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Quiz about My Word  Common Sayings from the Bible  2
Quiz about My Word  Common Sayings from the Bible  2

My Word -- Common Sayings from the Bible -- #2 Quiz


It might come as a surprise to some that many of the common sayings we use today originate from the Bible. How much do you know about the sayings? This is my second installment. (Different versions of the Bible were used for this quiz.)

A multiple-choice quiz by Cowrofl. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
Cowrofl
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
331,124
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
2287
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. Timothy was a young worker in the early church and two different books, or letters, in the New Testament are addressed to him. Who urged Timothy to 'fight the good fight' in both the KJV and the NIV Bibles? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. 'Three score and ten' is an old English term that appears in the King James Bible. In what book in the Old Testament do you find the term? (Hint: it appears in the 90th chapter of the book.)
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. 'From sea to sea' is the motto of a country that officially calls itself a dominion. The people of this country might be surprised to learn the term 'from sea to sea' was taken from Psalm 72:8 where it states "He shall have dominion from sea unto sea." What country has this motto? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Luke was a doctor and it should not come as a surprise that the term 'physician heal thyself' appears in the Gospel he is credited with writing. Who spoke the words 'physician heal thyself', which are now part of a common expression? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Living off 'the fat of the land' is a phrase that appears in Genesis 45:18 in the Old Testament. Who used the term 'the fat of the land' in a conversation with Joseph?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. 'Let he who is without sin cast the first stone' was a term used by Jesus in John 8:7. What was the particular incident in which he spoke the words?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. 'Eat, drink, and be merry' is another common expression that comes from the Bible with the actual wording in the King James Version stating "eat, drink and be glad." In what book in the Old Testament would you find the phrase?

Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. 'An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth' is a saying that appears in two different places in the Old Testament and in Matthew 5:38. Who used the phrase in Matthew? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. 'The root of the matter' is a common saying found in Job 19:28 in the King James Version. Who used the term?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. 'Forbidden fruit' is a term that is derived from the Old Testament, specifically Genesis 2:17 and Genesis 3:3. What does the term refer to in the Old Testament? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Timothy was a young worker in the early church and two different books, or letters, in the New Testament are addressed to him. Who urged Timothy to 'fight the good fight' in both the KJV and the NIV Bibles?

Answer: Paul

'Fight the good fight', a common saying in today's English, comes from Paul's letter to Timothy. The term appears in 1 Timothy 1:18 and 1 Timothy 6:12. And in 2 Timothy 4:7, Paul states he has 'fought the good fight'. Many theologians believe Paul wrote 2 Timothy just prior to his execution. In other words, the apostle to the Gentiles was correct in suggesting his fight had come to an end.
2. 'Three score and ten' is an old English term that appears in the King James Bible. In what book in the Old Testament do you find the term? (Hint: it appears in the 90th chapter of the book.)

Answer: The Psalms

The Psalms is the correct answer with the phrase coming from the 10th verse of Psalm 90. According to Answers.com, the term 'three score and ten' is found in only the KJV of the Bible simply because it is an old English term. 'Three score and ten', of course, refers to 70 years with a score being equivalent to 20 years.
3. 'From sea to sea' is the motto of a country that officially calls itself a dominion. The people of this country might be surprised to learn the term 'from sea to sea' was taken from Psalm 72:8 where it states "He shall have dominion from sea unto sea." What country has this motto?

Answer: Canada

The correct answer is Canada. In the Great White North, the term 'from sea to sea' is a common expression and has been used for everything from the title of a history book to promotional clips by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. It was selected as the country's motto, reflecting the fact the Dominion of Canada stretches from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean. Today, however, Canadians more often use the term 'from sea to sea to sea,' acknowledging the fact the dominion also stretches to the Arctic Ocean.
4. Luke was a doctor and it should not come as a surprise that the term 'physician heal thyself' appears in the Gospel he is credited with writing. Who spoke the words 'physician heal thyself', which are now part of a common expression?

Answer: Jesus

Jesus spoke the words, as quoted in Luke 4:23. 'Physician heal thyself' implies one should attend to his/her own imperfections before citing faults with others. According to information on the Web, the phrase refers to doctors being able to cure others but sometimes unable to do the same thing for themselves. I suppose it's a bit like an auto mechanic driving around in an automobile riddled with mechanical problems.

