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Quiz about Im Not a Myth
Quiz about Im Not a Myth

I'm Not a Myth Trivia Quiz


As part of "Mike and Rowena's Invertebrate Inquizitions", this quiz allows a group of disgruntled invertebrates to set the record straight as to what they really are, despite what their mythological names may suggest.

A multiple-choice quiz by doublemm. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
doublemm
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
321,684
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
6771
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: loriannie (4/10), HumblePie7 (8/10), aspire63 (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. If you hear my name, you may think that I'm a one-eyed giant. Well, you'd be half right. In fact, I rarely exceed 5 mm. I dwell in several bodies of freshwater around the world. What am I?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 2 of 10
2. Although I am called medusa, I have no snakes for hair, nor will my glare turn you to stone. Instead, I am what some may call a jellyfish. What is the name of this jelly-like substance of which I am made? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Upon hearing our name, you may think that we are the dryads, nereids, oreads and naiads of Greek mythology. However, in this instance we are actually young crickets. What are we? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Although called the Hercules beetle, you won't find me battling mythological beasts or ascending to the top of Mount Olympus in Greece. Instead, where will you find me? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Despite being called a dragonfly, you won't see me breathing fire or guarding any castles. However, you could say that I am just as well known around the world as my namesake. Which country is so fond of me that they sometimes call themselves the "Land of the Dragonflies"? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. With a name like blue morpho, you may associate me with a shape shifting mythological figure. Furthermore, my two species' names may lead you to believe that I am one of two figures from the Trojan war. But I am none of these. What am I? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. As scorpions and spiders, we are often associated with a woman of Greek myth who angered Athena - her name was Arachne. To what does Arachne lend her name? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. I'm bigger than most cockroaches, as my name suggests. My name also links me with a term used to describe Orion and Antaeus - characters in Greek mythology. What is my name? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. If I were to tell you that I am a hydra, you may picture a many-headed serpent from Greek mythology. However, I am actually a cylindrical fresh-water animal with stinging tentacles, similar to those of a jellyfish. Which venomous cells provide this "sting"? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. When you hear my name, you may expect me to be able to hold up the heavens on my shoulders. However, I'm actually a horned beetle common to Malaysia which rarely exceeds 130 mm. What is my name? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jun 11 2024 : loriannie: 4/10
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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. If you hear my name, you may think that I'm a one-eyed giant. Well, you'd be half right. In fact, I rarely exceed 5 mm. I dwell in several bodies of freshwater around the world. What am I?

Answer: Cyclops

The Cyclops genus incorporates 400 species of tiny creatures.

They are crustaceans and, like all crustaceans, start out life as nauplii (a crustacean's first larval stage). However, unlike many crustaceans, the Cyclops genera do not develop two more eyes as well as the single eye which their nauplii possess, but live their entire lives with just one eye. This eye is usually red or black in colour and is the sole reason for the name, Cyclops.

Although mostly found in freshwater, Cyclopes can tolerate salty water, though not to the level of salinity as seawater. This type of water is referred to as brackish water. These animals can also tolerate toxic/unsuitable conditions by forming a slimy membrane around their bodies.
2. Although I am called medusa, I have no snakes for hair, nor will my glare turn you to stone. Instead, I am what some may call a jellyfish. What is the name of this jelly-like substance of which I am made?

Answer: Mesoglea

Medusae are part of the phylum, cnidaria, which, although containing over 9,000 species, can be split into just two groups/body forms - one of which is the medusa.

Medusae are comprised of the jelly-like substance, mesoglea, and possess tentacles, which protrude from the central body which is typically disc/bell-shaped.

The distinct shape of the medusae is well known by many and is thought to have been popularised by the German scientist, Ernst Haeckel. Haeckel is also accredited with coining the term, "phylum".
3. Upon hearing our name, you may think that we are the dryads, nereids, oreads and naiads of Greek mythology. However, in this instance we are actually young crickets. What are we?

Answer: Nymphs

Nymphs are not larvae, but are immature insects - similar in form to the adults of the species, but much smaller. Nymphs never enter a larval stage.

Insects which begin life as nymphs include crickets, mayflies, cockroaches and termites.

In mythology, this term encompasses a group of women made up of dryads (wood nymphs) nereids (sea nymphs), oreads (mountain nymphs) and naiads (fountain/river nymphs).
4. Although called the Hercules beetle, you won't find me battling mythological beasts or ascending to the top of Mount Olympus in Greece. Instead, where will you find me?

Answer: Central and South America

The Hercules beetle is one of the largest insects in the world, mainly due to their enormous horns. The beetles use these horns to battle for a mate. Discounting the length due to horns, females of the species have larger bodies. Males of the species can reach 6.75 inches (with horns included).

