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Quiz about Nematodes Might Outlive Us All
Quiz about Nematodes Might Outlive Us All

Nematodes Might Outlive Us All! Quiz


This is a quiz about the fascinating nematode.

A multiple-choice quiz by ramonesrule. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
ramonesrule
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
404,408
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
157
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Question 1 of 10
1. What is another commonly used name for nematodes? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. What clade or group are nematodes classified as? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. A 2013 survey in the journal "Zootaxa" put the number of nematode species at how many? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. In what environments do nematodes live? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Nematodes do not have stomachs.


Question 6 of 10
6. One species of nematode is known for causing the parasitic disease trichinosis which can cause vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhea. What is the best way to prevent this disease? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Some nematode species exhibit a rare reproductive system that is characterized by the presence of males and hermaphrodites. What is this type of reproductive system called? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. One specific species of nematode has had its entire genome mapped and is known as a model organism because of how extensively it's been covered. The name of the species is a bit fancy, can you guess which one it is? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Free-living marine nematodes play an important role in marine environments. Which of the following do they NOT do? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. In 2003 the nematode became the first known life form to do what? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. What is another commonly used name for nematodes?

Answer: Roundworms

Nematodes are a category of cylindrical, unsegmented (the body is not divided into specific segments) worm. Their body is triploblastic which means it has three layers of cells (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm). Plant-parasitic nematodes are known as eelworms.
2. What clade or group are nematodes classified as?

Answer: Ecdysozoa

Ecdysozoa include insects, crustaceans, chelicerata (includes sea spiders, arachnids, scorpions and horseshoe crabs), myriapods (includes millipedes and centipedes) and nematodes. This group is characterized by a molting process called ecdysis whereby a cuticle is shed for a new one. This molting process gives the group its name.
3. A 2013 survey in the journal "Zootaxa" put the number of nematode species at how many?

Answer: 25,000

There has been some debate about the actual number of nematode species because it can be hard to tell the difference between one species and another. Due to that fact, the number often changes depending on the source and the author. In 2013, there was a survey on animal biodiversity in the megajournal "Zootaxa" that put the number at over 25,000.

In 1993 the number was estimated at over one million which was followed by an article putting the number at somewhere around 40,000. Processes such as DNA barcoding and rarefaction curves have put the figure actually somewhere around one million.
4. In what environments do nematodes live?

Answer: Nearly every ecosystem on Earth

Nematodes have been able to adapt to just about any environment. They are found in fresh and saltwater, in deserts, in forests, in mountains and low regions, in polar regions and tropical regions. They've been found deep below the surface of the Earth and they make up approximately ninety percent of all animals on the ocean floor. Because of their diversity, and because there are just so many of them, they represent about eighty percent of all individual animals on Earth and play a critical role in many environments.
5. Nematodes do not have stomachs.

Answer: True

The anatomy of nematodes is fascinating. They are usually very small, the smallest being microscopic and one of the largest measuring eight meters long (found inside a sperm whale). Their bodies usually have ridges or rings. The mouth has three or six lips, with a series of teeth on the inner edges.

The tail has a caudal gland on the tip that secretes a substance allowing the nematode to attach itself to objects. The mouth structure opens to a sucking pharynx and the pharynx connects directly to an intestine, there is no stomach.

The last part of the intestine forms a rectum that expels waste through an anus, just below the tip of the tail.
6. One species of nematode is known for causing the parasitic disease trichinosis which can cause vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhea. What is the best way to prevent this disease?

Answer: Thoroughly cook meat before eating

Although washing your hands before eating is a good common practice, trichinosis is caused by eating undercooked meat and so the best practice is to ensure meat is thoroughly cooked before it's consumed. The lovely little nematode responsible for this disease is Trichinella spiralis, known as the 'trichina worm'.

This disease occurs in rats, pigs, bears, and humans. Other nematodes that are parasitic to humans include ascarids, filarias, hookworms, pinworms, and whipworms.
7. Some nematode species exhibit a rare reproductive system that is characterized by the presence of males and hermaphrodites. What is this type of reproductive system called?

Answer: Androdioecy

Most nematode species have distinct females and males (known as being dioecious) but there are some species that have the rare characteristic of having both hermaphrodites and males. Reproduction is usually sexual although hermaphrodites can self-fertilize. Males are usually smaller than females and hermaphrodites and have a distinct bent or fan-like tail. Nematode species that exhibit androdioecy include C. elegans, C. briggsae, and Pristionchus pacificus.
8. One specific species of nematode has had its entire genome mapped and is known as a model organism because of how extensively it's been covered. The name of the species is a bit fancy, can you guess which one it is?

Answer: C. elegans

C. elegans (Caenorhabditis elegans) is known as a model species because it has had its entire genome sequenced, the developmental fate of every cell determined, and every neuron mapped. This species of nematode lives in the soil and is a transparent nematode that is about one millimeter in length.

It lacks both a circulatory and respiratory system and most of the species are hermaphrodites. In 1963, South African biologist Sydney Brenner proposed using this simple organism as a model organism. The early cell division process of this species of nematode is among the most understood in the world of asymmetric cell division. Studies of this species of nematode have aided research into aging, Alzheimer's disease and sleep studies.
9. Free-living marine nematodes play an important role in marine environments. Which of the following do they NOT do?

Answer: Latch on to boats causing damage

Free-living marine nematode species are absolutely abundant in both salt and freshwater environments and play many important roles. They feed on algae, animals, fungi, bacteria, fecal matter and decomposing organisms. Because of that, they are a factor in recycling and decomposition processes. They are also sensitive to changes in their environments as a result of pollution.
10. In 2003 the nematode became the first known life form to do what?

Answer: Survive an unprotected descent back to Earth's surface from space

The C. elegans species of nematode made news in 2003 when it was discovered that it had survived the space shuttle Columbia crash. They were part of a research project that was included on board and survived the re-entry back into Earth's atmosphere. Descendants of those nematodes were included in the Endeavour STS-134 mission in 2011. Nematodes have also spent time on the International Space Station and in 2018 were included in a study on muscle dystrophy during spaceflight.
Source: Author ramonesrule

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