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Quiz about Theres No Spell More Magical Than Song
Quiz about Theres No Spell More Magical Than Song

There's No Spell More Magical Than Song Quiz


La Dee Dah, Hi-Lili-Hi-Lo... Some might argue that the titles of these songs make no sense, but they do sound almost like magic spells. So let's get our magic wands ready and take a look at a few other songs with (no) nonsense titles.

A multiple-choice quiz by Reynariki. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Reynariki
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
374,169
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
382
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. The title the first song on this list may actually not be total nonsense, but instead an expression in a foreign language. Which rather famous song, despite being recorded by one of the most popular rock bands of the twentieth century, was voted, maybe somewhat unfairly, the worst song of all time in an online poll by Mars Inc. in 2004? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. The title of the next song may be total balderdash, but it's hard to get it out of your head. "Da Doo Ron Ron" was one of the first and most notable examples of the use of the "Wall of Sound" production formula, developed by Phil Spector at Gold Star Studios. Which of the prominent "girl groups" of the 1960s performed this song in 1963? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. The title of this song makes so little sense that even its producers managed to mess it up upon the song's original release. This rather funny song, released by the one-hit wonder band The Edsels, tells us about meeting a girl with a very rare name (phonetically related to a certain South American camelid). Who was this girl, mentioned in the song title? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Shoo-Be-Da-Be... Shoo-Doo-Be... ah, "Shoo-Be-Doo-Be-Doo-Da-Day"! Now that's how you do a tongue-twister song title. This song was sung by Michael Jackson on his album "Ben", but who was the co-author and the original performer of this track? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The next song is a special entry on this list, both because its title is an actual magic spell and because not only the title, but the major part of its lyrics consist of made-up words. What is this song, sung by the Fairy Godmother in Disney's 1950 "Cinderella"?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. The next song with (no) nonsense title, although not the most famous single of this rather well-known Irish singer, still enjoyed moderate success in the UK and Ireland in the 1970s, when it was first released. In 2013, however, it was given a new life when its reworded version was used in a TV ad for the UK National Lottery. Which song is it? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. The title of the next song may be nonsensical, but it does feel a bit like family. Recorded by the The Rivingtons in the 1960s, what is the name of this novelty doo-wop song (later covered by The Beach Boys and The Freshmen)? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Phonetic cousins of a certain South American camelid are in high demand among the songwriters who like to experiment with nonsense song titles. Case in question - the song "Bama Lama Bama Loo", recorded by a prominent American artist noted for his hits "Tutti-Frutti" and "Long Tall Sally". What is his stage name? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Now for more tongue-twisters. Surprisingly, "Barabajagal" is not a fitting synonym for "balderdash", but the name of the seductive lover mentioned in the song "Goo Goo Barabajagal (Love Is Hot)". Which British singer-songwriter wrote and performed this song? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. We'll finish off with another (no) nonsense Disney entry. The title of his song may not make much sense, but if you listen to it, his luck will rub off on you. Which 1964 Disney film about a magical nanny featured the song "Chim Chim Cher-ee", sung by a very lucky chimney sweep?

Answer: (Two Words)

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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The title the first song on this list may actually not be total nonsense, but instead an expression in a foreign language. Which rather famous song, despite being recorded by one of the most popular rock bands of the twentieth century, was voted, maybe somewhat unfairly, the worst song of all time in an online poll by Mars Inc. in 2004?

Answer: "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da" - The Beatles

"Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da" was written by Paul McCartney and released by The Beatles as part of "The White Album" in 1968. It was not released as a single in the UK at that time, most probably due to the fact that the other three band members, especially John Lennon, disliked the song and were annoyed by McCartney's fascination with it (it took quite a few tries to make that recording). It had not been performed live by any of the Beatles until December 2009, when McCartney played it in Hamburg, Germany during his European tour.

