. When Buck enlisted and was sent to the South Seas, Rockwell used memory and photographs to create the paintings without a model.
5. In April 1946, "The Saturday Evening Post" published one of Rockwell's most recognizable pictures. Two women with their cleaning tools around them, are reading a playbill in a deserted theatre. Which of these fits that description?

Answer: Charwomen In Theatre

Once again Rockwell captured an everyday scene and focused it for our attention. These women are cleaning the theatre after the audience has departed and are stopping just for a moment to look at the Playbill.
6. The Rockwell cover of "The Saturday Evening Post" on April 29, 1950 was of a group of musicians playing in the back room, probably after a hard day's work. Which of these paintings would that be?

Answer: Shuffleton's Barbershop

When I went to a Rockwell exhibit, this was the painting that struck me the most. First, the use of fore- (the window pane), medium- (the interior of the barbershop), and back-ground (the back room) are incredibly detailed. All of the light appears to come from the back room, with deep shadows in the remainder of the space. I felt like I could open the door and walk right in.
7. On January 3, 1953, just after the holiday season, "The Saturday Evening Post" published a Rockwell picture of an overweight man, surrounded by tempting dishes. He sits in a bakery with cakes filling the shelves while he eats a plate of vegetables and reads "How to Diet". Which of these pictures fits that description?

Answer: Baker Reading Diet Book

Yes, just after a holiday of feasting and overindulgence, the picture could be a reminder to eat better. You can't tell from the picture whether or not the cakes are a temptation, or in fact, how the baker gained the additional weight, but he's giving it a good try at turning over the new leaf!
8. In this 1953 cover for "The Saturday Evening Post" Rockwell turned again to a theme with a child. A disheveled girl child sits on the bench by the principal's door. Her shirt is untucked, her hair awry, one shoe untied, socks falling, and a huge grin. Which other feature is also mentioned in the title?

Answer: Girl With Black Eye

This is alternately called "The Shiner". Again, an amazing amount of detail from the bulletin board, the file cabinet, the tile floor, the reflections, etc. Can't tell whether she won or lost the fight, but the grin makes me think that the other fared worse.
9. For the February 14, 1959, cover for "The Saturday Evening Post", Rockwell portrayed a room with eleven men and one woman in disagreement. The room is littered with paper and the smoke haze is heavy. What scene does this depict?

Answer: The Jury

One juror seems to be sleeping. The rest of the men are patently trying to convince the woman to change her vote, and she's having none of it. Rockwell painted himself into many of his scenes and he is portrayed here as one of the jurors.
10. In January of 1962, "The Saturday Evening Post" published what is now a famous Rockwell picture. A dapper man is viewing a large piece of art, perhaps on a museum wall. Which of these would that be?

Answer: The Connoisseur

Rockwell called himself an illustrator. However, there have been many articles that basically stated that he was not as talented as some other "artists" that did not illustrate. Phooey, I say! Perhaps this one was to show that indeed he could paint modern art, but why?
Source: Author mlcmlc

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor looney_tunes before going online.
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