Quiz about Wanna Be a Chef
Quiz about Wanna Be a Chef

Wanna Be a Chef? Trivia Quiz


These questions are drawn from the experiences of a culinary school student.

A multiple-choice quiz by ignotus999. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
ignotus999
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
364,082
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
515
Last 3 plays: Kankurette (10/10), emmal2000uk (3/10), Guest 136 (5/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Our budding chef's biggest challenge in culinary school was maintaining his "brigade." What's that? Hint

Knife set
Kitchen uniform
Sourdough (bread) starter
Self-esteem

2. Before he could work in the kitchen at school, our culinary student had to pass a rigorous course sponsored by the National Restaurant Association. What's it called? Hint

Basic Knife Skills ("BKS") (TM)
Equipment Cleaning and Maintenance ("ECM") (TM)
Personal Healh and Hygiene (TM)
ServSafe (TM)

3. Our culinary student always carried this item in a specially-designed pocket on the sleeve of his chef's coat, as he scurried about the kitchen. The instructor inspected it before each class. What's the vital widget? Hint

A calculator
A food thermometer
A paring knife
A hair net

4. One of the courses was entitled "Garde Manger." What did our culinary student most likely learn to do in this course? Hint

Bake bread
Watch the livestock
Prepare a terrine
Roast a turkey

5. In his basic wine course, our culinary student learned to look for legs, curtains and church windows. What do they indicate? Hint

The guest is intoxicated
High(er) alcohol content
The wine has gone bad
The wine glass has water spots

6. In his first course on recipes, our culinary student learned there were five basic flavors. Four of them (sweet, sour, salty and bitter) have been recognized for centuries. The fifth one was scientifically identified in the 20th century. What is it? Hint

Porcine
Fruity
Umami
Pungent (Piquant)

7. One of our culinary student's first jobs in school was as the "plongeur." It's unpleasant but necessary, and everyone took their turn. What did he do in this position? Hint

Unclogged the drains
Made broth
Gutted fish
Washed the dishes

8. Our aspiring chef and his comrades were "Communards" during their student days. How so? Hint

They cooked for the staff and students
They were members of the Culinary Students Union
They wore red berets in the kitchen
They ate from a communal stewpot

9. A restaurant offered our aspiring chef a job as a tournant - after graduation, of course. What would he be doing? Hint

Decorating platters
Cleaning fish
Visiting farms and suppliers
Everything and anything in the kitchen

10. Our budding chef had to "stage" at a fine restaurant before being considered for a job. That's pronounced "stazhje," not stage as in theater. They didn't pay him, either. What did they make the poor lad do? Hint

Scrub the pots and pans
Wait tables - no tips
Take out the garbage
Watch the chef at work


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Our budding chef's biggest challenge in culinary school was maintaining his "brigade." What's that?

Answer: Kitchen uniform

"Brigade de cuisine" is a heirarchical system for kitchen personnel, developed by Georges Escoffier in the late 19th century. The system involves "chef's hats" of varying height. Today, it's also a synonym for the kitchen uniform: in our student's case, a sparkling white jacket, floppy white tocque, checkered pants and highly polished shoes.

It all had to be perfectly clean, every day. Apron? Hah!
2. Before he could work in the kitchen at school, our culinary student had to pass a rigorous course sponsored by the National Restaurant Association. What's it called?

Answer: ServSafe (TM)

ServSafe is a trademark of the US National Restaurant Association for its food service training programs. The Food Handler certification is required at many culinary schools. The certification or an equivalent is also required by many states and localities.

In addition to food handling, the NRA offers courses in management, alcoholic beverage service, and food allergens - but not target shooting.
3. Our culinary student always carried this item in a specially-designed pocket on the sleeve of his chef's coat, as he scurried about the kitchen. The instructor inspected it before each class. What's the vital widget?

Answer: A food thermometer

Food safety - and flavor and texture - depend on accurate temperature measurement. The students sometimes carry other items like pens and timers, but the instant-read food thermometer is an absolute requirement.
4. One of the courses was entitled "Garde Manger." What did our culinary student most likely learn to do in this course?

Answer: Prepare a terrine

The French term "garde manger" literally means "food keeper." It's really a refrigerated case or area where cold foods are prepared and stored - such as salads, cheeses, cold appetizers, pates (food, not bald heads) and terrines. The garde manger staff may also create ice carvings and lard sculptures. Seriously. Lard doesn't melt so fast. It's covered in an advanced course.
5. In his basic wine course, our culinary student learned to look for legs, curtains and church windows. What do they indicate?

Answer: High(er) alcohol content

After taking a sip - please don't chug - a ring of wine may form at the top of the glass. Droplets may then move back down the side of the glass. With a bit of imagination, the droplet streams look like legs, or curtains, or stained glass windows. Alcohol has a lower surface tension than water.

The higher the alcohol content of the wine, the more likely you will see this phenomenon, and perhaps others as well. It's not related to the quality of the wine, but it makes for interesting table conversation.
6. In his first course on recipes, our culinary student learned there were five basic flavors. Four of them (sweet, sour, salty and bitter) have been recognized for centuries. The fifth one was scientifically identified in the 20th century. What is it?

Answer: Umami

Umami is a mild flavor that promotes salivation and stimulates the tongue and mouth. It derives from the chemical substance glutamate. While "pure" umami is unpalatable, it enhances the flavors of other foods. Umami was identified in 1908 by Japanese chemist Kikunae Ikeda, who named it with the Japanese word for "pleasant savory taste." Umami is found in seaweed, some shellfish, cured meats, green tea, fermented fish sauce - and human breast milk.
7. One of our culinary student's first jobs in school was as the "plongeur." It's unpleasant but necessary, and everyone took their turn. What did he do in this position?

Answer: Washed the dishes

Washing dishes and cooking vessels is usually the job of the plongeur. A lucky Plongeur in a large kitchen may have a subordinate Marmiton, who washes the pots and pans. Even in modern kitchens, this task isn't completely automated.
8. Our aspiring chef and his comrades were "Communards" during their student days. How so?

Answer: They cooked for the staff and students

Communards prepare meals for the kitchen / restaurant staff - who have to eat too. The meals are typically not "leftovers": a restaurant kitchen with prepared but unsold food is wasteful. Unsold baked goods are less of an issue. Since the staff work during normal meal hours, their food is usually prepared quickly and served at odd times. And yes, sometimes they order pizza.
9. A restaurant offered our aspiring chef a job as a tournant - after graduation, of course. What would he be doing?

Answer: Everything and anything in the kitchen

The official term is "chef de tournant" - someone who can handle all of the stations in the kitchen, and moves from one to another as needed. It's hectic, but he'd get a taller hat, er, tocque.
10. Our budding chef had to "stage" at a fine restaurant before being considered for a job. That's pronounced "stazhje," not stage as in theater. They didn't pay him, either. What did they make the poor lad do?

Answer: Watch the chef at work

The word comes from the French "stagiaire" meaning apprentice. It may also involve some basic kitchen work, or attempting to duplicate the chef's techniques. It's sometimes called "trailing," but that sounds less exotic. In the United States, staging may last only few days - until the chef decides whether you can cut it without cutting your fingers.
Source: Author ignotus999

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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Most Recent Scores
Jan 18 2023 : Kankurette: 10/10
Dec 28 2022 : emmal2000uk: 3/10
Dec 06 2022 : Guest 136: 5/10

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