The title of the song is based on the expression that Paul McCartney used to hear from an acquaintance of his, Nigerian conga player Jimmy Scott-Emuakpor - "Ob-la-di, ob-la-da, life goes on." According to some sources, the origin of the phrase "obladi, oblada" is in the common saying of the Yoruba tribe of Nigeria that actually translates to "life goes on".

Spell-check: "Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da" is a Cheering Spell.
2. The title of the next song may be total balderdash, but it's hard to get it out of your head. "Da Doo Ron Ron" was one of the first and most notable examples of the use of the "Wall of Sound" production formula, developed by Phil Spector at Gold Star Studios. Which of the prominent "girl groups" of the 1960s performed this song in 1963?

Answer: The Crystals

The "Wall of Sound" production formula called for the use of a large number of electric and acoustic instruments playing in unison, recorded in an echo chamber. The result was an avalanche of sound, very different from the majority of arrangements of the previous decades, where separate instruments were easily identifiable.

The song itself tells a simple story of a boy meets girl, and the nonsense syllables that make up the song title are just thrown in, in order not to distract the listener from the nature of sound and the main storyline.

Spell-check: "Da Doo Ron Ron" is an Infatuation Spell.
3. The title of this song makes so little sense that even its producers managed to mess it up upon the song's original release. This rather funny song, released by the one-hit wonder band The Edsels, tells us about meeting a girl with a very rare name (phonetically related to a certain South American camelid). Who was this girl, mentioned in the song title?

Answer: Rama Lama Ding Dong

Although the American doo-wop group The Edsels recorded a few other songs before releasing "Rama Lama Ding Dong", this track remains their most famous recording. It did not attract much attention upon its original US release in 1958 (it was even released under an incorrect title "Lama Rama Ding Dong"). However, in 1961, after a New York DJ began to play it as a segue from a doo-wop song "Blue Moon" by The Marcels, it gained popularity and later enjoyed some record chart success.

Spell-check: "Rama Lama Ding Dong" is a Laughing Spell.
4. Shoo-Be-Da-Be... Shoo-Doo-Be... ah, "Shoo-Be-Doo-Be-Doo-Da-Day"! Now that's how you do a tongue-twister song title. This song was sung by Michael Jackson on his album "Ben", but who was the co-author and the original performer of this track?

Answer: Stevie Wonder

Stevie Wonder co-wrote this song with Hank Cosby and Sylvia Moy in 1968. It was one of the most successful tracks of Stevie Wonder's 1960s Motown Period, reaching number nine on the "Billboard Hot 100" in 1968. It was also the first song in which Stevie Wonder demonstrated with talents at the clavinet.

Spell-check: "Shoo-Be-Doo-Be-Doo-Da-Day" is a Protection Spell.
5. The next song is a special entry on this list, both because its title is an actual magic spell and because not only the title, but the major part of its lyrics consist of made-up words. What is this song, sung by the Fairy Godmother in Disney's 1950 "Cinderella"?

Answer: Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo

In "Cinderella" this song was performed by Verna Felton, the actress who voiced the Fairy Godmother, herself. A few other artists have released recordings of this song, the version by Perry Como and The Fontane Sisters being arguably the most well-known, although the recording by Jo Stafford and Gordon MacRae also enjoyed some chart success.

This song has also been the subject of numerous parodies, such as the song "The Baby, the Bubbe, and You" by Mickey Katz and the parody of "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo" sung by Fiona's Fairy Godmother in "Shrek 2" (2004).

Spell-check: "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo" is a Transfiguration Spell.
6. The next song with (no) nonsense title, although not the most famous single of this rather well-known Irish singer, still enjoyed moderate success in the UK and Ireland in the 1970s, when it was first released. In 2013, however, it was given a new life when its reworded version was used in a TV ad for the UK National Lottery. Which song is it?

