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Quiz about Mucus the quiz youd rather not take
Quiz about Mucus the quiz youd rather not take

Mucus, the quiz you'd rather not take


We all need the stuff to survive, but how much do you actually know (or want to know) about it?

A multiple-choice quiz by satguru. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
satguru
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
270,041
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
1819
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. Mucus is a useful substance which protects and lubricates the body systems. But which system shouldn't have any inside it? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Which of these slang terms for phlegm is the odd one out? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. What is the similar word mucous used as? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. What is the difference between phlegm and sputum? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Is blue mucus an urban myth?


Question 6 of 10
6. Catarrh is caused by mucus blocking the nasal passages.


Question 7 of 10
7. There is mucus in mucilage.


Question 8 of 10
8. Why do men's jackets have decorative buttons on the cuffs (besides the ones to do them up)? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. How does mucous membrane/mucosa differ from skin? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Apart from within a human or animal body, is there officially any practical use for mucus that has been extracted? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Mucus is a useful substance which protects and lubricates the body systems. But which system shouldn't have any inside it?

Answer: Circulatory system

Of course the mucus we're most familiar with is respiratory mucus, especially from the nose and lungs. But without a mucus lining the stomach would digest itself, and it lubricates and protects all three systems. In the circulatory system it would simply block the flow.
2. Which of these slang terms for phlegm is the odd one out?

Answer: Donkey (England)

A donkey is in your throat, the rest have left it. Talk about graphic... The more well known frog in one's throat is a dry cough normally causing hoarseness. Therefore a donkey has not yet been expectorated (spat out) whereas the other three are lovely terms, especially the descriptive oyster, of the end product before or after removal. There is also the originally Portsmouth (UK) local term 'Dockyard oyster' from the results in the local port after a product has been left on the pavement.

Sources: A dictionary of slang and unconventional English by Eric Partridge
Onlineslangdictionary.com
3. What is the similar word mucous used as?

Answer: An adjective

Although it galls me every time someone spells the substance with an o, the o makes it a description rather than a substance. The commonest usage is in 'mucous membrane', the membranes in the body that are lubricated with and produce mucus.
4. What is the difference between phlegm and sputum?

Answer: Sputum is anything coughed up including phlegm

A doctor or nurse needs to know these differences. In respiratory diseases many clues can be gained from analysing the sputum coughed up, and it describes any substance ejected from the lungs, which is most frequently phlegm but you can probably imagine the alternatives.
5. Is blue mucus an urban myth?

Answer: No

It's rare but the two common colouring bacteria in mucus usually even out to green. But in the rare cases where the Pseudomonas aeruginosa/pyocyanaea (cyan meaning blue) outnumber enough Staphylococcus aureus which is yellow, the bogies produced are a cyan shade of blue. I've yet to actually see any though.
6. Catarrh is caused by mucus blocking the nasal passages.

Answer: False

People assume the massive amount of mucus produced by the nose during a cold is what stops you breathing but in fact the nasal passages swell to narrow them almost to a halt. Decongestants reduce the inflammation but can become addictive if used too frequently.
7. There is mucus in mucilage.

Answer: False

Plants need their equivalent of mucus, and although similar, mucilage is not the same and is actually edible, should anyone want to bother. It's more likely to be used in adhesives although the commonest edible version is the main body of marshmallows, if that hasn't put anyone off now. They can also contain the same blue bacteria found in human mucus.
8. Why do men's jackets have decorative buttons on the cuffs (besides the ones to do them up)?

Answer: To stop people wiping their nose on them

The most accepted designer of this accessory was George Washington, whose army fought and caught colds, and were added to stop them using them to wipe their noses. They may now appear to be fashion accessories as they appear to have no other function, but will deter any attempt to be lazy and use the sleeve. I've also heard Napoleon may have been responsible but people like to blame most things on him!

Shirt cuffs use buttons to do them up, but jacket buttons normally have a few in a row which do nothing at all but are just sewn on. Although some do use interesting looking fancy buttons that is adding form to function; the accepted explanation was the function came first.
9. How does mucous membrane/mucosa differ from skin?

Answer: It is internal and produces mucus

There is a subtle but definite change between our skin and the mucous membrane, technical term mucosa. The mouth is a good example, all the smooth wet areas inside are mucosa, and secrete saliva in cells similar to mucus producing ones. The vagina and male foreskin are also internal surfaces, producing lubricating mucus rather than skin which always has a layer of epidermis and does not have any mucus producing capabilities.

They do produce sweat but this is wet not slimy and a different substance altogether.
10. Apart from within a human or animal body, is there officially any practical use for mucus that has been extracted?

Answer: Materials science

The amazing properties of slug mucus, which allows it to climb smooth surfaces, has been investigated as an ultra efficient water absorbing polymer. By studying the way it works scientists have put it to use as a possible solution in many applications "The researchers foresee many potential applications of slug slime technology in materials science and bioengineering: new drug delivery systems, pollutant traps for sewage treatment plants, and water-based lubricants, for example."

I hope none of you chose the pizza topping...
Source: Author satguru

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor crisw before going online.
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