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Quiz about Nursery Rhyme UK Government
Quiz about Nursery Rhyme UK Government

Nursery Rhyme UK Government Trivia Quiz


To meet a challenge laid down by bernie73, this quiz will have ten questions on aspects of British government inspired by, and (loosely) based on the nursery rhyme 'One, two, buckle my shoe'.

A multiple-choice quiz by rossian. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
rossian
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
406,915
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
339
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 2 (10/10), bopeep (10/10), Wordpie (9/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. 'One, two': Margaret Thatcher was Britain's first female Prime Minister. Who was the second? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. 'Buckle my shoe': Prime Minister between 1828 and 1830, the Duke of Wellington gave his name to a type of boot. What was his name before he was awarded a dukedom? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. 'Three, four': Ramsay MacDonald was Prime Minister in 1934. With which political party is he primarily associated? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. 'Knock on the door': which Foreign Secretary knocked on Margaret Thatcher's door in 1982 to resign over his department's failures, which had led to the Falklands War? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. 'Five, six': Anthony Eden was Prime Minister from 1955 until 1957. Which major event cost him his credibility and his position? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. 'Pick up sticks': Members of Parliament are not allowed to 'up sticks', or resign from their seats, during the lifetime of a parliamentary term. Which of these is an office to which they can be appointed which disqualifies them as an MP? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. 'Seven, eight': 1978 saw Britain's 'Winter of Discontent', bringing about the downfall of which Prime Minister and his government? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. 'Lay them straight': Not all Members of Parliament are straight and honest. Both Jonathan Aitken (1999) and Jeffrey Archer (2001) found themselves in gaol for which crime? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. 'Nine, ten': 10 Downing Street is widely known as the official residence of Britain's Prime Minister. It was a gift made by which monarch in 1732 to the First Lord of the Treasury? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. 'A big, fat hen': which man, grandson of a famous Austrian, is generally credited with coming up with the nickname 'Attila the Hen' for Margaret Thatcher? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. 'One, two': Margaret Thatcher was Britain's first female Prime Minister. Who was the second?

Answer: Theresa May

Theresa May took over as Prime Minister in July 2016 following David Cameron's resignation, brought about mainly because of Brexit. In many ways, May had inherited a poisoned chalice with Britain divided into two camps - for and against leaving the European Union. Negotiations with Europe were difficult, to say the least, and an attempt to increase her authority by holding an early general election in April 2017 made matters worse, leading to a hung parliament, with the Conservatives having to call on minority parties for support. May resigned in 2019, with Boris Johnson succeeding her as Prime Minister.
2. 'Buckle my shoe': Prime Minister between 1828 and 1830, the Duke of Wellington gave his name to a type of boot. What was his name before he was awarded a dukedom?

Answer: Arthur Wellesley

Wellesley was born in Dublin, his father being the 1st Earl of Mornington and his mother Anne Wellesley, Countess of Mornington. Wellesley joined the army in 1787 with his early climbing of the ranks being bought (common practice at the time for those who could afford it) before his prowess as a commander led to further promotions. Wellesley was involved in many battles against the French forces of Napoleon Bonaparte, culminating in Napoleon's final defeat in the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. Wellesley had been created 1st Duke of Wellington the previous year, and became Prime Minister in 1828 - his term lasted only until late 1830, just under three years in total. He returned briefly as a caretaker Prime Minister for a few weeks in late 1834.

Wellington boots derive their name from his dukedom. Some even have buckles.
3. 'Three, four': Ramsay MacDonald was Prime Minister in 1934. With which political party is he primarily associated?

Answer: Labour

MacDonald is notable for being the first UK Prime Minister from the Labour Party, having taken office in January 1924. This term lasted only until November the same year, as the government did not have a majority and lost an election to the Conservatives, led by Stanley Baldwin. MacDonald returned to power in 1929, still with a minority but with support from the Liberal Party.

His tenure this time lasted until 1935, but from 1931 was termed a National Government, a coalition with Conservatives and Liberals. MacDonald was expelled from the Labour Party for what was perceived as a betrayal and his deterioration in both physical and mental faculties led to him passing the reins to Stanley Baldwin in 1935.

He died in 1937.
4. 'Knock on the door': which Foreign Secretary knocked on Margaret Thatcher's door in 1982 to resign over his department's failures, which had led to the Falklands War?

Answer: Lord Carrington

All the men listed have been Foreign Secretary at one time or another, but it was Peter Carrington, Lord Carrington, who stood by his principles and resigned his post. He felt his department had failed to recognise the threat posed by Argentina and should have foreseen the invasion of the Falkland Islands.

This precipitated the Falklands War which lasted for ten weeks and cost hundreds of lives to each side. By her own account, Margaret Thatcher tried to persuade Carrington to stay, but he felt he had lost the trust of the Conservative Party as a whole. From 1984 until 1988, Lord Carrington was Secretary General of NATO.
5. 'Five, six': Anthony Eden was Prime Minister from 1955 until 1957. Which major event cost him his credibility and his position?