Answer: "Ooh-Wakka-Doo-Wakka-Day" - Gilbert O'Sullivan

"Ooh-Wakka-Doo-Wakka-Day" had only existed as a single up until 2012 when it was added to the remastered version of the album "Back to Front". The original lyrics of the song were meant to convey the idea of two people catching up on the events of each other's everyday lives, although quite a few of these events were described in an intentionally funny way: for example, the speaker proves that he is strong by saying that he "picked a needle up with one hand". In the version of the song recorded for the National Lottery, 300 people sang the reworded lyrics while going about their everyday lives.

Spell-check: "Ooh-Wakka-Doo-Wakka-Day" is a Confounding Spell.
7. The title of the next song may be nonsensical, but it does feel a bit like family. Recorded by the The Rivingtons in the 1960s, what is the name of this novelty doo-wop song (later covered by The Beach Boys and The Freshmen)?

Answer: Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow

"Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow" was the first hit single for The Rivingtons, the success that they tried to emulate in a few months from its release with two similar songs, "Mama-Oom-Mow-Mow (The Bird)" and "The Bird's the Word". They did not have much luck with the former, but the latter became the second hit for the group.

"The Bird's the Word" and "Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow" later formed the basis for the song "Surfin' Bird" by the rock band The Trashmen. Upon its release, this song did not credit The Rivingtons as the original writers - this situation was only remedied after The Trashmen were threatened with legal prosecution.

Spell-check: "Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow" is a Memory Spell.
8. Phonetic cousins of a certain South American camelid are in high demand among the songwriters who like to experiment with nonsense song titles. Case in question - the song "Bama Lama Bama Loo", recorded by a prominent American artist noted for his hits "Tutti-Frutti" and "Long Tall Sally". What is his stage name?

Answer: Little Richard

"Bama Lama Bama Loo" was not one of Little Richard's most successful singles - it never made it higher than number 86 on any of the US charts, although it did reach Top 20 in the UK. The song tells us about winning the heart of a girl called Lucinder who is known as "the great pretender". The phrase "bama lama, bama loo" is used extensively throughout the song to describe the essence of Lucinder's charm.

Spell-check: "Bama Lama Bama Loo" is an Illusion Spell.
9. Now for more tongue-twisters. Surprisingly, "Barabajagal" is not a fitting synonym for "balderdash", but the name of the seductive lover mentioned in the song "Goo Goo Barabajagal (Love Is Hot)". Which British singer-songwriter wrote and performed this song?

Answer: Donovan

Donovan recorded "Goo Goo Barabajagal (Love Is Hot)" together with The Jeff Beck Group, who provided instrumental backing for the track. The song tells a story of a girl falling in love with a mysterious and seductive seller of wild herbs, with the phrase "Goo goo, goo goo Barabajagal was his name now" repeated numerous times throughout the song.

Donovan mentioned that his inspiration for the title of the song was the phrase "goo goo ga joob" from The Beatles' song "I Am the Walrus".

Spell-check: "Goo Goo Barabajagal" is a Love Spell.
10. We'll finish off with another (no) nonsense Disney entry. The title of his song may not make much sense, but if you listen to it, his luck will rub off on you. Which 1964 Disney film about a magical nanny featured the song "Chim Chim Cher-ee", sung by a very lucky chimney sweep?

Answer: Mary Poppins

"Chim Chim Cher-ee" was originally performed by Dick Van Dyke and Julie Andrews. It appeared not only in the film version of "Mary Poppins", but also in the Cameron Mackintosh/Disney musical of the same name. In 1964, it won the Academy Award for Best Original Song, and in 2008, Julie Andrews selected it as one of her favorite Disney songs.

The authors of the song, Robert B. Sherman and Richard M. Sherman, explained that their inspiration for "Chim Chim Cher-ee" came from a drawing of a chimney-sweep by the "Mary Poppins'" screenwriter, Don DaGradi. The lyrics of the song stem from the idea present in British folklore that shaking hands with "sweeps" can bring good luck.

Spell-check: "Chim Chim Cher-ee" is a Good Luck Spell.
Source: Author Reynariki

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