In the Scripture in question, Jesus made the statement in response to people demanding miracles from him. Luke 4:33-24, in the NIV Bible, states: "Jesus said to them, 'Surely you will quote this proverb to me: Physician, heal yourself! Do here in your hometown what we have heard that you did in Capernaum. I tell you the truth,' he continued, 'no prophet is accepted in his hometown.'"
5. Living off 'the fat of the land' is a phrase that appears in Genesis 45:18 in the Old Testament. Who used the term 'the fat of the land' in a conversation with Joseph?

Answer: The Pharaoh

The words 'fat of the land' were uttered by the Pharaoh in a conversation with Joseph. He used the term when he urged Joseph to invite his father and "their households" in the KJV to move to Egypt to 'eat the fat of the land'. Genesis 45:17-18, in the NIV Bible, states: "Pharaoh said to Joseph, 'Tell your brothers, Do this: Load your animals and return to the land of Canaan, and bring your father and your families back to me. I will give you the best of the land of Egypt and you can enjoy the fat of the land.'"
6. 'Let he who is without sin cast the first stone' was a term used by Jesus in John 8:7. What was the particular incident in which he spoke the words?

Answer: The woman caught in adultery

The term was used in the account of the woman who was caught in adultery. His statement "if any one of you is without sin, let him be the first to throw a stone at her" is one of the better known statements in the New Testament. Jesus made the statement to the Pharisees who had hauled the adulterous woman before him, demanding action. Notes in the NIV Study Bible state Jesus' statement disarmed them. "Since he spoke of throwing a stone, he could not be accused of failure to uphold the law," the notes state. "But the qualification for throwing it kept anyone from acting." Notes also state that when Jesus used the words 'without sin', "the phrase is quite general and means 'without any sin', not 'without this sin.'"

When the Pharisees heard this, "those who heard began to go away one at a time, the older ones first, until only Jesus was left, with the woman still standing there." Apparently, the older ones left first because they could all recall secret sins from their past. Notes in the NIV Study Bible state this about the older men: "They were the first to realize what was involved. But all the men were conscience stricken or afraid, and in the end only Jesus and the woman remained."
7. 'Eat, drink, and be merry' is another common expression that comes from the Bible with the actual wording in the King James Version stating "eat, drink and be glad." In what book in the Old Testament would you find the phrase?

Answer: Ecclesiastes

The term 'eat, drink and be glad' is found in Ecclesiastes 8:15 in the KJV. (The NIV also states 'eat, drink and be glad.') There is no conclusive proof, but it is believed by many theologians that King Solomon wrote Ecclesiastes. In a nutshell, the book offers advice on the true meaning of life and how every pursuit is worthless unless God is at the forefront.
8. 'An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth' is a saying that appears in two different places in the Old Testament and in Matthew 5:38. Who used the phrase in Matthew?

Answer: Jesus

Jesus made the statement; however, he definitely is not supporting an 'eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth' logic when the Scripture is put in context. Matthew 5:38-42, in the NIV Bible, states: "You have heard that it was said, 'Eye for eye, and tooth for tooth.' But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If someone strikes you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also. And if someone wants to sue you and take your tunic, let him have your cloak as well. If someone forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles. Give to the one who asks you, and do not turn away from the one who wants to borrow from you.'" The phrase first appears in the Old Testmant with the words "eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot" being found in Exodus 21:24.

The phrase is repeated in Leviticus 24:20.
9. 'The root of the matter' is a common saying found in Job 19:28 in the King James Version. Who used the term?

Answer: Job

Job is the correct answer. The expression 'root of the matter' means the basic cause of a problem. In the NIV Bible, the passage in question states the 'root of the trouble'. The 19th chapter of Job is devoted to Job's response to Bildad, one of his friends who had attempted to comfort him in his time of need.
10. 'Forbidden fruit' is a term that is derived from the Old Testament, specifically Genesis 2:17 and Genesis 3:3. What does the term refer to in the Old Testament?

Answer: Fruit from a tree, which Adam and Eve were forbidden to eat.

The tree of life and the tree of knowledge of good and evil were two special trees created by God, Scripture states. As documented in Genesis 2:16, Adam and Eve were told they were free to eat from any tree in the garden -- with the exception of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.

In the third chapter of Genesis, the serpent convinced Eve to eat from the tree and Adam did likewise. The rest, as they say, is history.
Source: Author Cowrofl

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor CellarDoor before going online.
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