Answer: Suez crisis

It was the Suez crisis which brought down Eden. The Suez Canal was run by foreign owners and the Egyptian president, Gamal Nasser, had nationalised it - i.e. taken it into Egyptian ownership. An invasion of Egypt was begun by Israel, followed by the UK and France, but not backed by the United Nations. Under pressure from the UN, the Soviet Union and USA, the invaders withdrew. The humiliation this caused led his party to lose faith in Eden's leadership and he resigned as Prime Minister and as leader of the party in 1957, with Harold MacMillan succeeding him.

The Hungarian Revolution took place in 1956 as well, but the UK was not involved in this. The Cuban missile crisis took place in 1962. The Profumo affair was in 1961, and brought down MacMillan and the Conservative government.
6. 'Pick up sticks': Members of Parliament are not allowed to 'up sticks', or resign from their seats, during the lifetime of a parliamentary term. Which of these is an office to which they can be appointed which disqualifies them as an MP?

Answer: Chiltern Hundreds

The ban on Members of Parliament resigning during the course of a parliament dates from 1624, although any MP can choose not to stand for re-election at a normal General Election. To enable them to leave sooner, they can be appointed to an 'office of profit under the Crown', which automatically disqualifies them from being an MP. There are two offices used for this purpose, of which the Chiltern Hundreds is the better known - the full title is 'Crown Steward and Bailiff of the three Chiltern Hundreds of Stoke, Desborough and Burnham'. The other office, used alternately, is 'Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Manor of Northstead'.

The other places listed are all the names of real places in the UK.
7. 'Seven, eight': 1978 saw Britain's 'Winter of Discontent', bringing about the downfall of which Prime Minister and his government?

Answer: James Callaghan

The Winter of Discontent is the name given to the latter months of 1978 and going into 1979 which were marked by numerous strikes by workers and trade unions reacting to the limits on pay increases brought in by the Labour government, led by James Callaghan. Callaghan had taken office after Harold Wilson retired in 1976.

The fact that it was a Labour government imposing restrictions on pay made the situation worse since the party is the traditional supporter of the so called 'working classes'. Callaghan also appeared dismissive of the problems, summed up by one newspaper headline as 'Crisis? What crisis?' after he denied that the country was in chaos. Callaghan and his government were defeated in a vote of no-confidence in 1979 with the resulting general election won by the Conservatives led by Margaret Thatcher.
8. 'Lay them straight': Not all Members of Parliament are straight and honest. Both Jonathan Aitken (1999) and Jeffrey Archer (2001) found themselves in gaol for which crime?

Answer: Perjury

As it happens, both Aitken and Archer were Conservative politicians so, in the interests of balance, I will tell you that other MPs who have served time are Elliot Morley and Jim Devine, from the Labour Party, and Chris Huhne from the Liberal Democrats. Both Aitken and Archer were charged with perjury and perverting the course of justice. Aitken's conviction arose from his lies over a hotel bill paid on his behalf by the Saudi Arabian royal family in 1993, a clear conflict of interest with his role as a government minister. Having claimed his wife had paid the bill, in court, he was convicted of perjury at his 1999 trial. Archer's conviction arose from a libel case he brought against a newspaper in 1987.

The evidence he gave at the time was proved to be false, leading to his trial and conviction in 2001.

He also had to repay the libel damages he had received in the earlier case.
9. 'Nine, ten': 10 Downing Street is widely known as the official residence of Britain's Prime Minister. It was a gift made by which monarch in 1732 to the First Lord of the Treasury?

Answer: George II

King George II offered the property to Sir Robert Walpole, who is often cited as being the first Prime Minister, although his official title was First Lord of the Treasury, which is still one of the roles normally held by the serving Prime Minister. Walpole refused to accept 10 Downing Street as a personal gift, insisting it be an official residence linked to his position and those who succeeded him.

Much work was needed to extend the property, with Walpole not moving in until 1735. Many early Prime Ministers declined to live there - many of them were Lords of the Realm and owned bigger and more impressive London houses themselves. 10 Downing Street houses the Prime Minister's offices and is where he or she meets visiting heads of state.

It is also the official residence, although some, including Tony Blair and David Cameron, have lived in the larger apartment next door at number 11.
10. 'A big, fat hen': which man, grandson of a famous Austrian, is generally credited with coming up with the nickname 'Attila the Hen' for Margaret Thatcher?

Answer: Clement Freud

Sir Clement Freud was the grandson of the psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud and brother to Lucian Freud, the well known artist. Clement Freud began his career as a chef, before turning to politics in 1973 when he was already something of a 'personality' known to the public.

He represented Ely as a Liberal from 1973 until 1987, when he stood down and left politics. Freud had maintained some media activities, notably as a regular panel member on the radio show 'Just a Minute'. Although it seems impossible to prove, Freud is usually cited as dubbing Maggie 'Attila the Hen', one of the wittier political nicknames.
Source: Author rossian

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