The reason for the name, "Hercules", is that it is believed to be the strongest animal on Earth for its size. It is said to be able to carry a weight 850 times heavier than itself.
5. Despite being called a dragonfly, you won't see me breathing fire or guarding any castles. However, you could say that I am just as well known around the world as my namesake. Which country is so fond of me that they sometimes call themselves the "Land of the Dragonflies"?

Answer: Japan

The evil image of the mythological dragon has been passed onto the dragonfly, with many countries viewing the insect as bad luck. For example, the dragonfly is seen as having strong links with the devil in both Romania and Sweden, and with evil snakes in several other countries. It is also in these European countries where stories emerge of trouble-causing dragons. It is therefore unsurprising that the country where dragonflies are seen as symbols of good luck is also the country which respects and even worships dragons - Japan.

Dragonflies are amongst the fastest insects whilst in flight, but, although possessing the characteristic six legs of an insect, they cannot walk.
6. With a name like blue morpho, you may associate me with a shape shifting mythological figure. Furthermore, my two species' names may lead you to believe that I am one of two figures from the Trojan war. But I am none of these. What am I?

Answer: A butterfly

The blue morpho is a large butterfly found in the Central and South American rainforests. Its wing span can reach 20 cm, making it one of the largest butterflies in the world (the largest being the Queen Alexandra birdwing - 30 cm wing span). The morpho's wings are also noted for their stunning electric blue colour.

The two species of the morpho are the morpho peleides (the name by which Achilles is sometimes known) and morpho menelaus (a Greek king - husband of Helen).
7. As scorpions and spiders, we are often associated with a woman of Greek myth who angered Athena - her name was Arachne. To what does Arachne lend her name?

Answer: Our class

The class, Arachnida, contains over 100,000 species - all are invertebrates and all possess 8 legs. Most, when hearing the term, "arachnid", will immediately think of spiders, but the class also contains scorpions, mites, ticks, and other creatures.

Scorpions, as well as their 8 walking legs, possess pincers towards the front of their body. This is one of their two main weapons (the other being the sting). It is said that the significance of the scorpion's sting (i.e. how dangerous it is) can be determined by looking at its pincers. Generally, small pincers suggest a deadlier sting and large pincers suggest that it is less harmful.
8. I'm bigger than most cockroaches, as my name suggests. My name also links me with a term used to describe Orion and Antaeus - characters in Greek mythology. What is my name?

Answer: Giant cockroach

Cockroaches are rather unremarkable in terms of special adaptations and so are thought to be some of the earliest types of insects which still exist. They are relatively large and some, such as the giant burrowing cockroach, can weigh up to 30 grams.

Cockroaches are often represented in the media and are the stereotypical insect which people picture when hearing the term, "creepy crawly". This is in spite of only 30 of the 4,000 species of cockroaches living in human inhabited areas, and only 4 of these being classed as "pests".

Many also know of cockroaches as "the only animals which could survive a nuclear blast". Whilst this assertion is debatable, cockroaches are undeniably hardy and some species can live for up to 10 years!
9. If I were to tell you that I am a hydra, you may picture a many-headed serpent from Greek mythology. However, I am actually a cylindrical fresh-water animal with stinging tentacles, similar to those of a jellyfish. Which venomous cells provide this "sting"?

Answer: Cnidocytes

Hydra are composed of the same jelly-like substance which makes up jellyfish - mesoglea, and are also part of the same phylum - cnidaria. However, instead of starting out as polyps (tubular creatures) and developing into medusae (bell/disc shaped creatures), hydra remain as polyps throughout their life.

They are cylindrical creatures which can attach themselves to rocks using their basal foot. At the opening/mouth end of the creature there are tentacles which contain the cnidocytes. These cells release toxins which are used for capturing prey. The toxins cause much pain, rather than paralysis, to larger creatures and so are also useful as a defence mechanism.
10. When you hear my name, you may expect me to be able to hold up the heavens on my shoulders. However, I'm actually a horned beetle common to Malaysia which rarely exceeds 130 mm. What is my name?

Answer: Atlas beetle

Although 130 mm is clearly not remarkable in mythological circles, it is in the insect world. The horns possessed by the Atlas beetle are used in fights with other beetles.

The larvae of the Atlas beetle are known for their aggression towards other grubs if rivalled for resources and will often fight each other to the death.

Once grown, the Atlas beetle can carry up to 4 kg. This is the same as a human being carrying an elephant and a zebra together (from http://www.gedcasserley.saddleworth.net/html/atlas_beetle.html).

It is unclear as to whether the beetle was named after the mythological Greek titan or the North African mountain range.
Source: Author doublemm

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor crisw before going online.
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